Tag Archives: suicide

Seattle-King County Public Health want doctors to be more inquisitive into patient firearm access/ownership

guns

On Tuesday, Seattle-King County Public Health published a statement with their intent to decrease gun violence. The blog was posted by Dr. Jeff Duchin, Health Officer for Public Health – Seattle & King County.

About Dr. Duchin: “Jeff served for over 15 years as Chief of the Public Health’s Communicable Disease Epidemiology & Immunization Section. Jeff trained as a Medical Epidemiologist in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) after which he completed the CDC’s Preventive Medicine Residency program.”

See his full bio here.

The doctor is on Twitter. Here’s a few of his tweets:

The blog post by Seattle-King County Public Health talks about suicide and firearm-related injuries including statistics, deaths  and costs to taxpayers. Read the full blog post here.

Here are excerpts from the agency’s new pledge:

“For that reason, Public Health is joining with leading medical professional associations to form a new collaboration with a renewed commitment to decrease firearm-related injury and deaths by working together and using a public health approach.

Prevention is the core of a public health approach, and firearm injuries and deaths can be prevented. We must address prevention of firearm-related injuries in the same way we do for other types of injuries, poisonings, and infectious and chronic diseases, using a public health approach that includes:

  • Screening to identify patients with risk factors for firearm-related injury
  • Educating patients and families about risk factors, firearm safety and injury prevention as we do for other diseases and causes of injury – gun owners and non-gun owners alike understand the importance of firearm safety
  • Gathering data and conducting research on risk and protective factors for firearm related injury and death in order to make evidence-based recommendations and strategies
  • Promoting the adoption of successful prevention strategies, including those addressing upstream drivers of violence, such as childhood abuse, neglect and trauma, poverty, substance use disorders, disrupted families and communities, and being a victim of violence
  • Fostering multidisciplinary and community collaborations with stakeholders interested in reducing firearm-related injury and death, including gun-owners

The medical community has an important role in this work.  You can read our joint statement, which includes a description of our approach and examples of actions healthcare providers can take to reduce firearm-related injury and death, at http://www.kingcounty.gov/firearm-injuries-ph. 

(WARNING: I tried clicking on the link to read the document and each time I did my computer froze. Not sure if it’s just my computer or the Public Health link.)

This collaboration among healthcare provider professional organizations is the first of many steps local and statewide medical professionals can take together to reduce firearm injury and death in our communities. We invite other healthcare professional organizations to join us by endorsing our statement and/or participating in our future work.”

MyNorthwest.com has some more details:

“Those efforts include joining with experts at Harborview Injury Prevention and Research Center, Washington State Medical Association, King County Medical Society, and other state and local medical groups to recommend more screening and education for patients of all ages, including everything from identifying risk factors to talking to them about the importance of safely storing guns.

It recommends medical professionals should also respect beliefs of lawful firearm owners in order to effectively communicate. Also, to use healthcare providers who are also gun owners to provide leadership and knowledge on the issue.


I wonder if any of the “data” gathered by doctors could be used in the future to determine if compliance is being achieved with Mayor Durkan’s proposed new gun legislation?

DCG

Vogue magazine asks, “Should we still let children play with toy guns?”

It’s the “Classic Mother BB Gun Block.”

Pro-tip for the women cited in this article: We have THOUSANDS of strict gun laws already on the books. The problem is enforcement and those darn criminals who don’t obey them.

And if you’re interested in teaching your child about proper firearm safety instead of an irrational fear, there are LOTS of resources available. For example, see here, here, here, here, here and here.

From Yahoo (originally from Vogue): Over the weekend, on a party supplies run at Flying Tiger, the charming Danish discount store, my 4-year-old daughter’s eyes sparkled at the sight of a neon-color water gun. “Can I have that?” she asked—the same question she’d repeated at the sight of the modeling clay and princess crowns and silly straws.

I wavered for a beat. I’d come of age in the late ’80s and ’90s—the height of the backyard Super Soaker battle. And before that water gun became the hottest ticket at Toys “R” Us, my brother and I had wielded tiny green plastic water pistols filled and refilled with rudimentary plugs, sneakily shooting each other in the eyes. I remember all of this as pure, absurd fun.

“No,” I told my daughter, and briskly steered her on.

I offered no explanation in the moment—and I hadn’t really turned the question over in my head before—but my gut gave me my answer: that I didn’t want to introduce her to this or any other gun in a world that already seemed to be teeming with them in movies and video games, on TV and, most of all, on the news. Her fleeting interest in the toy gun was innocent, but, sadly, my view of it no longer was.

The water gun fights my brother and I used to have in the summer were from another era, maybe even another world—before Columbine and Parkland; Orlando and Sutherland Springs; and before these much-covered mass shootings rightfully reminded the public of the regularly occurring violence in lower socioeconomic and minority communities.

