Tag Archives: White Privilege

George Clooney: “There’s a dark cloud hanging over our country right now”

george clooney and libtards

Damon, Clooney and Moore: Bunch of angry libtards

Feel free to keep your butt in Italy, George.

Bonus: Julianne Moore wants “re-education” for everyone.

From NY Post: George Clooney’s “Suburbicon” has a timely subplot — based both on present times and a 1957 incident — about racism in white America. That subplot, however, resounded deeply during the Venice Film Festival press conference for the film, which stars Matt Damon and Julianne Moore.

“I was watching a lot of speeches on the campaign trail about building fences and scapegoating minorities and I started looking around at other times in our history when we’ve unfortunately fallen back into these things,” said Clooney, talking about how the pic germinated.

While casting around for story ideas, Clooney found a 1957 incident that happened in Levittown, Pa., in which an African-American family moved into a suburban development; however, many white residents in the area reacted with violence. Then, while looking to try to make a film out of the Levittown story, he remembered that the Coen brothers had written a script called “Suburbicon,” so those two elements were meshed together.

Of course at that stage the Charlottesville, Va., race riots had yet to happen, noted Damon, who in the film plays a bad guy who goes all the way, to an extent that he’s “never been able to do so far” in his career.

“When we were filming we obviously could not have predicted the race riots,” said Damon. “We weren’t literally thinking that race riots would erupt in America right before this came out. But it does speak to the fact that these issues have not, and are not, going away. So there’s an honest reckoning in our country.”

As to the character Damon plays: “It’s kind the definition of white privilege when you are riding around your neighborhood on a bike covered in blood murdering people and the African-American family [who are his neighbors] is getting blamed for it,” he said.

Clooney pointed out that the film’s very dark tone reflects the anger he sees in the U.S. today.

“If you go to our country…depending on what side of the aisle you sit on, it’s probably the angriest I’ve ever seen it,” he noted. “There’s a dark cloud hanging over our country right now.” But he added: “I’m an optimist…I believe that we will get through all these things…but people are angry; a lot of us are angry.”

The “Suburbicon” director also underlined that the film “isn’t a movie about Donald Trump. … This is a movie about our coming to terms constantly with the idea that we have never fully addressed our issues with race.”

Moore, who plays a double role in the pic, made a clear-cut a statement on the issues being raised by Charlottesville.

“We are living in the United States where people are arguing about removing Confederate monuments: They must be removed,” she said. “You simply cannot have these figures from the Civil War in town squares and in universities for our children to see. As a parent and as a citizen I need to be active in the eradication of those, in the re-education of everyone. We have to take responsibility for it.”

Clooney joined her on a similar note: “This is something that is really festering right now in the United States: Talking about the Confederate flag, and the Jefferson Davis monument,” he noted.

“Now, if you want to wear it [a confederate flag] on your T-shirt or if you want to hang it on your front lawn…have at it. But to hang it on a public building where possibly African American tax payers are paying for it — and it’s a symbol of hate — that cannot stand.”

DCG

Advertisements

TDS: American Horror Story: Cult to help “alleviate the real world pain” of our election

Another Hollyweird product I won’t be watching.

From IGN: Putting dangerous witches, sexy vampires and demonic nuns on hold, American Horror Story: Cult pulls back the curtain to explore the psychological aftermath from the 2016 presidential campaign.

Fear and anxiety take center stage here, pitting Sarah Paulson and Evan Peters against each other in a perverse tale of progress and paranoia. Season 7 puts the cult of personality directly in the spotlight, revealing that the real monster in this horror story is us. After viewing the first three episodes of Cult — titled “Election Night,” “Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark” and “Neighbors from Hell” — at an advance press screening, it’s safe to say that this move is a welcome change for the series.

Using the 2016 presidential campaign — election night, specifically — as a jumping off point, it’s clear from the very first moments of AHS: Cult that fear is the main component giving the new season life. Fear is currency; it’s the motivator and the separator. In Cult, it feeds the fire of rising cult figure, Kai Anderson (Peters), and pushes phobia-ridden Ally Mayfair Richards (Paulson) to her psychological breaking point.

 “I do think politics in the past year has become entertainment in a weird way in our country, and I think this plays into that a little bit,” Ryan Murphy stated during a Q&A session that followed the screening. “I think how the show begins on election night, pro or con … I think everybody can relate to that feeling of that evening. And that was the launch of the season.”

