Tag Archives: WIC

The Trump Effect: Illegals are opting out of welfare programs

The WIC or Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children, created in 1974, is a federal welfare program for supposedly low-income pregnant women, breastfeeding women, and children under the age of five — regardless of whether they are U.S. citizens or in the U.S. illegally.

The basic eligibility requirement is a family income below 185% of the federal poverty level, which in 2018 is an annual income $25,100 for a family of four (the figure is higher for  Alaska and Hawaii). Most states allow automatic WIC eligibility for persons or families who are already receiving other welfare programs, such as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (aka food stamps), Medicaid, or Temporary Assistance for Needy Families.

Amanda Prestigiacomo reports for The Daily Wire, Sept. 3, 2018, that a proposed Trump Administration rule to deny legal status to illegals on welfare is prompting hundreds of thousands of illegal “immigrants” to opt out of WIC.

Both illegal and legal immigrants have been inundating health care providers with calls demanding they be dropped from federal assistance programs like WIC. Illegals are asking to be dropped from WIC because they are scared of being deported, while some legal immigrants apparently believe their legal status will be in jeopardy because of rumors circulating about potential Trump Administration rules.

Agencies in at least 18 states say they’ve seen drops of up to 20% in enrollment. When President Donald Trump first took office, there were 7.4 million women and children enrolled in WIC. That number declined to roughly 6.8 million in May 2018, which is a decrease of 8.1% or 600,000 fewer enrollees. The drop-off may also be due to a bolstered economy and a decline in immigrant birth rates.

In 2011, Rep. David Cicilline (D-RI) said WIC cost $100 per person.

600,000 fewer WIC recipients would mean a savings of $60 million, in 2011 dollars.

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~Eowyn

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1/3 of U.S. population now receive federal food assistance

food stamp

This is what 4½ years of the Obama presidency have wrought.

According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture Office of Inspector General’s latest Audit Report 27001-0001-10, “Overlap and Duplication in Food and Nutrition Service’s Nutrition Programs” (henceforth, Report), the number of Americans receiving subsidized food assistance from the federal government is now a staggering 101 million — a number that is one-third of the entire U.S. population, outnumbering the number of Americans who work full-time in the private, i.e., non-government, sector of the economy.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture runs a Food and Nutrition Service (FNS), the mission of which “is to provide children and needy families with better access to food and a more healthful diet through its food assistance programs and comprehensive educational efforts”. FNS consists of 15 individual programs with a combined fiscal year (FY) 2012 budget of $114 billion, some of which may duplicate or overlap with other programs (Report, pp. 8 & 2). Translated into simple English, that means WASTE.

Those 15 “food nutrition” programs include:

  • The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), the agency’s cornerstone program formerly known as the Food Stamp Program, comprises the largest portion of FNS’ overall budget at $88.6 billion in FY 2012.
  • Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) program, which had a budget of $6.6 billion in FY 2012.
  • Child nutrition programs such as the National School Lunch Program (NSLP), School Breakfast Program (SBP), Summer Food Service, and the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP), which together totaled over $18 billion in FY 2012. (Report, p. 8)

FNS estimates that a total of 101 million people currently participate in at least one of its programs, including over 47 million in SNAP or food stamps, a historically high figure that has risen with the economic downturn and expanded eligibility and funding of food assistance programs. (Report, p. 11)

Unsustainable!!!!

H/t CNSNews

~Eowyn

The U.S. Department of Agriculture estimates that a total of 101,000,000 people currently participate in at least one of the 15 food programs offered by the agency, at a cost of $114 billion in fiscal year 2012. – See more at: https://cnsnews.com/news/article/101m-get-food-aid-federal-gov-t-outnumber-full-time-private-sector-workers#sthash.NoGORBtZ.dpuf

The number of Americans receiving subsidized food assistance from the federal government has risen to 101 million, representing roughly a third of the U.S. population.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture estimates that a total of 101,000,000 people currently participate in at least one of the 15 food programs offered by the agency, at a cost of $114 billion in fiscal year 2012.

– See more at: https://cnsnews.com/news/article/101m-get-food-aid-federal-gov-t-outnumber-full-time-private-sector-workers#sthash.NoGORBtZ.dpuf

The number of Americans receiving subsidized food assistance from the federal government has risen to 101 million, representing roughly a third of the U.S. population.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture estimates that a total of 101,000,000 people currently participate in at least one of the 15 food programs offered by the agency, at a cost of $114 billion in fiscal year 2012.

That means the number of Americans receiving food assistance has surpassed the number of full-time private sector workers in the U.S.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), there were 97,180,000 full-time private sector workers in 2012.

The population of the U.S. is 316.2 million people, meaning nearly a third of Americans receive food aid from the government.

Of the 101 million receiving food benefits, a record 47 million Americans participated in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), commonly known as food stamps. The USDA describes SNAP as the “largest program in the domestic hunger safety net.”

The USDA says the number of Americans on food stamps is a “historically high figure that has risen with the economic downturn.”

SNAP has a monthly average of 46.7 million participants, or 22.5 million households.  Food stamps alone had a budget of $88.6 billion in FY 2012.

The USDA also offers nutrition assistance for pregnant women, school children and seniors.

The National School Lunch program provides 32 million students with low-cost or no-cost meals daily; 10.6 million participate in the School Breakfast Program; and 8.9 million receive benefits from the Woman, Infants and Children (WIC) program each month, the latter designed for low-income pregnant, breastfeeding, and postpartum women, as well as children younger than 5 years old.

In addition, 3.3 million children at day care centers receive snacks through the Child and Adult Care Food Program.

There’s also a Special Milk Program for schools and a Summer Food Service Program, through which 2.3 million children received aid in July 2011 during summer vacation.

At farmer’s markets, 864,000 seniors receive benefits to purchase food and 1.9 million women and children use coupons from the program.

A “potential for overlap” exists with the many food programs offered by the USDA, allowing participants to have more than their daily food needs subsidized completely by the federal government.

According to a July 3 audit by the Inspector General, the USDA’s Food Nutrition Service (FNS) “may be duplicating its efforts by providing participants total benefits in excess of 100 percent of daily nutritional needs when households and/or individuals participate in more than one FNS program simultaneously.”

Food assistance programs are designed to be a “safety net,” the IG said.

“With the growing rate of food insecurity among U.S. households and significant pressures on the Federal budget, it is important to understand how food assistance programs complement one another as a safety net, and how services from these 15 individual programs may be inefficient, due to overlap and duplication,” the audit said.

– See more at: https://cnsnews.com/news/article/101m-get-food-aid-federal-gov-t-outnumber-full-time-private-sector-workers#sthash.NoGORBtZ.dpuf

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