Tag Archives: toxic masculinity

Libtard Michael Ian Black to write book on “rethinking masculinity”

michael ian black

HAHAHAHAHAHAHA!

This guy is a comedian, atheist and has full-blown TDS. He wrote a book in July 2016 called, “A Child’s First Book of Trump.” From the book:

“What do you do when you spot a wild Trump in the election season? New York Times bestselling author and comedian Michael Ian Black has some sage advice for children (and all the rest of us who are scratching our heads in disbelief) in this perfectly timely parody picture book intended for adults that would be hysterical if it wasn’t so true.

The beasty is called an American Trump. Its skin is bright orange, its figure is plump. Its fur so complex you might get enveloped. Its hands though are, sadly, underdeveloped.

The Trump is a curious creature, very often spotted in the wild, but confounding to our youngest citizens. A business mogul, reality TV host, and now…political candidate? Kids (and let’s be honest many adults) might have difficulty discerning just what this thing that’s been dominating news coverage this election cycle is. Could he actually be real? Are those…words coming out of his mouth? Why are his hands so tiny? And perhaps most importantly, what on earth do you do when you encounter an American Trump?

With his signature wit and a classic picture book style, comedian Michael Ian Black introduces those unfamiliar with the Americus Trumpus to his distinguishing features and his mystifying campaign for world domination…sorry…President of the United States.”

Yesterday after SCJ Kennedy announced his retirement Black tweeted, “Stock up on abortions. Roe v. Wade is gone.”

What a masculine man he is.

From Page Six: Michael Ian Black‘s next book will have some advice for his fellow men.

The multitalented comedian and writer’s “A Better Man” is scheduled to come out in the fall of 2019, Algonquin Books told The Associated Press on Tuesday. The book will be an open letter to his teenage son that calls for “rethinking masculinity” and how to love and be loved.

Black’s credits range from “The Jim Gaffigan Show” to such books as the memoir “You’re Not Doing It Right.”

He is also the host of two podcasts, “How to Be Amazing” and “Obscure.”

DCG

Saturday funny: Colorado demorat candidate douses his eyes w/pepper spray to push for gun control

This is the type of people Obama had working for him.

About this fool, from Wikipedia:

“Levi Mills Tillemann-Dick is an American businessman, academic, and author. Currently managing partner at Valence Strategic, LLC and a fellow at the New America Foundation, he is also the author of the 2015 book, The Great Race: The Global Quest For The Car Of The Future (Simon and Schuster). Levi was also the lead author of the report Revolution Now, which he published while working in President Barack Obama‘s Department of Energy. After forming an exploratory committee in May 2017 to examine the feasibility of a congressional bid in Colorado’s 6th congressional district, Levi officially announced his candidacy in late June.”

Levi calls himself unapologetically progressive. To cure  gun violence, he wants to ban assault weapons, get “warfare” ammo off the street, address “toxic masculinity” and end global arms trade.

Ya got me Levi with this little stunt.  I’m surrendering all my firearms now after seeing that!

NOT.

h/t Twitchy

DCG

Gavin Newsom addresses his affair in context of #MeToo era

gavin newsom sabo art

One little detail Newsom didn’t mention in his “#MeToo” moment: The woman Newsom had an affair with, Ruby Rippey-Tourk, was the wife of his friend and campaign manager, Alex Tourk.

From SF Gate: In the backdrop of the #MeToo movement, when several politicians have been routed from office for sexually inappropriate behavior from years ago, Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom offered an answer for voters who might be hesitant to support him for governor because of a 2007 affair he had with a subordinate while he was mayor of San Francisco.

“I would say the same thing that I said (then) to the voters in San Francisco: that I acknowledged it. I apologized for it. I learned an enormous amount from it,” Newsom said Monday during an onstage interview at the University of San Francisco. “And I am every day trying to be a champion and a model — not just for women and girls — but to deal with the issue that we need to focus on, which is the crisis with men and boys in this state and in this country.” He described a culture of “toxic masculinity” where men are responsible for much of the violence in the nation.

In 2007, Newsom — who was then separated from his first wife, Kimberly Guilfoyle — publicly apologized for having a consensual affair with Ruby Rippey-Tourk, who was then his commission appointments secretary.

A subsequent City Attorney’s Office report into whether it was proper for Rippey-Tourk to receive $10,154 in “catastrophic illness pay” from the city after she left her job after the affair, uncovered nothing illegal, but raised questions about whether she should have been eligible for the payments. According to the report, the pay was based on her acceptance into the city’s Catastrophic Illness Program, or CIP.