Back then, guns might have been just toys; now, it’s impossible for me not to see them as charged with the trauma of recent events.

I considered that same question again today—should we let our children play with toy guns at a time when the U.S. is grappling with the impact of gun violence?—when I saw the pictures of Prince George holding a rather realistic-looking black toy gun at an English polo match over the weekend. Part of the debate over toy guns has hinged on distinguishing them, clearly, as toys—so as never to be mistaken for the real thing. There are state laws, including one in New York, requiring toy guns be brightly colored, as opposed to black, aluminum, or silver. Perhaps for this reason, the photos stood out: to some eyes, the prince’s looked eerily like a real pistol.

“I gasped when I saw the photos,” an American friend said on Facebook.

And she has a reason to: America has a gun violence homicide rate that is 25 times higher than that of other developed countries, according to Everytown for Gun Safety; we outrank all other countries in the number of mass shootings that occur here; we own an estimated half of all civilian guns worldwide. A child wielding a toy gun in the U.K., where firearms are much harder to obtain, arouses a different sense of shock or unease than they might in America, though no less alarming—remember the brouhaha when Pippa Middleton’s friend pointed a firearm out of their convertible at a paparazzi?

There’s also the matter of who’s holding the toy gun. “The photo of Prince George juxtaposed with the story of Tamir Rice, a young black boy killed by police in Ohio because he had a toy gun in hand is an important part of the racial and white supremacy dynamics at play here,” Erika Soto Lamb, the founding and former head of communications for Everytown and Moms Demand Action for Gun Safety and a mother of two sons, ages 5 and 7, told Vogue. “It’s not safe for a black child in America to play with toy guns.”

Soto Lamb is a Texas native who was raised around real guns; she grew up playing cops and robbers and revering A Christmas Story—the irreverent classic in which mischievous young Ralphie Parker dreams of his very own BB gun. But she does not allow her two sons to play with toy guns of any kind. While at Everytown and Moms Demand Action, “when my life was a daily deluge of news stories about gun violence in America, and working with mothers whose children had been killed, it was simply untenable to come home and hand my children guns to play with,” Soto Lamb said.

When I began asking other parents today about kids and toy guns, many echoed her uneasiness. “My daughter is just 3, but I don’t think a gun can be an innocent toy in this day and age,” Anna Davies, a fellow writer in Jersey City, New Jersey, told me. “It’s much easier to just not have them in our lives.”

Another friend said she was “uncomfortable” when her 5-year-old daughter recently received a toy water gun in a birthday party goodie bag. One mother stealthily returned a “machine-gun” toy loaded with foam pellets that her son received at his own birthday party. “It was designed to look like the real deal,” she said. “I was so horrified, I immediately stashed it away while he was busy tearing into his other gifts.”

I can hear the other side now: that parents denying their kids toy guns are overthinking this. That a toy is still just a toy. But if Barbies arguably possess the power to body shame little girls, and princesses can mess with their sense of independence, then can’t guns, even if just subliminally, sanction violence? “I believe we have a cultural problem with guns in this country, and I don’t want to normalize the use of them,” Kathy Healy Champion, a mother of three in Connecticut, said. She doesn’t allow her children to play with toy guns. “I see it as a step in the right direction.”

After Sandy Hook, Soto Lamb says she began to view A Christmas Story through a different lens: “I realized that America’s problem with gun violence goes deeper than any laws, there is a cultural shift that needs to happen,” she said. “We give them blocks to inspire them to be builders, we give them paint to inspire artistic expression . . . what are we feeding our children, in the metaphorical sense, when we hand them toy guys to play with?

It doesn’t have to be a real gun to spark debate: According to Apple, Google, Facebook, Microsoft, and Twitter, even emoji guns carry a certain charge that doesn’t necessarily belong in our texts or tweets: all of those companies scrapped their original gun emojis in favor of “water guns.” The TSA—Transportation Security Administration—recommends toy guns be packed with checked baggage; it bans “squirt guns, Nerf guns, toy swords, or other items that resemble realistic firearms or weapons.”

For some parents, the question of how to handle toy guns is ongoing—some allow just water guns and only of the bright-colored variety. Others have nuanced rules—that toy guns should never be pointed at people or used to pretend-kill someone. (But, then again, that’s usually the point of a gun, whether real or fake.) Some parents say the decision isn’t easy—one mother reluctantly allows her sons to partake in paintball gunning, so as not to make them feel left out among friends. The hardest part for Soto Lamb is banning water guns. “Water guns are really so fun, but let’s be honest, Super Soakers are basically assault weapon–style water guns,” she said. “We make do with water blasters”—long tubes with no trigger—“and water balloons.”

