Tag Archives: symptoms of coronavirus COVID-19

Friday funnies & how to de-stress yourself from the Wuhan coronavirus

All of California, the most populous state in the U.S., is now in lockdown, which means 40 million people — especially the elderly, those with existing medical conditions such as diabetes, respiratory and coronary diseases — are told to “shelter in place,” i.e., to stay in their homes, except for going out for “essential” reasons, such as grocery-shopping and medical emergencies.

Whatever you may think of this virus, its effects are real and terrible even for the young.

Below is a harrowing description from a 25-year-old Brit, Connor Reed, who was working in Wuhan, China, when he came down with the demon virus last November, months before the Chinese Communist government told the world about the virus (Daily Mail):

Connor Reed

Day 1 — Monday November 25: I have a cold. I’m sneezing and my eyes are a bit bleary. It isn’t bad enough to keep me off work. I arrived in this country to teach English as a foreign language — but now I’m a manager at a school in Wuhan, the city in central China where I have lived for the past seven months.

I speak Mandarin well, and the job is interesting. My cold shouldn’t be very contagious, so I have no qualms about going to work. And I live alone, so I’m not likely to give it to anyone. There hasn’t been anything in the news here about viruses. I have no cause for concern. It’s just a sniffle….

Day 5: I’m over my cold. It really wasn’t anything.

Day 7: I spoke too soon. I feel dreadful. This is no longer just a cold. I ache all over, my head is thumping, my eyes are burning, my throat is constricted. The cold has travelled down to my chest and I have a hacking cough…. The symptoms hit me this afternoon like a train…. Even getting out of bed hurts. I am propped up on pillows, watching TV and trying not to cough too much because it is painful.

Day 9: …I’ve lost my appetite too.

Day 10: I’m still running a temperature. I’ve finished the quarter-bottle of whisky, and I don’t feel well enough to go out and get any more. It doesn’t matter: I don’t think hot toddies were making much difference.

Day 11: Suddenly, I’m feeling better, physically at least. The flu has lifted….

Day 12: I’ve had a relapse. Just as I thought the flu was getting better, it has come back with a vengeance. My breathing is laboured. Just getting up and going to the bathroom leaves me panting and exhausted. I’m sweating, burning up, dizzy and shivering. The television is on but I can’t make sense of it. This is a nightmare.

By the afternoon, I feel like I am suffocating. I have never been this ill in my life. I can’t take more than sips of air and, when I breathe out, my lungs sound like a paper bag being crumpled up. This isn’t right. I need to see a doctor. But if I call the emergency services, I’ll have to pay for the ambulance call-out myself. That’s going to cost a fortune. I’m ill, but I don’t think I’m dying — am I?

Surely I can survive a taxi journey. I decide to go to Zhongnan University Hospital because there are plenty of foreign doctors there, studying. It isn’t rational but, in my feverish state, I want to see a British doctor. My Mandarin is pretty good, so I have no language problem when I call the taxi. It’s a 20-minute ride. As soon as I get there, a doctor diagnoses pneumonia. So that’s why my lungs are making that noise. I am sent for a battery of tests lasting six hours.

Day 13: I arrived back at my apartment late yesterday evening. The doctor prescribed antibiotics for the pneumonia but I’m reluctant to take them — I’m worried that my body will become resistant to the drugs and, if I ever get really ill and need them, they won’t work. I prefer to beat this with traditional remedies if I can.

It helps, simply knowing that this is pneumonia. I’m only 25 and generally healthy: I tell myself there’s no reason for alarm. I have some Tiger Balm. It’s like Vick’s vapour rub on steroids. I pour some into a bowl of hot water and sit with a towel over my head, inhaling the fumes. I’m going ‘old school’. And I’ve still got the antibiotics in reserve if I need them….

Day 15: All the days are now blurring into one….

Day 17: I am feeling slightly better, but I don’t want to get my hopes up yet. I’ve been here before.

Day 18: My lungs no longer sound like bundles of broken twigs.

Day 19: I am well enough to stagger out of doors to get more Tiger Balm. My nose has cleared enough to smell what my neighbours are cooking, and I think I might have an appetite for the first time in nearly two weeks.

