Tag Archives: Washington State Department of Corrections

Washington state inmates on hunger strike over muffins for breakfast

From Seattle Times: After years of getting cold muffins for breakfast, inmates at the Coyote Ridge Corrections Center are refusing meals in protest.

Offenders at Coyote Ridge, which is in Connell, Franklin County, and houses approximately 2,065, have skipped meals out of frustration over a range of issues, primarily the quality of their food. The strike began Feb. 1 and continued through at least Monday afternoon.

It’s the second time in a year that Washington prisoners have protested over food quality, raising concerns that the unrest could continue to simmer — or escalate.

The hunger strikes have highlighted the fact that the state Department of Corrections (DOC) has not fully complied with Gov. Jay Inslee’s 2013 executive order to promote healthful food at state facilities.

The action at Coyote Ridge — and a strike last year at Walla Walla’s Washington State Penitentiary — could also be a key early test of the state’s new state Office of Corrections Ombuds. The Legislature and Inslee authorized that position last year to provide some independent oversight of the DOC.

Joanna Carns, director of that office, has made food issues an early priority. After last year’s meal strike, her office has partnered with the DOC to survey the inmates at the Washington State Penitentiary about food.

“While it might not be immediately apparent to the outside person, food is actually a critical issue in corrections, and is one of the things that will lead inmates to riot,” Carns said.

At the request of the DOC, Inslee has included $2.78 million in his proposed new two-year state operating budget to bring back hot breakfasts to Coyote Ridge, Washington State Penitentiary and three other prisons, which all moved to cold breakfasts in recent years.

Read the whole story here.

DCG

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How many convictions does it take for Seattle City Attorney to place a homeless criminal in jail after his latest assault?

City bureaucrat, I mean attorney, Pete Holmes

We may never know what Seattle City Attorney Peter Holme’s magic number is because, apparently, one having 72 convictions – including 14 felonies – is not enough to warrant your butt being thrown in jail for ANOTHER assault.

As I’ve noted many times in the past, the city of Seattle does not hold the homeless accountable for their criminal actions. See examples here, here, here and here.

Why do the Seattle demorat bureaucrats allow this criminal behavior? My guess is they don’t want their official crime statistics to show any kind of correlation between the increase in the homeless population and an increase in crime. They also have a vested interest in keeping the homeless industrial complex alive.

A homeless man was recently arrested for sucker-punching a man on the street. The perp, Francisco Calderon, is a 55-year-old who was recently released from state custody. Calderon has been homeless and unemployed for decades and his rap sheet includes 72 convictions (that record includes 14 assaults).

According to the story from KOMO News, Calderon has been under the supervision of the Department of Corrections 14 times. The perp is also a known drug user.

So for Calderon’s latest sucker-punch attack (a 4th degree assault charge) what did the city recommended as a punishment?

The city wanted a plea deal in which the perp with 72 convictions would undergo a mental health evaluation, enroll in a drug treatment program and have two years probation. The perp would be released back onto the streets because he already had time served.

Fortunately, Seattle Municipal Court Judge Ed McKenna put a stop to this nonsense and sentenced Calderon to 364 days in jail stating, “I’m not sure I have ever seen a more significant history of violent offenses. Everything in that criminal history tells me that he’s a violent offender and is going to re-offend.”

Read about the city’s intent to give freedom to this perpetual homeless criminal at the KOMO story here.

Given all the details of Calderon’s past, it will make your blood boil that a public official would endanger the lives of his fellow citizens by giving a man with 72 convictions a chance to run free and injure another person.

DCG

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Man accused of Portland execution-style shootings was convicted felon under Washington state supervision, living in public housing

Career criminal James Javontae Barquet

Not enough gun control laws can stop a determined, career criminal. Nor can the justice system, apparently.

This past Monday, an 11-time convicted felon shot and killed two people – execution style – in two separate incidents in Portland, Oregon.

According to Oregon Live, the perp is James Javontae Barquet (age 26) who is now charged with aggravated murder charges, first-degree robbery and felon in possession of a firearm.

Barquet killed 70-year-old Carol Horner and 51-year-old Brian Hansen with single shots using a .45-caliber pistol. Barquet shot both victims in the head.

Read about the details of the killings here.

Oregon Live provides more information about this career criminal:

  • Barquet lived at Longfellow Creek apartments in Seattle, a public housing complex.
  • Barquet has 11 felony convictions in Washington dating back to 2011.
  • His prior convictions include drug possession, theft, robbery, unlawful possession of a firearm and riot with a deadly weapon.
  • The perp was released from state prison on July 11 after serving seven months for felony possession of a controlled substance.
  • Barquet entered a state supervision program two days later, where he met weekly with a community corrections officers.
  • The Washington State Department of Corrections officer was unaware that Barquet had traveled to Oregon. 

Unlawful possession of a firearm is a Class A misdemeanor in Oregon, punishable by up to one year in prison. Possession of a firearm by a convicted felon is a Class C felony in Oregon, punishable by up to five years in prison.

I wonder if Barquet every served full sentences for his previous offenses?

More proof that gun control laws cannot control the free will of a man intent on committing crimes.

DCG

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Washington State DOC not getting information to the public regarding inmates released early

DOC Secretary Dan Pacholke

DOC Secretary Dan Pacholke


Last December I told you about how the Washington State Department of Corrections (DOC) had accidentally released approximately 3,200 inmates from their prison system due to a “sentencing computation issue”. This “computation issue” occurred over a 13 year period.
It was disclosed a week later that one of those prisoners accidentally released early had been charged with killing his girlfriend in a car crash when he should have been behind bars.
Then another week later it was disclosed that another prisoner mistakenly released three months early had been charged with shooting and killing a teenager. The perp committed that crime less than two weeks after early release.
Washington State Governor Jay Inslee

Washington State Governor Jay Inslee


Now, a month after the initial story came to light, the Seattle Times reports that the DOC has failed to disclose essential information that would allow the public to check its work in trying to fix those errors. The department has not fulfilled ongoing requests by The Seattle Times and others to fully disclose records for up to 3,200 prisoners the agency estimates may have been released early by mistake.
Guess what the DOC can’t even do? Specify when prisoners were to be released along with their actual release date — even for cases officials say have been cleared.
Without those dates, it is impossible for victims’ families, the media or anyone who might be interested to check whether the DOC has wrongly cleared cases in which an inmate has committed a crime while he or she still should have been in prison.
And guess what the DOC’s excuse is? “It’s not intentional; it’s more unintentional,” said DOC spokesman Jeremy Barclay. “It just takes a little bit more time to populate those (data) fields and get them posted so that you and everybody can see them on the website.”
That’s there excuse? Seems to me it would take a hot minute to enter a date in a computer and hit “update”, “refresh”, or whatever is necessary to update information. But that’s just me. Government always has to make everything as complicated as possible. Including determining accountability.
Read the rest of the story here.
accountability
DCG

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