While there are many players in the “AHS: Cult” game — Alison Pill is Ally’s wife Ivy, Billie Lourd is Kai’s sister Winter, and Billy Eichner and Leslie Grossman are creepy neighbors, The Wiltons — it’s the dynamic between Kai and Ally that elevate the story in a way many fans may not expect. “It’s not about Trump, it’s not about Clinton,” Murphy continued. “It’s about somebody who has the wherewithal to put their finger up in the wind, see what’s happening and is using that to rise up and form power.”

For Kai Anderson, the election of Donald Trump is a watershed moment — leading the blue-haired maniac on a quest for power. According to Murphy, he has wanted to explore The Manson Family in an installment of AHS for quite some time. But as the writer/director/executive producer explained, this concept has since evolved: “The thing that we’re doing is we’re really examining all different sorts of cults — and there are many, many famous ones. Throughout the season, Evan Peters is, I think, playing six different cult leaders: Kai, Manson, David Koresh, Andy Warhol … Jim Jones is a big one. And we really examine, how do those people rise to power? And why did people follow them?

On the opposite side of the spectrum is Ally and Ivy — a Michigan couple living a comfortable existence steeped in success and a heaping helping of white privilege. That detail is played upon multiple times throughout Cult, showing that both sides of the Trump/Clinton argument are fair game. From a Rachel Maddow shoutout to some residual Jill Stein-rage, there are elements of satire throughout these first three episodes that help to alleviate the real world pain and anxiety people are still experiencing.

But Ally’s storyline of how her phobias are manifesting — particularly her coulrophobia, or fear of clowns — is an affective and terrifying way of keeping the horror in American Horror Story. In many ways, this season isn’t about an American horror story, but what Murphy considers to be our American horror story, showcasing both sides of the election’s aftermath in their extremes.

 “One of the things that I personally experienced after this election was a wild increase in anxiety,” Murphy explained. “We’re on the brink of nuclear war one week, and then, the next week we’re onto something else equally extreme.” Instead of burying his head in the sand, though, Murphy decided to use AHS as a means to deal with this new reality; to, in his words: “lean into the escalation of fear in our culture.”

Read the rest of the story here.

DCG

Know the rules: A white professor can’t be Chinese because of “privilege”

daniel bell

Professor Daniel Bell: Ain’t no Rachel Dolezal…

A man can be a woman and a white woman can be black. Yet a white man can’t be Chinese. I can’t keep up with all the science-defying liberal rules anymore.

From Yahoo: A white scholar’s recent op-ed suggests he might need some lessons on his own privilege. 

Daniel Bell, a white dean at China’s Shandong University, recently penned a piece in the Wall Street Journal entitled “Why Anyone Can Be Chinese.” In it, he laments how he’s not considered Chinese despite his self-proclaimed dedication to the culture.

China, he argues, should look at identity as cultural rather than racial, concluding the piece with his ultimate hope:

“President Xi Jinping describes his broad agenda for the country as the ‘China dream,’” Bell writes. “My own China dream is more modest: to be viewed as a Chinese not just in my own mind but in the minds of my fellow Chinese.”

Bell claims to have respect for the Chinese. But his piece shows that he’s not looking at identity through the lens of the Chinese. John Kuo Wei Tchen, associate professor and director of Asian/Pacific/American Institute, NYU notes: Bell begins his piece, making comparisons between himself and a Chinese-American who “doesn’t speak Chinese or identify in any way with Chinese culture,” and “forcefully rejects” the label “Chinese.”

But the connections Bell makes are apples to oranges. Bell, a white man from Canada, ignores the real, human experiences that Chinese people live through, Tchen noted.

Bell isn’t someone whose family has been brought up in China through generations, communicating through insider references. His ancestors haven’t lived through events like the Opium Wars or the Cultural Revolution that have shaped the population’s outlook. Bell is a white man whose roots and values come from elsewhere. 

There’s another issue at hand with Bell’s comparison. Ideas of belonging and identity are tied to political environment, Tchen says. These concepts are forged out of history and traditions, constructed over time by cultural and political forces. A western view of these ideas will be different from, say, a Chinese one. Bell doesn’t seem to acknowledge that, though.

“Notions of citizenship and belonging come out of particular political cultures. Just because that’s what he believes in, he wants to apply that to China which doesn’t really make any sense,” Tchen said. “It can’t just be willy-nilly applied to any other place.”

