Tag Archives: Soldiers’ Angels

No sir, we are not “numb”

War-weary U.S. is numbed to drumbeat of troop deaths

KOMO News:  It was another week at war in Afghanistan, another string of American casualties, and another collective shrug by a nation weary of a faraway conflict whose hallmark is its grinding inconclusiveness.

After nearly 11 years, many by now have grown numb to the sting of losing soldiers like Pfc. Shane W. Cantu of Corunna, Mich. He died of shrapnel wounds in the remoteness of eastern Afghanistan, not far from the getaway route that Osama bin Laden took when U.S. forces invaded after Sept. 11, 2001, and began America’s longest war.

Nearly every day the Pentagon posts another formulaic death notice, each one brief and unadorned, revealing the barest of facts – name, age and military unit – but no words that might capture the meaning of the loss.

Cantu, who joined the Italy-based 173rd Airborne Brigade on Sept. 11 last year and went to Afghanistan last month, was among five U.S. deaths announced this past week.

American troops are still dying in Afghanistan at a pace that doesn’t often register beyond their hometowns. So far this year, it’s 31 a month on average, or one per day. National attention is drawn, briefly, to grim and arbitrary milestones such as the 1,000th and 2,000th war deaths. But days, weeks and months pass with little focus by the general public or its political leaders on the individuals behind the statistics.

Each week at war has a certain sameness for those not fighting it, yet every week brings distinct pain and sorrow to the families who learn that their son or daughter, brother or sister, father or mother was killed or wounded.

As the war drags on, it remains a faraway puzzle for many Americans. Max Boot, a military historian and defense analyst at the Council on Foreign Relations, has called Afghanistan the “Who Cares?” war. “Few, it seems, do, except for service personnel and their families,” he wrote recently. “It is almost as if the war isn’t happening at all.

The war remains at the forefront, naturally, for members of the military such as Marine Lt. Gen. John Kelly, whose son, 2nd Lt. Robert M. Kelly, was killed by a roadside bomb in southern Afghanistan in November 2010. “America as a whole today is certainly not at war, not as a country, not as a people,” Kelly said in a speech Aug. 28 at the American Legion’s national convention. Kelly is Defense Secretary Leon Panetta’s senior military assistant.

“Only a tiny fraction of American families fear all day and every day a knock at the door that will shatter their lives,” Kelly said.


I beg to differ with the author of this article.  We are not “numb” to our soldiers’ deaths.  We read about it everyday.

As Tom wrote, what we want is to withdraw our troops now, bring them home, and stop letting Obama stroke his ego as a wartime president with the blood of our troops.

We are not “numb” and we support our troops. For the past four years I have been serving Soldiers’ Angels, sending letters and care packages to my “adopted” soldiers.  If you would like to support our troops, visit Soldiers’ Angels or anysoldier.com.

DCG

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Remember our troops at Christmas

[youtube=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UE-H0xPKcUU&feature=youtu.be]
Christmas is just around the corner and the men and women serving abroad are always in our prayers.  Christmas is especially hard for them, being away from their loved ones in a war zone.
As I’ve mentioned before, I participate with Soldier’s Angels and have one adopted soldier serving abroad (my other adopted soldier recently returned back to the states – yay!).  
Each year Soldier’s Angels has the Operation Patriot Care Package drive.  With the generous support of more than 300,000 volunteers and donors worldwide, each Christmas Soldiers’ Angels is able to send more than 100,000 care packages to American troops in Iraq and Afghanistan.
The story covering this year’s care package effort will air on the Sean Hannity Show on December 23, 2011 and will include family members of deployed soldiers stuffing care packages with gifts from Soldiers’ Angels, as well as the reaction of the soldiers themselves in Afghanistan.
Please consider helping to send a care package to a soldier.  You can do so through Soldiers’ Angels or anysoldier.com.  Let them know how much you appreciate their sacrifice and service and bring a smile to their face on Christmas Day!
DCG

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Support our troops

May no soldier go unloved


As the tenth anniversary of 9/11 arrives tomorrow, there will be many remembrances and tributes.  911day.org has this message on their website:
“Please join the 9/11 Tribute Movement by briefly describing what you will do this year, a good deed, charitable activity, or other plans, to honor the 9/11 victims, survivors and those that rose in service in response to the attacks.”
As I will reflect on 9/11 tomorrow, I choose to support our soldiers that were inspired to serve, especially if they chose to do so after 9/11.  For the past three years, I have participated with Soldiers’ Angels.  I have “adopted” soldiers that I send letters to once a week and a care package to them once a month.  You are committed to do this for them for the length of their deployment, typically just a year.  What I like best about this is that you don’t send money to an organization, not knowing how it is being spent.  You spend your money on stamps and items for care packages, knowing that they are being sent directly to the soldier.

I recently received an email from one of my adopted soldiers. He stated, “First of all, let me thank you for letters and care packages. It means a lot to us that we have the support of the American people regardless of their political views. Second, let me apologize for the delay in getting back to you. It’s been a busy few weeks and I just recently got back from R&R leave as well. Imagine my surprise to find letters and boxes waiting for me on my return! Once again, thanks for your support!” (This photo is NOT my adopted soldier as I cannot reveal his identity.  This is a random photo from the internet.)
If you can’t commit to support a soldier for a year, you can sign up for a one time (or more) commitment to a soldier at AnySoldier.com.  You can choose a soldier from any branch, where the unit is from, or what country they are in now.  This site allows the soldiers to post notes, give you updates, and they can request specific items.  I’ve heard back from several soldiers I sent packages to:
“We would like to take this opportunity to thank you for your generous contributions to our office.  Your kindness is a reminder of the wonderful support, faith, and hope of patriotic Americans.  Thank you and God Bless!”
“My guys and I greatly appreciate everything you sent us.  It sure did raise everybody’s morale, and morale is what we all need right now.  Trust me we use everything you sent us.  Thanks again for the package and the support.”
While we remember the victims of 9/11, please also remember those that continue to fight for us.
DCG

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Support Our Soldiers!

May no soldier go unloved!

We here at the Fellowship fully support our men and women that serve to protect us! I have participated with Soldiers’ Angels for several years and highly recommend the organization.  You adopt a soldier,  send him/her a letter each week, and one care package each month. I prefer this as you deal directly with the soldier.
There is now a petition on-line to support the “Day of the Deployed” where you can sign up to “reaffirm patriotism and allegiance to our flag and country, and to honor our brave men and women in uniform who are selflessly putting their lives on the line to protect and preserve our way of life.” Go here to sign the petition.
The day to celebrate (as we should every day) is October 26. From the Soldiers’ Angels website:
 A day to honor the many selfless actions demanded of military members and their loved ones across the globe serves as a tangible reminder of the sacrifice being made in homes across America every day.  Every deployment reflects the deep commitment of not only the deploying member, but of the many friends and loved ones who are left behind to aid in answering our nations call.  Selfless men, women and children who are called upon to set aside their personal comfort and convenience to support the heroes they call mom, dad, father, mother, brother, sister or friend. 
[youtube=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eU1wuP34rn4]
God Bless our military and the families that support them. Prayers that the Angels keep them safe!
DCG

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