Tag Archives: Snohomish County

A novel concept: Washington state city trying to help homeless by enforcing the law

Marysville Mayor Jon Nehring

As I have mentioned here before: Many west coast, progressive-run cities have a homeless crisis that is exasperated by the fact that the bureaucrats do not enforce laws related to loitering, trespassing, public defecation, drug use and prostitution. This includes Seattle, Portland, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Sacramento, etc. See the following:

Marysville, just north of Seattle in Snohomish County, is pro-actively doing something to address their homeless. Their method? Accept help or go to jail.

The mayor of Marysville, Jon Nehring, was appointed in 2010 and then was elected to a full term in November 2011, and re-elected in November 2015 after running unopposed.

Mayor Nehring appeared on the Jason Rantz show and spoke about their approach to dealing with the homeless. He spoke about the results of the Embedded Social Worker program, calling it a “partnership approach that balances compassion with enforcement to make real differences.”

He tweeted the following statistic (which occurred in just six months) on December 5:

“Marysville’s law enforcement-embedded social worker program is seeing great early success!

  • Substance abuse assessments completed: 111
  • Treatment provided: 43
  • Detox completed: 40
  • Graduates of long-term treatment: 19
  • Housing secured: 37”

According to the January 2018 Point-in-Time January Count Summary for Snohomish County (where Marysville is located) there are 858 homeless people in Snohomish County.

Marysville, using the law and their social outreach program, has already assisted over 25% of those 858 people. That number exceeded both the mayor and the police chief’s expectations. Imagine that!

Also, the crime rate is down over 20% in Marysville.

Excerpts from the mayor’s interview via MyNorthwest.com:

“Help means an initial assessment, and then a drug detox, or a substance abuse detox,” Marysville Mayor Jon Nehring told KTTH’s Jason Rantz. “After that, a 30 to 60 day long term rehabilitation program. And then if they graduate from that, they move into transitional housing and job training, hopefully ultimately get a job, and be at least somewhat — if not fully — self-sufficient.

That approach stems from a zero-tolerance policy from Marysville police, enforced across the city.

“In Marysville, we don’t tolerate sleeping under bridges [or] illegal camping, [and] we discourage our citizens from giving to panhandlers — we encourage them to give to local charities instead,” Mayor Nehring said.

That way, rather than simply clearing homeless encampments only to see them pop up somewhere else, a concerted effort is being expended to get to the root of the issue. Take away the option to continue trespassing and committing crimes, argued Mayor Nehring, and you leave people with a simple choice.

“It’s a two-pronged approach,” he described. “You can take that option, which we would much prefer. If not, if you’re committing crimes, we’re going to take you to jail.

This method is really so simple that one has to wonder why other progressive-run cities can’t implement the same strategy: enforce the law with a zero-tolerance policy and apply taxpayer dollars to treatment programs.

Yet we know that method would not allow for bureaucrats to continually demand more taxpayer dollars to “solve” their homeless crisis.

Listen to the whole interview here.

DCG

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Liberal utopia of the Pacific Northwest: Cops never show up to armed robbery, assault in Snohomish County

And yet the proggies in that area continue to try and strip citizens of their Second Amendment right. I am so glad I moved away from that area.

From MyNorthwest.com: (Correction to story below) The Everett Police Department reports this crime did not happen within its jurisdiction. The original story has been updated.

The field manager of a Puget Sound business is puzzled why it took police so long to show up for a violent crime last week.

Dave Igel is the field manager for Morris-Hansen Enterprises Everett, a company that cleans windows up and down the I-5 corridor.

Last Wednesday, Morris-Hansen employees were cleaning windows at a bank in Everett when Igel said they noticed two thieves stealing from their work van. Upon approach by an employee, Igel said one of the thieves drew a gun, stating, “This is my van,” while the other sucker-punched the employee.

“By then, the other guy had come around the van and drew the gun, and told him to give him his wallet,” Igel described. “And he wouldn’t, so [the thief] struck him a few times with the pistol. He finally gave [the wallet] up.”

The bank reported an armed robbery and assault, but police did not show up, according to Igel. After an hour-and-a-half of waiting, the victims finally went to the Snohomish County Sheriff’s Office to report the crime.

“The guy told them, ‘These guys are being assaulted by guns in our parking lot,’ and nobody showed up,” Igel said.

Igel cannot understand why Everett police did not at least “check for fingerprints or check for video footage.” (Editor’s note: The crime did not happen in EPD jurisdiction.)

He said that he is a firm supporter of police officers and does not blame individual cops. However, he does blame local leadership for “not letting the police actually do their job” so that cops are “walking around with their hands tied.”

The violent experience was so harrowing for the employee whose wallet was stolen, that in the 10 days since the crime, he quit his job and moved back home to Texas.

“He freaked out because they took his wallet, and he was afraid they were going to come to his house,” Igel said. “He just freaked out and quit, and packed everything, and moved back to Texas.”

For that man, Igel said, the armed theft was the last strike after witnessing crimes all over the Puget Sound while on the job.

“He said he’s just seen enough around here — he said he’s been approached by so many different vagrants on the street … Texas isn’t like this, they don’t have it like this, where you have vagrant people all over the place,” Igel said.

Igel said he has witnessed countless crimes in his travels throughout the region for work, in particular downtown Seattle.