Bell continues his argument, listing several traits of his that he believes somehow underscore his “Chineseness.” Though he brings up possible barriers to acceptance like citizenship, commitment to culture, and lack of language skills, he insists those aren’t problems for him. He points out how he’s often “the only person wearing Chinese-style clothing” at conferences. And earlier in the piece he mentions his marriage to a Chinese woman as if those details help assert Chineseness.

In another line, he even puts down native Chinese people and pretentiously writes, “millions of poorly educated Chinese citizens speak hardly any Mandarin, and yet nobody questions their Chineseness.”

However, identity isn’t so simple as checking traits off a list, Tchen said. Bell’s possession of such qualities does not make him more “eligible” to be Chinese.

To be Chinese is not a mere checklist, just like being black or from any other culture isn’t about hitting a set number of achievements.

“If he were to become an expert on Toni Morrison, if he were to then master African-American cuisine, if he had married an African-American woman, would he feel he can claim being African-American or black?” Tchen questioned.

At one point, Bell attempts to point out the flaws in seeing Chineseness as racial and describes the country’s tumultuous relationship with foreigners.

“When China is powerful and secure, foreigners are welcome and considered employable, including at the highest levels of government,” he wrote in the op-ed. “When China is weak, foreigners are often viewed with suspicion and even hatred.”

Tchen told HuffPost that he agrees that ideally, we “need to reject the very notion of ‘race’ and hence racial belonging.” These ideas don’t translate across historical and cultural differences, he says. But again, being part of a culture is dependent on historical context. Identity goes further than today’s politics and culture.

At the end of the day, Bell’s piece begs the question posed by Tchen. “Are there not deeper shared values that are more important to explore than a European Canadian wanting to be accepted as ‘Chinese?’”

DCG

Are You Guilty Of Whiteness?

If you are White, Asian, Latino, or Not-Black-Enough (like Ben Carson), this professor says you are guilty.

What consequences will society suffer from colleges indoctrinating students into race hatred? This is America, but it may soon look like South Africa, where “whites” are hunted down for perceived offenses.


https://www.thecollegefix.com/post/34091/

Dr. Kris Sealey

THE COLLEGE FIX: RACIAL ISSUES WHITE PRIVILEGE
Professor teaches students about ‘the problem that is whiteness’
NATHAN RUBBELKE – JULY 5, 2017

Editor’s Note: This is the fifth in a series of articles reporting on ‘Where Do We Go From Here: Creating An Intersectional Vision for Radical Social Change,’ a diversity conference held June 13-16 at Fairfield University

FAIRFIELD, Conn. – Serious explorations into race should focus on the problem of whiteness and be grounded in the claim that it’s a hegemonic “power apparatus,” a Fairfield University professor suggested at a recent conference aimed at pushing “radical social change” in higher education.

“So more and more, the courses that I teach on race have become courses in which I expect my students to engage in the hegemonic power of whiteness,” said Sealey, who’s taught courses such as “Black Lives Matter” and “Critical Race Theory…”

George Yancy

…Sealey’s comments were based in the book “Black Bodies, White Gazes: The Continuing Significance of Race” by Emory University philosopher George Yancy.

Discussing Yancy’s work, the professor said she’s moved by his premise that “any inquiry into the experience of blackness must include some genealogy or some history of the white gaze.” Taking the thesis seriously, Sealey said, means “to acknowledge that any critical investigation of race should devote some time to the problem that is whiteness.”

Some take-aways from this article:

  • Whiteness means a specific power apparatus that exists at the expense of the disempowerment of black people.
  • To be white in the U.S. is to be a perpetuator of the power apparatus unless one actively and consistently resists.
  • It is possible, perhaps necessary, to acknowledge one’s personal implications in the white power apparatus.

https://www.thecollegefix.com/post/34091/


Are you honkies and oreos feeling guilty enough?
Not enough for these professors.

Girl bye: Lisa Durden fired following her racist BLM remarks on ‘Tucker Carlson Tonight’

lisa durden

Lisa Durden is now a “victim”

Boo- hoo-hoo.

From Fox News: A New Jersey college professor who appeared on “Tucker Carlson Tonight” to defend a black-only Black Lives Matter event has been fired after the college’s president said she made racially insensitive comments on the show, according to reports.