The report said it is supposed to be offered to employees with “a life-threatening illness or injury, as determined by the Department of Public Health” to “reduce hardship and suffering of catastrophically ill city employees.” The report questioned whether Rippey-Tourk, who took leave from City Hall in May 2006 to enter a substance abuse program, should have been eligible for that program.

Newsom was speaking Thursday at the University of San Francisco as part of the university’s series of one-on-one interviews with the top gubernatorial candidates co-sponsored by Politico and the school’s Leo T. McCarthy Center for Public Service and the Common Good.

Asked by Politico’s Carla Marinucci, who conducted the interview, whether he had any similar transgressions since that time, Newsom said, “Of course not.”

He applauded the courage of the women who have publicly called out inappropriate sexual behavior in Sacramento.

Last week, the state Senate and Assembly released documents revealing 20 substantiated complaints of sexual harassment or inappropriate behavior against lawmakers or high-level legislative staffers over the past 12 years. They included cases against six current and former elected officials, including one of Newsom’s gubernatorial candidate rivals — Assemblyman Travis Allen, R-Huntington Beach (Orange County). Allen was found to have routinely gotten “unnecessarily close” to one female staffer in 2013, including sitting close to her while sliding his foot to touch hers.

In a statement, Allen said, “There has never been anything in any of my actions that has been inappropriate, and nor will there ever be.”

On policy, Newsom said Monday that he would make addressing homelessness a focus of his governorship and outlined several ways he would address the problem, including appointing a statewide homeless czar (Hey Newsom: See Seattle and how well that idea has worked for them).

That leadership has been lacking for decades in California,” Newsom said. “There has been no intentionality supporting local and regional efforts to address the issue of homelessness emanating from Sacramento. None. There are no statewide goals to end homelessness. There is no vision to end homelessness in the state of California.

“I’m going to step up significantly on this issue,” he said.

With $19.5 million in the bank, Newsom has a vast fundraising lead over his opponents and is the early poll leader, too. Newsom was the top choice of 26 percent of the likely voters responding to a December 2017 Berkeley IGS Poll, with Villaraigosa at 17 percent. Two Republicans — Rancho Santa Fe businessman John Cox and Allen, R-Huntington Beach — each grabbed 9 percent, with Chiang and former Superintendent of Public Instruction Eastin each getting 5 percent. Another candidate, former Sacramento-area GOP Rep. Doug Ose, entered the race in January and was not included in the polling.

DCG

Libtard Alec Baldwin has drink-throwing meltdown on NYC street

alec baldwin

Alec is headlining an Iowa demorat fundraiser this fall.

This demorat needs to learn to control his “toxic masculinity.”

From NY Post: Explosive actor Alec Baldwin had another epic meltdown on the streets of New York this week.

A fellow pedestrian at University Place and 11th Street tells us that the “30 Rock” star was seen in a verbal exchange with a presumably reckless motorist that included insults and soft-drink throwing.

“Baldwin called the driver of a big black SUV ‘a meatball’ and kept asking him and the passenger to get out,” said the witness, who noticed the incident after it had already begun.

When the people in the SUV wouldn’t get out, “Alec got out his phone and started videotaping them. They pulled away right after, and he took a pic of their license plate and threw his extra-large drink in the street. Then he just went on his angry way.

Baldwin’s rep had no comment.

In 2014, the actor was arrested in the same area for biking the wrong way down Fifth Avenue and reportedly becoming “belligerent and . . . arguing” with cops.

He also went on a Twitter tirade against an Upper West Side Starbucks barista in 2011, and delivered a homophobic rant against a Post photographer in 2013.

DCG

Isn’t this special: Justin Trudeau is raising his kids to be feminists

justin trudea and hillary clinton

Justin Trudeau with his “feminist” buddy Hillary

Questions for Justin:

From what I’ve seen in the world, women face unequal obstacles every day because the left’s definition of feminism is enabling men and women to silence, demean and belittle people of both genders. Their quest for power is silencing vulnerable voices every day.

From Marie Claire (by Justin Trudeau): I am in politics because every day, I get to work to make the world a little better—for my kids, and for yours. I’m proud of the dedicated work our team is doing to make Canada more open, more inclusive, more just—and gender equal. But some of the most important work I do is not as a political leader, but as a parent. Every day, at home, I have the astonishing and humbling opportunity—together with my wife Sophie—to nurture empathy, compassion, self-love, and a keen sense of justice in our three kids.

