Tag Archives: St. Valentine

S.F. postpones Nude Valentine Parade because of weather

You can’t make this stuff up.

It is 47°F in San Francisco. The forecast is rain showers and a high of 51°F.

Organizers of the Nude Valentine Parade 2019, scheduled at noon today in San Francisco, had to postpone it:

“The parade has been postponed because of bad weather during Valentine’s Week. It will be scheduled for a weekend when warmer, drier weather reaches San Francisco — probably in early March.”

Here’s the original announcement:

2019 Nude Valentine Parade

Saturday, Feb. 16, 2019 – 12 p.m.

Parade starts at Jane Warner Plaza, corner of Castro and Market streets, San Francisco, CA

From Fans of Urban Nudism:

“In San Francisco we celebrate Valentine’s Week – the week of love and friendship – with an annual Nude Valentine Parade.

“Why nude? Because it’s much more interesting and fun that way, and because nudity and love go well together. Furthermore, this is a way to reduce the harm that prudishness does to our society.

“The parade is free for anyone to join, to follow, or to watch. Anyone can participate – visitors and locals, all genders, all ages. Any degree of nudity is legal at this event, and many participants will only be wearing shoes.

“The 2019 Nude Valentine Parade will take place on Saturday February 16 — the Saturday following Valentine’s Day. The parade route starts in the Castro District – once famous as the center of gay love — and ends in the Haight-Ashbury District  — where the Summer of Love took place in the year 1967.

“The parade starts at Jane Warner Plaza (corner of Castro and Market Streets) at noon on Saturday February 16 (not the 14th, which is Valentine’s Day).

“We will walk from the plaza to Haight Street via a fairly level route.
The parade ends at Haight and Stanyan Streets.

“It will take about an hour to reach Stanyan Street. Those who wish to remain for awhile on Haight Street will then disperse along the sidewalks and stay for as long as they wish,  chatting with friendly visitors, and posing for pictures.”

Poor St. Valentine, a martyr. This is what the Left have made of his feast day.

See also “Archeologists find evidence of the obliteration of Sodom-Gomorrah

~Eowyn

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82-year-old bisexual trolls Tinder for sex

Tinder is a mobile app that facilitates communication between mutually interested users, allowing matched users to chat. The app is most commonly used as a dating app or for hookups — casual sex without relationships. That, in turn, has led to an uptick of sexually transmitted diseases (STD) from use of Tinder and similar apps.

See DCG’s post of January 23, 2016, “Tinder adds health section after AIDS charity put up billboards linking dating app to chlamydia and gonorrhea“.

Yesterday was Valentine’s Day, which is named after Saint Valentine — a priest who, in the second half of the 3rd century, was arrested and killed by the Roman Emperor Claudius for secretly marrying Christian couples during a time of persecution in the Church. Legend has it that while he was imprisoned and waiting for his martyrdom, he sent letters to his fellow Christians signing them, “From Your Valentine.” (See “St. Valentine“ and “Valentine’s Day and the meaning of true love“)
New York Post chose to celebrate Valentine’s Day with a revolting article on an 82-year-old New York woman who calls herself an actress/singer/songwriter named D’yan Forest (almost certainly a stage name), and uses Tinder to look for casual sex with men and women.
dyan-forest
Alexandra Klausner reports for New York Post, Feb. 14, 2017, that the 82-year-old singer-songwriter from New York City “is looking for a good time.”
D’yan Forest says that while many of her friends have given up on sex, she’ll never stop craving “intimacy”. She told The Post with a chuckle, “It ain’t over ’til the fat lady’s dead”.
The octogenarian, who identifies as bisexual, sings about checking out the boys and girls on Tinder with song lyrics like, “I like a schlong that’s hard, or a snatch that’s ginger.”
She says her desire to date is greater than ever: “My friends who sit home with their old husbands or whatever, and watch television, they don’t want sex anymore. And I think it’s because they’re bored to death! The older men my age don’t really interest me. They don’t think a woman is equal.” It’s younger men who excite her but the sex-crazed octogenarian laments she’s too old to attract them: “It’s rough and I would love to have sex. I’m not giving up hope. I’m just as vibrant emotionally, intellectually, sexually as I was in my 20s and 30s.”
Forest says she plans to go to meetups so that she can meet new people who share her interests, “I sometimes go out in the evenings, to a bar or a local place, where you sit around and talk.”
Forest was married soon after graduating from Middlebury College, where she was the only Jewish student, and stayed with her husband for four years. She told Lilith: “I was a stupid virgin when I met him. If I had fooled around before marriage, I would have known not to marry him.”
dyan-forest2
~Eowyn

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Valentine's Day and the meaning of true love

Today is Valentine’s Day — the day when TV commercials nag men to buy roses, candy, and jewelry for their wives or girl friends.
But did you know that the day is named after a real person, St. Valentine?
At least three different Saint Valentines, all of them martyrs, are mentioned in the early martyrologies under the date of February 14th. But the man for whom Valentine’s Day is named most likely was a priest at Rome who, in the second half of the 3rd century, was arrested and killed by the Emperor Claudius for secretly marrying Christian couples during a time of persecution in the Church. Legend has it that while he was imprisoned and waiting for his martyrdom, he sent letters to his fellow Christians signing them, “From Your Valentine.” (See joandarc’s post, “St. Valentine“)
The popular customs associated with Valentine’s Day probably came from a conventional belief in England and France during the Middle Ages, that on 14 February, i.e. half way through the second month of the year, the birds began to pair. Thus in Chaucer’s Parliament of Foules we read:

For this was sent on Seynt Valentyne’s day
Whan every foul cometh ther to choose his mate.