Essex County College in Newark announced Lisa Durden’s firing Friday. She taught communications and pop culture classes as an adjunct, the Newark Star-Ledger reported.

On his June 6 show, Carlson and Durden, who is black, got into a heated exchange over the appropriateness of allowing only blacks to attend a Black Lives Matter event in New York City on Memorial Day.

“Listen. What I say to that is boo-hoo-hoo,” she said. “You white people are angry because you couldn’t use your ‘white privilege’ card to get invited to the Black Lives Matter’s all-black Memorial Day celebration! Wow!”

Two days after the show, the school suspended Durden with pay. She addressed the matter with school officials Tuesday, three days before the firing was announced.

College president Anthony Munroe said Friday the Fox News appearance prompted calls from students, faculty and prospective students and their families “expressing frustration, concern and even fear that the views expressed by a college employee with influence over students would negatively impact their experience on the campus.”

He noted that although Durden did not mention her affiliation with the school during the show or claim to be representing its views, “her employment with us and potential impact on students required our immediate review into what seemed to have become a very contentious and divisive issue.” 

Munroe went further in explaining his reasons for firing Durden in a lengthy statement — in which he invoked the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.

“The character of this institution mandates that we embrace diversity, inclusion and unity,” he said. “Racism cannot be fought with more racism.” 

Durden declined comment Sunday when contacted by Fox News.

She has said that she was “publicly lynched” by the school.

On Friday, she told the Star-Ledger that she has received a lot of support from school staff members and students, but compared her experience to a rape victim who is blamed for the crime, and a person who returns from war to a hostile environment.

“I thought it would be a safe place for me,” she told the paper, referring to the college. “I thought when I came home from war, I would be safe.” Instead she said she was fired.

Durden’s attorney, Leslie Farber, said she believes her client’s free speech rights were violated. “It is free speech guaranteed by the 1st Amendment of the US Constitution and New Jersey law,” Farber told Fox News Sunday.

The attorney said they were considering whether to take legal action in the matter.

DCG

Students at liberal arts college wear white puzzle piece pins to remind themselves of white privilege

white-puzzle-project

College Democrat Aileen Ida: Her struggle is real…

I’ll pass.

From Daily Mail: Students at a small liberal arts college in Central Pennsylvania are wearing white puzzle piece pins this month to raise awareness of white privilege and its impact on people of color.

The Elizabethtown College Democrats launched a project over the weekend called the ‘Personal Identity Campaign,’ which revolves around the question – ‘How does race affect my life, directly and indirectly.’

The organizers of the campaign, which officially kicked off on campus Saturday evening, say that wearing the white pin will serve as a reminder of the ‘struggles’ associated with racial identity.

Founded in 1899, Elizabethtown College has about 1,800 undergraduate students, of whom 86 per cent are white. The school’s 203-acre campus is stated in Lancaster County, where according to the latest US Census data from 2015, more than 90 per cent of the population is white.

Aileen Ida, president of the College Democrats who is spearheading the white pin campaign, tells Lancaster Online that the goal of the project is to get people to talk openly about race and white privilege.

According to Ida, who is Caucasian, all white people inherently benefit from white privilege, whether they like it or not, but few pause to think about the effect it has on their lives and the lives of minorities around them. Her organization is hoping to change that, one puzzle piece at a time.

‘People of color have to every day wake up and think about race,’ Ida told Local 21 CBS last week. ‘They have to think about how it affects their life, what they have to do for it to not negatively affect their life, and as a white person, we don’t usually have to think about that.’

Ida’s group tweeted on Tuesday that so far, 50 students, alumni and people in the community have made a pledge to wear the puzzle pins for one month.  Ida pointed out that the purpose of the pin project is not to malign white people because of the color of their skin, but rather to encourage everyone to reflect on racial identity.

According to the college Democrats’ official Facebook page, the campaign was inspired by Barb Girod, a white Lutheran pastor from Wisconsin, who made a commitment to wear a white puzzle piece pin every day for a year ‘to force herself to think about her white privilege and the impact white privilege has on people of color.’

Not everyone, however, appears to be on board with the project. Facebook user Paul Lewis slammed the campus activists as ‘crazy leftists’ and likened the pins to Nazi-era yellow ‘Jude’ stars. ‘I love being white and am proud of my Italian-American heritage…everyone should be proud of their race and embrace it,’ he wrote in a comment on the group’s page.