I am so exceptionally proud of my daughter Ella-Grace. She’s growing up kind, super-smart, a passionate debater, open to the world around her. I love Ella, and I worry—because as a father, son, husband, and citizen, I witness the unequal obstacles women and girls face every day. It’s 2017, yet in Canada and around the world, women and girls still face violence, discrimination, stereotypes that limit them, and unequal opportunities that keep them from achieving their dreams. It is maddening to me that my brilliant, compassionate daughter will grow up in a world where, despite everything she is as a person, there will still be people who won’t take her voice seriously, who will write her off—simply because of her gender.

I can—and do—work every day to shift those inequalities, even incrementally. But I also know that the most powerful medicine will come from Ella herself. Sophie and I can’t be there with Ella at every hard moment of her life—to protect her when someone makes her feel small, to advocate for her when someone isn’t listening—even if we wish we could. (Parents will relate.) So the best thing we can do is to help Ella learn, unshakeably, that she is enough, exactly as she is. That she has immense power, and intrinsic worth, which no one can ever take away from her. That she has a strong voice, which she can use, and trust.

That means raising her feminist. Full stop.

I’m eternally lucky to have an amazing partner in that project. Sophie continues to inspire and challenge me, and a few years ago, she helped me reach a turning point. I was talking about teaching Ella that she can be anything she wants to be. Sophie said, “That’s great—but how are you raising your sons to be strong advocates for women and girls, too?”

Gender equality is not only an issue for women and girls. All of us benefit when women and girls have the same opportunities as men and boys—and it’s on all of us to make that a reality. Our sons have the power and the responsibility to change our culture of sexism, and I want Xavier and Hadrien—when he’s a little older—to understand that deeply. But I want, too, to help them grow into empathetic young people and adults, strong allies who walk through the world with openness, love, and a fierce attachment to justice. I want my sons to escape the pressure to be a particular kind of masculine that is so damaging to men and to the people around them. I want them to be comfortable being themselves, and being feminists—who stand up for what’s right, and who can look themselves in the eye with pride.

Feminism is not just the belief that men and women are equal. It’s the knowledge that when we are all equal, all of us are more free. It’s a relentless commitment to look for ourselves in each other, because that’s how we start to build a world where everyone is treated with respect and recognition. And it’s the unwavering conviction that all people have the same rights and freedoms—that my rights are your rights, and it is only when your rights are fully protected that mine are, too.

That world doesn’t exist yet. But it can be built—by people who have a strong sense of justice and empathy, who stand up for the rights of others, and who seek out their own unique ways of creating more inclusive communities.

That’s the world we want to live in. That’s the world we want our kids to live in. To raise our kids feminist is to recognize that they ALL have a part to play to build that world. To raise our kids feminist is to honor their future, because they have the responsibility—and the power—to shape it for the better.

DCG

Feminists are insufferable: Tweet of a man rescuing a woman and child is “sexist”

houston rescue

Toxic masculinity at work in Houston/AP Photo

A picture of a man rescuing a woman and her child in the Hurricane Harvey tragedy surfaced on the internet (see the above precious photo). It has caused much scorn for the feminists and gender study professors about the role of men and women in society.

Matt Walsh, a columnist for The Blaze, tweeted out the above picture with the caption, “Woman cradles and protects child. Man carries and protects both. This is how it ought to be, despite what your gender studies professor says”

This tweet and the accompanying photo set the internet ablaze with cries of his tweet being “sexist,” “outdated” and “misogynistic.”

Time Magazine (via Fortune) had an “actual gender studies professor” weigh in on the “controversial” tweet.  Christina Wolbrecht, associate professor in the Department of Political Science and director of the Program of American Democracy at the University of Notre Dame, responded to Walsh’s message in a series of 12 tweets.

Here’s what the gender studies professor had to say:

Care work (for children, infirm, elderly) is necessary for human flourishing & has been traditionally performed by women for free, which contributes to women’s lesser financial & politics power. As care work has moved into the market, it remains poorly paid & overwhelmingly female, which again makes women more vulnerable. We [love] to laud a woman “cradling her child” but don’t provide paid maternity leave or support quality childcare & good pay/benefits for childcare workers (women, immigrants). But wait! There’s more! As budgets for care work (mental health, health care) have been cut, a lot of that work has shifted to agencies like police & fire, who often lack training & capacity, and result in troubling outcomes. At same time, economists note that a central challenge to male workers is skills mismatch – men reluctant to take jobs in expanding care sector, partly bc jobs are “female”, partly bc they are low paying, low prestige (bc their “women’s jobs”). IN SUM your rigid and illogical sexual division of labor, & related hierarchy of value, hurts both women & men, the US economy, & the flourishing of society as a whole. The value of work – holding the baby or carrying the mother should be recognized & rewarded, no matter who performs it. Given how much care is needed, all hands on deck.”