For this reason the day was looked upon as specially consecrated to lovers and as a proper occasion for writing love letters and sending lovers’ tokens. [Source: Catholic Encyclopedia]
So what is love?
I can find no better definition and description of true love than the words of St. Paul:

1 Corinthians 13:4-7

Love is patient, love is kind.
It is not jealous, it is not pompous,
It is not inflated, it is not rude,
it does not seek its own interests,
it is not quick-tempered,
it does not brood over injury,

it does not rejoice over wrongdoing
but rejoices with the truth.
It bears all things, believes all things,
hopes all things, endures all things.

And here’s the true meaning of Valentine’s Day:
God's Valentine to us John 3-16
The Greatest Commandment of all is to love God with your whole heart, your whole mind, your whole soul, and with all your strength; and to love your neighbor as you love yourself.
May the love of our Lord Jesus Christ be with you today!
~Eowyn

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St. Valentine

St Valentine
Did you know that there is indeed a history to the celebration of Valentine’s Day?  From the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops website (usccb.org):

“Today is the feast day of St. Valentine.  Did you know St. Valentine was a real person?  Well, actually there are at least 2 St. Valentines in the ancient martyrology of the Church.  While very little is known about Valentine of Rome and Valentine of Terni, we do know that Pope Gelasius declared February 14th his feast day in 496.  He is the patron saint of happy marriages, engaged couples and young people….
It is believed that Valentine was a priest arrested by the Emperor Claudius for marrying Christian couples secretly during a time of persecution in the Church.  Legend has it that while he was imprisoned and waiting for his martyrdom, he sent letters to his fellow Christians signing them, “From Your Valentine.”

Matthew Bunson, an apologist at EWTN (Eternal Word Television Network), tells us that not only was St. Valentine a Roman priest and martyr, executed on February 14th, but that he was also a physician, that he was probably flogged and/or beheaded and that he was buried on the Via Flaminia, with a basilica erected on the spot where he was buried in the year 350.  However, there is mention of another Valentine who was the bishop of Terni near Riome, although these two Valentines may be the same individual.
Going back to the tradition of sending missives, the Catholic Encyclopedia provides us with a history of this practice:

“The popular customs associated with Saint Valentine’s Day undoubtedly had their origin in a conventional belief generally received in England and France during the Middle Ages, that on 14 February, i.e. half way through the second month of the year, the birds began to pair.  Thus, in Chaucer’s Parliament of Foules we read: ‘For this was sent on Seynt Valentyne’s day whan every foul cometh ther to choose his mate.’  For this reason the day was looked upon as specially consecrated to lovers and as a proper occasion for writing love letters and sending lovers’ tokens.  Both the French and English literatures of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries contain allusions to the practice.”

We know for sure that St. Valentine was a martyr and that he gave his life for Jesus with great love and loyalty.  Could we be that brave as to give our lives for our Faith, for Jesus?  I have asked myself that question and I believe that because I am such a determined and stubborn individual, and because I love Jesus so much, that I would be able to do so, although I would need unending help from Him.  Accordingly, it is most appropriate to concentrate on the Gospel today from St. Luke 9:22-25:

Jesus said to His disciples:
“The Son of Man must suffer greatly and be rejected by the elders, the chief priests, and the scribes, and be killed and on the third day be raised.”
Then he said to all, “If anyone wishes to come after me, he must deny himself and take up his cross daily and follow me.  For whoever wishes to save his life will lose it, but whoever loses his life for my sake will save it.  What profit is there for one to gain the whole world yet lose or forfeit himself?”

Happy St. Valentine’s Day!
With love and respect,
Joan
Sources:
Usccb.org (United States Conference of Catholic Bishops); ewtn.com (Eternal Word Television Network)

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True Love

True Love

For God so loVed the world
       That He gAve
              His onLy
              BegottEn
                     SoN
                          That whosoever
        Believeth In Him
            Should Not perish
         But have Everlasting life.”
                                   ~John 3:16
H/t beloved fellow PatriotAngel
Who was Saint Valentine?
At least three different Saint Valentines, all of them martyrs, are mentioned in the early martyrologies under date of 14 February. One is described as a priest at Rome, another as bishop of Interamna (modern Terni), and these two seem both to have suffered in the second half of the third century and to have been buried on the Flaminian Way, but at different distances from the city. In William of Malmesbury’s time what was known to the ancients as the Flaminian Gate of Rome and is now the Porta del Popolo, was called the Gate of St. Valentine. The name seems to have been taken from a small church dedicated to the saint which was in the immediate neighborhood. Of both these St. Valentines some sort of Acta are preserved but they are of relatively late date and of no historical value. Of the third Saint Valentine, who suffered in Africa with a number of companions, nothing further is known.
Saint Valentine’s Day
The popular customs associated with Saint Valentine’s Day undoubtedly had their origin in a conventional belief generally received in England and France during the Middle Ages, that on 14 February, i.e. half way through the second month of the year, the birds began to pair. Thus in Chaucer’s Parliament of Foules we read:

For this was sent on Seynt Valentyne’s day
Whan every foul cometh ther to choose his mate.

For this reason the day was looked upon as specially consecrated to lovers and as a proper occasion for writing love letters and sending lovers’ tokens.
[Source: Catholic Encyclopedia]
~Eowyn

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