Tag Archives: Vietnam

Commie traitor comes from "a long line of sad people"

Traitor

Jane Fonda, ‘Peace, Love and Misunderstanding’ Star, On The Occupy Movement

Commie traitor Hanoi Jane has a new movie coming out.  So of course, she’s giving presses spewing her opinion.  Here’s an excerpt from HuffingtonPuffington’s interview with woman.
HuffPo:  In “Peace Love and Misunderstanding” (out in limited release now), Fonda plays Grace, the spirited-yet-estranged mother of the newly single Diane (Catherine Keener) and grandmother to Zoe (Elizebeth Olsen) and Jake (Nat Wolff). In the film, Fonda’s character plays a war protester, which — considering Fonda’s outspoken traitor history — led us into some interesting conversations about her political past and her thoughts on current protest, namely the Occupy movement.
You look like you’re having the time of your life in this movie. I was. I had a very good time, yes.
Is that why you chose it? I’d never played a character like her. Contrary to what some people think, I’m not like her. I never was a hippie. Also, I have a daughter and grandchildren and the idea that I would have been deprived of seeing my daughter for 20 years and never meet my grandchildren moved me very much. And, you know, forgiveness is a big theme in my life and so I wanted to make a movie about it.
Your character is a war protester. Could you have played this character in the late ’70s or early ’80s? Well, I wasn’t old enough [laughs].
True. The age of the character aside, though. Aside from whether I would have been old enough? I think, probably back in the ’70s, it would have been a little bit too … you know, I never was that kind of a war protester. I was more of an organizer; it was a little bit more serious. And I wasn’t known for my sense of humor in those days. I probably would have thought it was a little too light and frivolous, vis-à-vis the war — when the war was going on. But, now, it’s a very different time. And I’m different.
Why has your sense of humor changed? Because I spent ten years with Ted Turner. He taught me how to laugh [laughs]. It’s true.
You really think that you didn’t know how to laugh before meeting him? Not really, no. I come from a long line of a lot of sad people.

Wonderful


Again, your character is a war protester. What’s your opinion of the Occupy movement? Right on! I say right on! It’s an important, wonderful movement. It doesn’t fit the mold.
Is that what you like about it? That it doesn’t fit the mold? I think that’s what allows it to be successful in its own way. Because it has no leader; it has no set of rules. But, the values are good and it makes a difference. And I say right on.
Your point about not having a leader is interesting. It limits the range if there’s a leader. This can occupy a big space on a lot of different areas, but the core value is, “What about democracy?” It’s about democracy and against greed.
For so many reasons. It was the first time I learned how important movies can be. They really do affect people’s lives.
Against greed?  This coming from a woman who has an estimated net worth of $120 million and her former husband Ted Turner who has an estimated net worth of $2.1 billion.  Nothing greedy about that I guess, even though Rosanne Barr would like to behead both of them.
Forgiveness is a big theme in her life?  Of course it is, especially when it comes to selling books being greedy.  We need to forgive her for “That two-minute lapse of sanity will haunt me until the day I die.” Explain away all you want you American traitor.
You come from a long line of a lot of sad people?  I come from a long line of family members who fought and served in the military, including a father who served in Vietnam and Korea. I learned from him how important service to your country can be.  Those who fight/fought to protect and serve this great nation really do affect people’s lives.
DCG

Please follow and like us:
0
 

Jane Fonda Memorial Wall — Very Heart Warming.

 
After more than 40 years, the Vietnam veterans of the United States of America have raised a phenomenal amount of money to memorialize another one of Hollywood’s loyal American citizens, who went out of their way to aid and abet the enemy and congratulate them on their treatment of U.S. POW‘s. The memorial says it all!

Yeah, I know, I got teary eyed when I saw this one too .


~Steve~                                 H/T To Miss May
 
 

Please follow and like us:
0
 

Lt Col George Goodson, USMC (Ret) Lays It on the Line

BURIAL AT SEA

Burial at Sea

by Lt Col George Goodson, USMC (Ret)

In my 76th year, the events of my life appear to me, from time to time, as a series of vignettes. Some were significant; most were trivial.

War is the seminal event in the life of everyone that has endured it. Though I fought in Korea and the Dominican Republic and was wounded there,Vietnam was my war.

Now 42 years have passed and, thankfully, I rarely think of those days in Cambodia, Laos, and the panhandle of North Vietnam where small teams of Americans and Montangards fought much larger elements of the North Vietnamese Army. Instead I see vignettes: some exotic, some mundane:

*The smell of Nuc Mam.
*The heat, dust, and humidity.
*The blue exhaust of cycles clogging the streets.
*Elephants moving silently through the tall grass.
*Hard eyes behind the servile smiles of the villagers.
*Standing on a mountain in Laos and hearing a tiger roar.
*A young girl squeezing my hand as my medic delivered her baby.
*The flowing Ao Dais of the young women biking down Tran Hung Dao.
*My two years as Casualty Notification Officer in North Carolina, Virginia, and Maryland.