Day 22: I was hoping to be back at work today but no such luck. The pneumonia has gone — but now I ache as if I’ve been run over by a steamroller.My sinuses are agony, and my eardrums feel ready to pop. I know I shouldn’t but I’m massaging my inner ear with cotton buds, trying to take the pain away.

Day 24: Hallelujah! I think I’m better. Who knew flu could be as horrible as that, though?….

Day 36: A tip-off from a friend sends me hurrying to the shops. Apparently, the Chinese officials are concerned about a new virus that is taking hold in the city. There are rumours about a curfew or travel restrictions. I know what this will mean — panic buying in the shops. I need to stock up on essentials before everyone else does.

Day 37: The rumours were right. Everyone is being told to stay indoors. From what I’ve heard, the virus is like a nasty dose of flu that can cause pneumonia. Well, that sounds familiar.

Day 52: A notification from the hospital informs me that I was infected with the Wuhan coronavirus….

Day 67: The whole world has now heard about coronavirus.

As the Wuhan coronavirus pandemic rages on, wreaking inestimable and unprecedented havoc and destruction to the economy and jobs, we each must do our best to protect our immune system. Stress is lethal, because it impairs our immune system — and our immune system must be strong and healthy to better withstand this demon virus. Here are some pointers:

(1) Avoid stress, and if you are under stress, make sure you find ways to calm down and relax. Studies have shown that meditation helps — and PRAYING is a form of meditation.

(2) Eat healthy: When we’re under stress, being human we tend to over-indulge in “comfort” and junk food. Alas, that will just make things worse. So make sure you are eating healthy in these trying times. That means plenty of veggies, fruits, whole grains and lean meat. And go easy on the alcohol. Your body will thank you, and you’ll also feel healthier, cleaner, and stronger.

(3) Exercise: Some of us are ordered to “shelter in place,” which means going to the gym is a no-no. So exercise in the outdoors: walking, running, bicycling….

(4) Sleep: Studies have shown that sleep deficit can be deadly. See “Sleepless in America: Health dangers of less than 8 hr/night sleep”.

Here are some funnies to de-stress and enhance our immune system!

And the best for last.

I guarantee you will LOL. 😀

For more coronavirus funnies, see:

~Eowyn

Drudge Report has gone to the dark side. Check out Whatfinger News, the Internet’s conservative frontpage founded by a military veteran!

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Wednesday Funnies! – and the coronavirus hysteria

I got a text this morning from a friend who says she’s self-quarantining herself (14 days) because yesterday while shopping in Costco, a woman “coughed on” her. My friend lives in a city with just one confirmed case of COVID-19 — a middle-aged man who recently returned from Italy.

Such is the media-driven hysteria about the COVID-19 coronavirus.

While Americans are driven into a panic about coronavirus, here are some funnies to release your stress and tension!

P.S. This is what I texted back to my self-quarantined friend:

You have given into the media-driven hysteria. The CDC recommends self-quarantine only if (a) you have symptomatic laboratory-confirmed COVID-19; or (b) you are under investigation for having COVID-19. See CDC’s Q&A on coronavirus/COVID-19.

Some points:

  1. Your city has only one confirmed case of COVID-19, so the probability of coughing woman having it is low.
  2. Did coughing woman display other symptoms of COVID-19 such as shortness of breath/difficulty breathing?
  3. Was her cough dry or wet (with mucous discharge)? If wet then it’s likely not COVID-19.
  4. Did you touch your face or mouth after being coughed on?
  5. Did you wash your hands or wipe them with an antibacterial alcohol-based hand sanitizer?

Here are the symptoms of COVID-19 (CDC):

The most common symptoms of COVID-19 are fever, tiredness, and dry cough. Some patients may have aches and pains, nasal congestion, runny nose, sore throat or diarrhea. These symptoms are usually mild and begin gradually. Some people become infected but don’t develop any symptoms and don’t feel unwell. Most people (about 80%) recover from the disease without needing special treatment. Around 1 out of every 6 people who gets COVID-19 becomes seriously ill and develops difficulty breathing. Older people, and those with underlying medical problems like high blood pressure, heart problems or diabetes, are more likely to develop serious illness. People with fever, cough and difficulty breathing should seek medical attention.

See also:

~Eowyn

Drudge Report has gone to the dark side. Check out Whatfinger News, the Internet’s conservative frontpage founded by a military veteran!

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