I love my job, but if everything is going to drive me away from this state, it’s going to be this city [of Seattle],” Igel said. “It’s insane trying to live around here.”

He holds out hope that new leadership will be elected to better handle the region’s drug and property crime crisis — especially when seven Seattle City Council members are on the ballot next year. “I hope the people that are up for re-election do not get re-elected because something has got to change around here,” he said.

See also:

DCG

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Convicted robber files $6.3M claim against Snohomish County

If this doesn’t get thrown out of court, I will be dumbfounded.

Professional criminal Kirkpatrick

Professional criminal Kirkpatrick


Everett Herald: Todd Kirkpatrick robbed banks. Until he got caught.
Interrupted mid-robbery, he ran from a Snohomish County sheriff’s deputy. In his attempt to escape, Kirkpatrick leveled his gun at the deputy, who shot him twice.
Now Kirkpatrick, an inmate at Clallam Bay Corrections Center, wants Snohomish County to pay him $6.3 million for his troubles. Kirkpatrick, 57, recently filed a legal claim against Snohomish County, a precursor to a lawsuit. The claim was obtained by the newspaper under state public records laws.
He wrote that his medical bills from the gunshot wounds amounted to more than $300,000, and that other police officers failed to stop Deputy Dan Scott “from trying to execute me.”
are you serious
Kirkpatrick was robbing a KeyBank in Stanwood on Sept. 25, 2012, when he spotted Scott on patrol outside and tried to run. The deputy chased Kirkpatrick across the street into the Haggen parking lot.
Scott reported that Kirkpatrick leveled a gun at him before the deputy opened fire. Kirkpatrick’s gun was recovered. It wasn’t loaded.
Before his arrest, Kirkpatrick was the subject of police bulletins throughout Western Washington, dubbed the “Phony Pony Bandit” because of a wig he wore during his heists. He was convicted of four bank robberies and sentenced to 17 years. He got a longer sentence because he used a firearm in his holdups.
In his claim, Kirkpatrick wrote, “I was obviously unarmed and severely shot up.” He also suffered long-term loss of mobility to his left arm, left hand and left leg, he wrote.
Kirkpatrick, who is from Anacortes, had been a businessman and developer before the economic collapse hit the housing market, according to public records. He had significant debts and, according to his attorney, struggled with alcoholism. The paperwork he filed does not detail how he arrived at the total of more than $6 million.
Not long after the shooting, Scott was named the 2012 Law Enforcement Officer of the Year by the Washington Council of Police and Sheriffs. He also got a Distinguished Service Medal from the sheriff’s office that year.
DCG

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Foul Stench in Snohomish County Attributed to Al Gore

Gosh, that’s a great title for a post!  And, in this case, it’s probably true.  Snohomish County, WA is a proud member of ICLEI and embraces all the Al Gore-ish aspects of Agenda 21 including “sustainable farming”.  Come visit us and see for yourself;  but, bring a nose plug or a gas mask!  LOL!   ~LTG

Is Al Gore to Blame for Snohomish Stench?

The mystery has been solved! That overpowering stench that has hung over Snohomish, Wash., for the last few days, offending residents and beguiling investigators as to its origins, has been identifiedas, of all things, chicken manure.

I blame Al Gore.

That’s because chicken manure can be one of the most earth-friendly soil-fertilization substances around. Al Gore knows this. Hell, he may have “invented” it.

Full story here

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Agenda 21: Destroying Farm Land in Western Washington State

John Koster , a longtime conservative, who currently serves as county councilman in Snohomish County, WA ( located on the I-5 corridor just north of Seattle), announced he’s running for U.S. Congress in 2012 against liberal incumbent, Rick Larsen.   Following is his excellent article explaining the threat to farmland planned by the local  ICLEI “Sustainable Development” nutjobs.  (FYI, I met John in the early 1990s.  As I recall, he was a dairy farmer before he entered the political arena.)
In my opinion, with concern for the rising price of food and the “eat locally” mantra of Michelle and her food nazis, this Agenda 21 totalitarianism should even make liberals hopping mad!  ~LTG

Significant concerns with the Sustainable Lands Strategy

By John Koster, Snohomish County Councilman
My purpose in writing this short article is to bring attention to some critically important land use changes under consideration for Snohomish County. These plans, should they succeed, will permanently alter the character of the County. At stake are thousands of acres of designated farmland coveted by environmental interests seeking ways to “enhance” salmon and wildlife habitat.
While the authors and proponents of the Sustainable Lands Strategy
(SLS) have presented these major policy changes as a “win-win” situation, others are not so sure — and remain deeply concerned with a strategy that seeks to create “fish habitat” by destroying thousands of acres of farmland, much of it by means of salt and/or fresh water inundation.
Normally, such a change would require a de-designation process that involves a justification for such de-designation, public hearings, and thoughtful decisions made by the County’s elected officials. Instead, the SLS is a short-cut that avoids such procedures and, more importantly, takes the decision-making process away from the County Council to vest the authority within a newly created bureaucracy.
The farmlands targeted for conversion to habitat would become designated as “critical areas,” and such designation is not without impact. Significant setbacks and other restrictions are likely to result. What is being sold as a worthy conservation program could morph into a much larger land control mechanism, involving restrictions on land use with accompanying penalties for property owners guilty of insufficiently “sustainable” activities. Continue reading

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