It was late 1967. I had just returned after 18 months in Vietnam. Casualties were increasing. I moved my family from Indianapolis to Norfolk, rented a house, enrolled my children in their fifth or sixth new school, and bought a second car.

A week later, I put on my uniform and drove 10 miles to Little Creek, Virginia. I hesitated before entering my new office. Appearance is important to career Marines. I was no longer, if ever, a poster Marine. I had returned from my third tour in Vietnam only 30 days before. At 5’9″, I now weighed 128 pounds – 37 pounds below my normal weight. My uniforms fit ludicrously, my skin was yellow from malaria medication, and I think I had a twitch or two.

I straightened my shoulders, walked into the office, looked at the nameplate on a Staff Sergeant’s desk and said, “Sergeant Jolly, I’m Lieutenant Colonel Goodson. Here are my orders and my Qualification Jacket.”

Sergeant Jolly stood, looked carefully at me, took my orders, stuck out his hand; we shook and he asked, “How long were you there, Colonel?” I replied “18 months this time.” Jolly breathed, you must be a slow learner Colonel.” I smiled.

Jolly said, “Colonel, I’ll show you to your office and bring in the Sergeant Major. I said, “No, let’s just go straight to his office.” Jolly nodded, hesitated, and lowered his voice, “Colonel, the Sergeant Major. He’s been in this  job two years. He’s packed pretty tight. I’m worried about him.” I nodded.

Jolly escorted me into the Sergeant Major’s office. “Sergeant Major, this is Colonel Goodson, the new Commanding Office. The Sergeant Major stood, extended his hand and said, “Good to see you again, Colonel.” I responded, “Hello Walt, how are you?” Jolly looked at me, raised an eyebrow, walked out, and closed the door.   Continue reading

Please follow and like us:
0
 

After Egypt, 11 Dominoes May Fall

The overnight news from Egypt is that, despite President Hosni Mubarak’s concession to the rioters revolutionaries that he would step down, the unrest and violence are worsening. It appears pro-Mubarak people have been unleashed against the revolt and they are targeting western media. CNN’s Anderson Cooper was punched in the head yesterday and ABC’s Christiane Amanpour was surrounded by an angry mob who screamed “We hate Americans!”
The Egyptian unrest itself was inspired by what happened a week earlier in Tunisia where huge mobs, enraged by their political leaders’ corrupt lavish lifestyle, succeeded in overthrowing the regime.
Both Egypt and Tunisia share the same trigger factors of social media (Facebook, Twitter, etc.), rising food prices, and high unemployment, especially among the college educated. In political science literature, the latter is a classic feature of Third World revolutions.
Wall Street Cheatsheet has identified 11 countries that have the same trigger factors as Egypt and may be the next dominoes to fall.
H/t beloved Fellowship co-founder Steve.
~Eowyn

 


violence escalates in Egypt


 
From “Your Cheat Sheet to the 11 Countries Which Could Follow Egypt’s Lead,” by Business Insider, Wall Street Cheatsheet, Feb 1, 2011:
1. MOROCCO:

  • Style of government: Constitutional Monarchy
  • Inflation: 2.6% year-over-year in December
  • Unemployment: Among graduates, 25%, Total rate at 9.1%
  • Social media: Very much a serious part of youth culture
  • Conclusion: Morocco’s government has already undergone democratic reforms, so any political pressure would likely be responded to in a similar manner, with more reforms. Those very reforms have been suggested by a government commission, so Morocco seems pretty safe at the moment, prepared to adjust if things get out of hand. 

2. JORDAN:

  • Style of government: Constitutional monarchy, incorporating limited democracy
  • Inflation: Jordanian inflation up 6.1% year-over-year in December, 1.2% month-over-month
  • Unemployment: Around 14%
  • Social media: 38-39% of Jordanians have internet access
  • Conclusion: Jordan is already experiencing protests related to these factors. The government is responding by providing food and fuel subsidies. King Abdullah just sacked his government and appointed a new one with reforms priority number one. Whether the government moves fast enough to implement these reforms will be the deciding factor in the future size of protests and threat to the regime.

3. SYRIA:

  • Style of government: Single party authoritarian, President Bashar al-Assad
  • Inflation: Government intends to take action to lower prices
  • Unemployment: 8.1% in 2009
  • Social media: Facebook still openly used by the public, searches for Egypt on computers, however, crash them.
  • Conclusion: The economic situation is not as dire in Syria as in other countries. The regime is, arguably, more ruthless than its Egyptian counterpart. The President believes his partnership with Iran and support for the Palestinian cause will keep him safe, and he’s already pushing for reforms. Syria’s state may be too powerful for the little protest movement developing to flourish.