Several parents told me their concerns about toy guns tend to get dwarfed by their worry over real gun violence. Responding to some online backlash about Prince George’s toy gun, Davies said, “I wish the outrage would continue to be directed at the NRA, not Prince George and the royal family. Maybe if we lived in a society that had strict gun laws, our toddlers could also play with pretend guns. I think it’s actually something to aspire to—let’s become a society where guns are just as fantastical as lightsabers.”

DCG

Frustrated AMA adopts sweeping policies to cut gun violence

molon labe

A bunch of feel-good policies that do nothing but infringe upon our Constitutional rights.

From Yahoo:  (Chicago [oh, the irony starts right there]) – With frustration mounting over lawmakers’ inaction on gun control, the American Medical Association on Tuesday pressed for a ban on assault weapons and came out against arming teachers as a way to fight what it calls a public health crisis.

At its annual policymaking meeting, the nation’s largest physicians group bowed to unprecedented demands from doctor-members to take a stronger stand on gun violence — a problem the organizations says is as menacing as a lethal infectious disease.

The action comes against a backdrop of recurrent school shootings, everyday street violence in the nation’s inner cities, and rising U.S. suicide rates.

“We as physicians are the witnesses to the human toll of this disease,” Dr. Megan Ranney, an emergency-medicine specialist at Brown University, said at the meeting.

AMA delegates voted to adopt several of nearly a dozen gun-related proposals presented by doctor groups that are part of the AMA’s membership. They agreed to:

  • Support any bans on the purchase or possession of guns and ammunition by people under 21.
  • Back laws that would require licensing and safety courses for gun owners and registration of all firearms.
  • Press for legislation that would allow relatives of suicidal people or those who have threatened imminent violence to seek court-ordered removal of guns from the home.
  • Encourage better training for physicians in how to recognize patients at risk for suicide.
  • Push to eliminate loopholes in laws preventing the purchase or possession of guns by people found guilty of domestic violence, including expanding such measures to cover convicted stalkers.

Many AMA members are gun owners or supporters, including a doctor from Montana who told delegates of learning to shoot at a firing range in the basement of her middle school as part of gym class. But support for banning assault weapons was overwhelming, with the measure adopted in a 446-99 vote.

“There’s a place to start and this should be it,” Dr. Jim Hinsdale, a San Jose, California, trauma surgeon, said before the vote.

Gun violence is not a new issue for the AMA; it has supported past efforts to ban assault weapons; declared gun violence a public health crisis; backed background checks, waiting periods and better funding for mental health services; and pressed for more research on gun violence prevention.

But Dr. David Barbe, whose one-year term as AMA president ended Tuesday, called the number of related measures on this year’s agenda extraordinary and said recent violence, including the Parkland, Florida, school shooting and the Las Vegas massacre, “spurred a new sense of urgency … while Congress fails to act.”

“It has been frustrating that we have seen so little action from either state or federal legislators,” he said. “The most important audience for our message right now is our legislators, and second most important is the public, because sometimes it requires public pressure on the legislators.”

Read the rest of the story here.

DCG

About Asia Argento

Was Anthony Bourdain out of his mind to trust her?

If you are like me, you had hardly ever heard the name, Asia Argento, until Anthony Bourdain was already dead. 

WARNING: I also don’t know the maker of this video, and cannot vouch for his accuracy or truthfulness.

It seems there is much more to this story than a suicide or a murder. Is Hillary involved? I have no idea.

Is the devil involved?
Yes. Definitely yes.

 

Prominent gay rights lawyer burns himself to death to protest fossil fuel

david buckel sets self on fire

Wonder if he used biodiesel fuel to set himself on fire?

From Fox News: A “green” activist who was a pioneering lawyer for gay and transgender rights — including in the notorious “Boys Don’t Cry” rape murder case — committed suicide by setting himself on fire Saturday morning in Brooklyn’s Prospect Park in a grisly act of protest against the ecological destruction of the Earth.

David Buckel, 60, left behind a charred corpse and a typed suicide note that said he was burning himself to death using “fossil fuel” to reflect how mankind was likewise killing itself, police sources said.

He left the note in a manila envelope marked “To The Police,” recovered from inside a black metal pushcart he discarded at the scene.

“Most humans on the planet now breathe air made unhealthy by fossil fuels, and many die early deaths as a result,” Buckel wrote in his note, which he also sent to the New York Times.

“My early death by fossil fuel reflects what we are doing to ourselves.”

He added, “Honorable purpose in life invites honorable purpose in death.”

Passers-by were horrified to see Buckel’s burned remains. “It was just lying there, on its back, knees slightly bent like someone would lie on the sand at the beach,” said Irena Ryjova, 44, a rollerblader who passed by at about 7 a.m., less than an hour after the immolation.

