Vote-rigging in referendum on independence for Scotland; 1 in 4 Americans favor secession

On September 18, 2014, in a record voter turnout of 84.59%, the people of Scotland seemingly rejected independence from the United Kingdom by a whopping 55% “no” vs. 45% “yes”.
Scottish unionists won by a wider-than-expected 10-percentage-point margin, to the surprise of everyone because right up to the actual referendum, polls had shown a neck-to-neck race between “yes” and “no”.
It is, therefore, sobering that clear and visual evidence of vote fraud has been uncovered, as shown in this video, where a vote counter is seen periodically moving ballot sheets from the “yes” to the “no” pile, and where stacks of ballots are piled up in the “no” section when the top ballots can be seen to have the “yes” box checked off.

[H/t FOTM’s Gingercake for the video]
So who/what is thwarting Scotland’s independence?
How about TPTB of the European Union, for one?
Two days before the Scottish referendum, Dina Spector reports for Business Insider:

The Scottish independence movement will embolden other active separatist groups in Europe to win their freedom, whether or not Scotland votes to secede from the UK on Thursday. From Catalonia and Basque Country in Spain to Veneto, South Tyrol, and the island of Sardinia in Italy to Flanders in Belgium, ‘the precedent of the vote on self-determination will reverberate around the Continent,’ The New York Times writes. If you want a rough idea of how European borders would have to be redrawn if regions with a separatist agenda got their way, you can look at the map below, put together by the European Free Alliance [EFA], to which “40 progressive nationalist, regionalist and autonomous parties throughout the European Union” belong.

Click map to enlarge

Map of Europe's secessionist movements
Meanwhile, back in the good ol’ U. S. of A., a new Reuters/Ipsos poll finds that as many as a quarter of Americans, or 1 in 4, are open to their states leaving the union — a move no U.S. state has tried in the 150 years since the bloody Civil War that led to the end of slavery in the South.
Some 23.9% of Americans polled from Aug. 23 through Sept. 16 said they strongly support or tend to support the idea of their state breaking away, while 53.3% of the 8,952 respondents strongly oppose or tend to oppose secession.
Some other findings of the poll:

  • The urge to sever ties with Washington cuts across party lines and regions, though Republicans and residents of rural Western states generally favor the idea more than Democrats and Northeasterners. By region, the idea was least popular in New England, the cradle of the Revolutionary War, with just 17.4% of respondents open to pulling their state out. It was most popular in the Southwest, where 34.1% of respondents back the idea. That region includes Texas, where an activist group is calling the state’s legislature to put the secession question on a statewide ballot.
  • Anger with Obama‘s handling of issues ranging from Obamacare to the Islamic State (aka ISIL) jihidasts drives some of the secessionist feeling. Mordecai Lee, professor of governmental affairs at the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee, who has studied secessionist movements, said interest in secession “seems to have heated up, especially since the election of President Obama.” Brittany Royal, a 31-year-old nurse from Wilkesboro, North Carolina, said anger over Obamacare made her wonder if her state would be better off on its own, “That has really hurt a lot of people here, myself included. My insurance went from $40 a week for a family of four up to over $600 a month for a family of four. The North Carolina government itself is sustainable. Governor (Pat) McCrory, I think he has a better healthcare plan than President Obama.”
  • Others say long-running Washington gridlock prompted them to wonder if their states would be better off striking out on their own. Roy Gustafson, 61, of Camden, South Carolina, who (ironically) lives on disability payments from the federal government, said, “I don’t think it makes a whole lot of difference anymore which political party is running things. Nothing gets done. The state would be better off handling things on its own.”

~Eowyn

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0 responses to “Vote-rigging in referendum on independence for Scotland; 1 in 4 Americans favor secession

  1. “Obviously the Scottish vote was rigged, with perfectly stacked ballots being pulled out of a box on video. But in an area under jurisdiction of a corrupt Queen and Rothchild clan, what more could you expect?”
    J.Stone

     
  2. Reblogged this on Catholic Glasses and commented:
    I figured Scotland’s Vote for Independence was “rigged.” Probably dead people voted. 😉

     
  3. cg, are you implying that they perhaps imported the dead vote from shykago – or perhaps some of their precincts voted 100+%………………:-O

     
  4. That so many are disillusioned and gave up on the feral gubbmint is WONDERFUL: it means the deceit’s failed to convince them! If we’re REALLY lucky, perhaps as many secretly feel the same, but were not consulted or interviewed.
    The USofA has morphed into the USSA and is now held captive by an elite as bad –or worse!– as that of King George III, which was ended by the Revolt of the American Colonies. From all I’ve read in the history of that era, no more than one-half of the colonists supported the Revolution; one’s neighbour could be a Loyalist spy, ready to turn in anyone s/he suspected of being a terrorist.
    Yes, the vote in Scotland was rigged, as 90% of all voting is world-wide; why would the USSA be any different? That is the sole reason for using electronic machines: they are invisibly manipulated, and leave neither a paper trail nor witnesses to a hand count, such as done here in Kanada, thank God! We’re saddled with too many crooks and criminals as it is, likely 80%, however minor some of them may be.
    Never forget that during this period, England had bested France to become the world’s greatest imperial power, primarily by its unmatched fleet [http://www.revolutionary-war.net/king-george-iii.html]. The USSA now has become the same, hugely overstretched by the agressive wars of Bush 41, Clinton, Bush 43, and now Death Star Obamination, our Dark Rider on a pale horse….

     
  5. This post makes the common mistake of equating developments in the UK with superficially similar developments in the US. In reality, the two nations have totally different political cultures, and failure to realise this can result in misleading conclusions.
    First of all, it’s by no means clear that the British establishment really want to preserve the United Kingdom. Bear in mind that they are in thrall to the EU, which wants to break up its member states into regions that can easily be ruled directly from Brussels. An ‘independent’ Scotland would be such a region; and it would certainly not be independent.
    Mr Cameron’s Conservative Party had an additional reason for wanting the demise of the Union: the loss of all those Scottish Labour MPs from the Westminster parliament might just have enabled the Conservatives to cling on to power at next year’s general election. The snag was that Mr Cameron himself would no longer have been party leader; he would never have survived the shame of being the Prime Minister who broke the Union. What a dilemma for him! Now he is campaigning to prevent Scottish MPs from voting on English legislation. Same result as independence, but not so messy.
    Secondly, it’s much harder to rig an election in the UK than in the US, as we still do everything manually, just the same as in dear old Queen Victoria’s day. Not a single voting machine from Land’s End to John o’Groat’s. Clearly there was electoral fraud, but it’s impossible that it was enough to change the result. On a margin of one or two per cent, maybe; but ten per cent? Even the British press would have noticed that.
    It’s also worth mentioning that a ‘No’ majority was predicted by all the pre-election polls except one. If there had been a discrepancy between the polls and the election, that would certainly arouse suspicion. It was the last fortnight of the campaign, with its virtually fifty-fifty split, that was the anomaly. The polling organisations admitted that there was no exact precedent for what they were doing, and that could help to explain how they failed to predict the size of the majority. Or maybe a lot of voters just got cold feet, as well they might.
    As a matter of fact, I think it’s pretty clear why a majority of the Scottish people voted to preserve the Union. Most of them didn’t want to live under Alex Salmond’s Marxist regime. The rest did, but realised that it would collapse if it wasn’t being subsidised by English taxpayers. I hope your readers don’t think that the Scottish Nationalist Party is anything like the Tea Party? Obama would fit right into it.

     
  6. Thank you Dr. Eowyn for this interesting post. Now there is voter fraud in Scotland. This is terrible.

     

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