4. SAUDI ARABIA:

  • Style of government: Absolute Monarchy
  • Inflation: Inflation at 5.4% in December, down from November
  • Unemployment: 10% in 2010
  • Social media: 3 million Saudi Arabians are on Facebook, with Twitter usage increasing quickly
  • Conclusion: Saudi Arabia has seen some small protests, but over the government response to flooding, not rising costs and unemployment. There are concerns on the streets that the country doesn’t have proper infrastructure and is recklessly spending its oil riches. The repressive regime is unlikely to fall under these smaller concerns, but its youth unemployment problem (42%) and religious minority (Shia) could eventually exert real pressure.

5. IRAN:

  • Style of government: Islamic Republic, with democratically elected representatives. Less than certain how “democratic” elections truly are. Ruled by Supreme Leader, who is a both religious and political leader.
  • Inflation: Inflation at 13.5% in early 2010, may be more than double that level
  • Unemployment: 14.6% as of August 
  • Social media: Significant penetration of both Twitter and Facebook. Government showed willingness to crackdown on use during previous protest movement.
  • Conclusion: Iran crushed its most recent protest movement. If inflation continues to rise, the sentiment may become more popular, and Egypt’s revolution could inspire Iranians back to the streets.

6. LIBYA:

  • Style of government: Authoritarian, led by Muammar al-Gaddafi
  • Inflation: CPI up 2.654% in 2009
  • Unemployment: Highest unemployment rate in North Africa
  • Social media: The Muslim Brotherhood has a Facebook page. Unknown levels of internet penetration.
  • Conclusion: Libya would seem a good bet. It’s stuck between revolutionary Tunisia and Egypt. Its leader is regarded as an international eccentric. He wants his son to take over, and the public’s not pleased. Financial squalor is probably worse than estimated. Whether or not social media could assist is unknown, but Libya is a likely future front in the spillover.

7. YEMEN:

  • Style of government: Presidential democracy, elections not entirely free
  • Inflation: No data of note, though likely higher that the 5.4% projection
  • Unemployment: 40%
  • Social media: 2.2 million internet users, population 23.4 million
  • Conclusion: Yemen has the deepest unemployment problem in the region, and likely a serious inflation problem too. There’s a large terrorist group in the country, as it is a headquarters for Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula. Protests are already significant. There is a sincere liklihood of change here, or, and this might be worse, further radicalisation of the population.

8. PAKISTAN:

  • Style of government: Democratic republic
  • Inflation: Over 15%
  • Unemployment: 14% in 2010 (estimate)
  • Social media: Heavy use, government has banned use over the depiction of Mohamed before.
  • Conclusion: Pakistan has a serious economic crisis, a weakness of state shown in recent flooding, confused positions over the U.S. and Taliban, as well as large anti-government, pro-Muslim fundamentalist forces. The potential for change is there. The biggest power source remains the military, however, and another coup, similar to the one that brought Musharaf to power, could occur.

9. VIETNAM:

  • Style of government: Authoritarian capitalism
  • Inflation: High inflation, including rising food costs
  • Unemployment: 6.5%
  • Social media: Blogs, Facebook, and other social media venues are prevalent
  • Conclusion: In Asia, Vietnam looks a likely candidate for protests, particularly if the economy slows down and unemployment increases. The economic trigger for a downturn would need to be pulled, however, before any change would take place.

10. VENEZUELA:

  • Style of government: Authoritarian republic
  • Inflation: 27.2% in 2010
  • Unemployment: 8.1% in the first 10 months of 2010
  • Social media: It exists, and Chavez has a Twitter account.
  • Conclusion: The economic numbers scream change, but there’s no way to know whether or not Chavez has outstayed his welcome. The country hasn’t had the same, long-term oppressive experience as a country like Egypt. And its leadership still appeals to the anti-American sentiment held by the populace.
  •  

11. CHINA:

  • Style of government: Authoritarian
  • Inflation: China has a serious inflation problem, with food prices at the forefront.
  • Unemployment: 4.2% [official figure; real unofficial unemployment is much higher. -Eowyn]
  • Social media: Significant penetration, but government aggressively censors
  • Conclusion: China has all the ingredients except the big one: unemployment. Now, there’s no guarantee rural China won’t see an uprising related to soaring prices and high unemployment there, but it’s unlikely to be passed on to the country’s cities. It would take a massive economic downturn, like one created by a liquidity crisis leading to a banking crisis leading to a recession, to trigger an unemployment surge that would threaten the regime.
Please follow and like us:
0