“It’s a shock; it’s a shame,” said mom Dana Lall as she shepherded a crowd of Catholic-school kids past the horrific scene, en route to a baseball game.

As a senior attorney with Lambda Legal defense, Buckel was a lead lawyer in a 2000 lawsuit on behalf of transgender “Boys Don’t Cry” rape-murder victim Brandon Teena, helping the family recover additional damages from neglectful Nebraska law enforcement.

The 1999 movie earned Hilary Swank an Oscar for her portrayal of Teena. “It’s a very important case, not only within Nebraska but nationally,” Buckel had told the Daily Nebraskan newspaper in 2001, ­after helping win an $80,000 judgment.

DCG

Arkancide Strikes Again

Has Murder Incorporated just “suicided” a doctor related to the Haiti relief effort because of his complaint about Clinton corruption?

His daughter found him dead of a stab wound to the chest on December 10, 2017

NYDAILYNEWS: Doctor found dead with knife in chest inside Manhattan apartment while home alone with 11-year-old daughter

Dr. Dean Lorich, a trauma surgeon, was found dead with a knife in his torso inside his E. 96th St. apartment on Dec. 10, 2017. (BARRY WILLIAMS/FOR NEW YORK DAILY NEWS)

An acclaimed trauma surgeon was found dead, with a knife in his chest, by his 11-year-old daughter Sunday in his Park Ave. apartment, police said.

Investigators were treating the death of Dr. Dean Lorich as an apparent suicide, sources said.

“He was under some personal stress,” a police source said.

The surgeon was home with his daughter, police said, adding there were no signs of forced entry at the tony Upper East Side apartment at Park Ave. and E. 96th St.

Read Article: http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/manhattan/doctor-found-dead-knife-torso-nyc-apartment-article-1.3689775


Ruled a suicide? Hmmmm…

PEACE

Adult film star commits suicide after being bullied for refusing to have sex with man who did gay porn

august ames

August Ames bullied by the “tolerant” left

Well, this is sad. Sad that August chose porn as her career and that the PC crowd shamed her. She was labeled “homophobic.” Those SJW bullies must be so proud.

From Fox News: A porn star relentlessly bullied on Twitter after saying she did not want to have sex with someone who had shot gay porn committed suicide by hanging.

August Ames, a 23-year-old rising star in the adult film industry, died Tuesday in California. The Ventura County Medical Examiner confirmed to The Blast that Ames died of asphyxiation due to hanging.

“She was the kindest person I ever knew and she meant the world to me,” her husband, Kevin Moore, told industry trade magazine Adult Video News (AVN), which first reported the news. “Please leave this as a private family matter in this difficult time.”

According AVN, Ames joined the adult film industry in 2013 and steadily rose to prominence mostly thanks to a large following on social media.

Close friends told The Blast that they suspect her social media presence and recent harassment may have contributed to her death.

In recent days, Ames’ Twitter feed has been littered with cyberbullies accusing her of being homophobic after she publicly chose to not work with an unidentified actor who had previously shot gay porn.

“Whichever (lady) performer is replacing me tomorrow for @EroticaXnews, you’re shooting with a guy who has shot gay porn, just to let cha know. BS is all I can say,” she wrote in a tweet earlier this month. “Do agents really not care about who they’re representing? I do my homework for my body.”

The tweet garnered an onslaught of responses toward Ames, forcing her to defend her decision – and her words – against the PC mob.

“NOT homophobic. Most girls don’t shoot with guys who have shot gay porn, for safety,” she wrote. “That’s just how it is with me. I’m not putting my body at risk, I don’t know what they do in their private lives.”

In another tweet Ames wrote: “How am I homophobic if I myself am attracted to women? Not wanting to have sex with gay men is not homophonic; they don’t want to have sex with me either so byeeeee.”

“I don’t have anything to apologize for! Apologizing for taking extra steps to [ensure] that my body stays safe? F–k you guys for attacking me when none of my intentions were malicious. I f–king love the gay community! What the f–k ever! I CHOOSE who I have inside my body. No hate,” she wrote in another tweet.

After Ames’ death, fellow porn stars came to her defense and slammed the online mob bullying her.

“A beautiful life is GONE because people like to use their ‘fan base’ to bully others because THEIR opinion doesn’t agree with YOURS,” Brett Rossi, ex-girlfriend to actor Charlie Sheen wrote on Twitter. “RIP to a sweet, kind soul… I’m so sad & so angry. A life wasted simply because HER opinion didn’t mesh with YOURS.”

Anikka Albrite wrote: “Omg, I can’t believe she’s dead. You people should have known better than to berate her over her personal thoughts! Shame on all you for beating it into the ground. Online harassment is a real thing & it claimed another life. Someone who liked & would have even called a friend!”

DCG