Another commenter pointed out that the group has chosen the puzzle piece a symbol of white privilege, even though puzzle pieces are most commonly identified with Autism awareness.

DCG

Stop Tweeting Your #Firstsevenjobs

Why?

Because according to the Slate author, “It’s just a way to disguise your privilege.”

liberal nonsense

From Slate: August is the dullest month. Offices across the land sit half empty. It’s too hot to do anything outside. There’s nothing good on TV. (Even the Olympics, which ostensibly rescue us from indoor boredom every four Augusts, are largely boring. Dressage?) And so we denizens of the internet attempt to entertain ourselves the only way we know how: by playing stupid hashtag games on Twitter.

Last week’s was even stupider than usual. Social media users employed the hashtag #firstsevenjobs alongside straightforward, unadorned lists of their actual first seven jobs. The hashtag originated with singer-songwriter Marian Call, who told Marketplace, “I like this hashtag because it’s really individual, it’s about each person’s really tiny journey and you get to see thousands of strangers reflecting on that.”

With all due respect to Call, who is probably a wonderful musician, #firstsevenjobs is a very bad hashtag. For one thing, no one can agree on what the hashtag actually is: You’ll get hundreds of results whether you search #firstsevenjobs, #myfirstsevenjobs, #first7jobs, #myfirst7jobs, or #1st7jobs. (For some reason, #my1st7jobs didn’t really catch.) The whole point of a hashtag is that it can be used to organize disparate tweets into a single stream; that doesn’t work if no one can agree on whether numbers ought to be expressed as numerals or words. (This problem afflicts the recently trending #fav7films, too. Perhaps it’s time for Twitter to collectively adopt AP Style rules: Spell out single-digit numbers, but use numerals for numbers 10 and above.)

For another thing, #firstsevenjobs—my preferred, AP-approved rendering—encourages navel-gazing of the most boring variety. Granted, posting on social media is inherently self-indulgent, but this hashtag doesn’t even encourage people to be creative or funny in tooting their own horns. You might learn interesting factoids about celebrities by searching the hashtag—Hamilton creator Lin-Manuel Miranda started out operating the slush machine at his aunt’s store! Writer Erik Larson used to wash pig sperm out of laboratory glasses! Actress Kerry Washington worked at The Limited!—but the average Twitter user’s #firstsevenjobs tweet is unlikely to interest anyone beyond his or her mother.

But what really bothers me about #firstsevenjobs is the ideology it reflects. #Firstsevenjobs promotes the ideal, as old as America, of the self-made man who creates his own destiny through hard work. The archetypal #firstsevenjobs tweet begins with a few humble, menial jobs—babysitting, retail work, slush-machine operating—and culminates in glory. Even if the seventh job on the list isn’t anything to write home about, the tweeter’s bio will demonstrate that she has overcome adversity to attain an interesting, lucrative, or high-powered career. “What is compelling about this snapshot of career trajectories is that it, by nature, emphasizes a career as a journey and not necessarily the logical result of a blinkered, do what you love mantra,” writes Adam Chandler in a piece praising the hashtag at the Atlantic. “It also implicitly belies and discourages narratives fashioned by nepotism and privilege.”

It’s true that the hashtag discourages narratives of privilege, but that doesn’t mean those narratives aren’t true! #Firstsevenjobs obscures the extent to which the socioeconomic status we are born into shapes our career potential. In fact, it seems designed to make people feel smug about pulling themselves up by their bootstraps, even though their career success probably had more to do with luck than with hard work or determination. #Firstsevenjobs is an optimistic hashtag, but also an unrealistic one.

Social mobility in America has been stagnant for 50 years, even as the gap between rich and poor widens. A 2009 study comparing the U.S. to several Western European nations, Australia, and Canada found that “there is a stronger link between parental education and children’s economic, educational, and socio-emotional outcomes than in any other country investigated.” There are plenty of possible reasons for this—the high cost of college, the frayed social safety net, the death of unions—but the upshot is that the social caste you are born into is more relevant to where you end up than your first seven jobs. A more illustrative hashtag, in my opinion, would be #myparentsjobs, which would reveal the extent to which social status and income potential remain fixed from one generation to the next. (And it shouldn’t surprise anyone that most people’s first seven jobs were humble. The jobs that teenagers and young adults take are almost by definition unskilled jobs, whether they’re rich or poor.)

Read the rest of this diatribe here.

h/t Twitchy

DCG