If I am mistaken, I believe Mark’s original tweet DID recognize and reward the mom for protecting her child. But that’s not good enough for the libtards who can’t see the natural and instinctual beauty in a man rescuing and protecting a mother and child.

Of course, the idea that a man should have to rescue a woman and child is a NO NO for feminists. In their minds, we need to erase the social and cultural constructions of masculinity. After all, they don’t need a man to save them!

Here’s the difference between feminists and conservative women (who absolutely LOVED that tweet/photo): We understand the physical and mental differences that God gives men and women. God designed the fundamental biology of each sex for specific reasons that we should celebrate.

We completely adore the strong men in our lives who protect us, shelter us, love us, and would give their lives for us. We value them for being the testosterone-filled manly-men that they are!

IN SUM, this toxic masculinity is a beautiful thing!

DCG

Men’s Grooming Guru: ‘Masculinity Is So Fragile, It’s So Toxic’

david yi

The feminist and beauty guru, David Yi


Um, no. I want a real man, not a genderless and sexually fluid feminist.

From Yahoo: David Yi, the founder of a men’s beauty and grooming online destination for millennials and Generation Z called Very Good Light, cultivated a love for skin care and grooming at a young age.

“Being a Korean-American, we were slathered with SPF. Ever since I was a child, my mom and dad showed us how important skin care was,” Yi tells Yahoo Beauty. “They knew beauty was something that came from the inside out, but people take notice of your skin. Skin care is about pampering yourself. You have to be your biggest ally and supporter before anyone else. It’s an inner confidence that pushes you through the entire day.”

After stints as a writer and editor for media outlets like Mashable, WWD, and the Daily News, Yi decided to address the huge gap in the beauty industry for men and personal care. “I felt that there needed to be a new voice, especially for Generation Z. This generation is more genderless and sexually fluid than any other generation.”

So Yi created Very Good Light to fill that void. “I launched something to cater to that guy who felt he didn’t fit into that definition of ‘masculinity‘ or the confines of what it means to be a male in 2017,” he says. “It’s all about inclusivity, celebrating who you are and who you want to be; normalizing men and their behaviors, normalizing makeup, normalizing beauty, and that everyone has a place to call home.”

However, Yi stresses that Very Good Light does not cater to just one “type” of man. He explains, “We don’t have to sell it out as an ‘inclusive’ and ‘woke’ brand. We want that to exude through our site and the content we produce.”

He continues, “I think the biggest misconception is that the site is only LGBTQ-related, and it’s not. If you’re in tune with your body and face, and you like to pamper yourself, that doesn’t make you one thing or another. It’s pretty judgmental to box someone into a sexual category just based off their morning skin care routine or what grooming products they use. I want to tear that down or the notion that beauty is only for a specific individual.”

These archaic notions of men and pampering are simply “fractions of fragile masculinity,” according to Yi. He says, “Right now, masculinity is so fragile, it’s so toxic. I feel once we shatter those stereotypes and get out of those confines, that is what will push us forward. Once we start changing men and making them ‘feminists,’ making them allies for people of color or the LGBTQ community, that’s when the world starts to change.

Celebrities like Young Thug and Jaden Smith have helped redefine gender-fluidity through fashion. “These are young men who are swaggy, at the top of their game, and whose masculinity is never going to be questioned. They are blurring the lines between genders; they wear womenswear, and they don’t care what people think. I feel like they are the ‘poster children’ for Generation Z and what that generation stands for. It’s about being bold, brass, brazen, and expressing yourself in an authentic way.”

Of course, websites like Very Good Light, no matter how “progressive,” have faced adversity. “People thought it was a brilliant idea that was vital, but there’s definitely been push back. Being a men’s grooming site, in general, a lot of people can’t understand that. In small town or rural cities, they may not understand the movement of men’s beauty or gender and sexual fluidity.” 

Question for you Mr. Yi: Do those who live in the small towns of the sandbox understand men’s beauty and gender and sexual fluidity? Are the citizens of the sandbox inclusive? Are they “woke?” Maybe they just don’t understand…

h/t to my toxic masculine boyfriend who lives in a small town in the USA😊

DCG