Tag Archives: smartphones

Student develops wearable technology aimed to prevent sexual assault

bracelet vs conceal carry

From Daily Mail: A University of Alabama master’s student has developed an unusual tool to combat sexual assault: a bracelet.

The device monitors wearers’ vital signs and can pick up on changes that would signal being under attack. The smart bracelet, still in the prototype stage, alerts a predetermined list of contacts and the police if it senses that the wearer is being harmed.

Additionally, it emits a loud alarm and is equipped with red strobe lights meant to scare away the attacker or get the attention of others in the vicinity.

The team behind the bracelet, Associate Professor Dr. Ragib Hasan and master’s student Jayun Patel, are hopeful that the device can prevent sexual assaults, which are extremely common on college campuses such as theirs.

Dr. Hasan explained in a statement that the ability to call the authorities is usually unavailable to assault victims under attack.

He said: ‘A major challenge to assault prevention is that, during an assault, victims often to not have an easily accessible way to call for help. Whether calling 911 or using an emergency alert app or device, each of these tools requires users to press a button in order to call for help. That is often not possible while a violent act is taking place or if a person is unconscious as a result of the assault.

Dr. Hasan directed Patel while she designed the new product, which relies on machine learning and sensors to detect signs of assault.

The bracelet houses an Adafruit Circuit Playground, pressure sensors, GPS capabilities and microphones, among other tools. It can also determine whether a wearer is standing or lying down.

If the device recognizes that a wearer is in danger it connects to their smartphone via Bluetooth and immediately messages emergency personnel and sends them the wearer’s location. Additionally, it alerts friends the wearer has designated by way of an app.

Patel said: ‘The sensors allow the bracelet to collect user activity and vital signs continuously. A machine learning algorithm detects and differentiates the user’s regular movement and unexpected and sudden movements that can be indicative of an assault.’

The bracelet was designed with the intention of creating a device that can detect assault, but it can be applied to other emergency situations.

For example, the engineers said it could potentially be used to alert the authorities if an elderly person falls or to provide a warning if someone with a disability performs a risky movement.

Patel said she wants to expand the technology and create other ‘smart’ items, such as shoes and earrings, that work to keep people safe.

The wearable devices designed in Dr. Hasan’s lab are low-cost; the prototype for the bracelet costs less than $40.00. The researchers are hopeful the price will drop even more if the product is eventually mass produced.

The technology could benefit a large portion of the population: one-third of women and one-sixth of men in the US alone experience sexual violence.

DCG

More than a quarter of millennials say they would replace a human lover with a DROID

Dolly sex doll

From Daily Mail: A new report suggests that over a quarter of 18-34 year-olds will feel it’s normal to form friendships and even romantic relationships with robots in the future. The report was created by Paris-based Havas, and examined the future of artificial intelligence, and people’s attitudes to the future of technology. The findings were based on a survey of 12,000 people of mixed ages worldwide.

It found that in the UK, men were three times as likely to agree they could have a relationship with a robot in the future, compared to women. And romantic relationships with bots will more common that you might think, with the report suggesting they could be taken up by as much as 27 per cent of 18-34 year olds.

Aside from robot-relationships, the report had several other predictions for the future.

The data suggests that men in the UK, men are also more likely than women to prefer their social media lives to their real ones, with nearly 20 per cent preferring the virtual world of social media.

Despite this growing connection to the online world for some, there was widespread consensus (70 per cent of respondents) that smartphones are weakening human bonds.

Yet it is younger people who are feeling the worst effects of this.

According to the study, younger people are more likely to feel depressed about their own lives after looking at other people’s social media channels, with 42 per cent of 18-34 year olds reporting feeling depressed or unhappy after seeing other people’s lives online.

Nigel Hughes, board director at Havas PR, said: ‘Filters and AR can, on the face of it, help improve people’s perceptions of the world around them, yet our study reveals that nearly half (42 per cent) of 18-34 years olds felt unhappy about their own lives after comparing themselves to others on social media.

‘That’s compared to only 21 per cent of 35-54 year olds saying the same, suggesting we are not equipping young people with the emotional framework needed to process this virtual reality.’

Another area of tension is the fact that 40 per cent of people aged between 18 and 34 are concerned that robots will take their jobs. People aged 55 and over, meanwhile, were most likely to think AI will liberate humans from repetitive tasks, giving us more time to enjoy life.

DCG

Wendy’s plans self-ordering kiosks at 1,000 locations

15-an-hour

Via Business Insider: Wendy’s says it plans to install self-ordering kiosks at about 1,000 locations by the end of the year.  A typical location would have three kiosks, The Columbus Dispatch reported. Higher-volume restaurants will be given priority for the kiosks.

Wendy’s chief information officer, David Trimm, said the kiosks are intended to appeal to younger customers and reduce labor costs. Kiosks also allow customers of the fast food giant to circumvent long lines during peak dining hours while increasing kitchen production.  Trim estimates the company will see a return on its investment in less than two years.

They are looking to improve their automation and their labor costs, and this is a good way to do it,” said Darren Tristano, vice president with Technomic, a food-service research and consulting firm. “They are also trying to enhance the customer experience. Younger customers prefer to use a kiosk.

Kiosks are also valued by the Dublin, Ohio-based company for their ability to provide data about customers.  “This move puts them at the forefront of the kiosk and tech movement,” Tristano said.  Kiosks already have been installed at several central Ohio locations, where the company first tested the technology.

Customers will still be able to order at the counter for now, although Tristano predicts that mobile ordering and payment via smartphones will one day overtake self-ordering kiosks and cash registers.

DCG

Smartphones Are Debasing Society

image

The following appeared on Henry Makow’s excellent site:

http://henrymakow.com/2015/03/smartphones-have-debased-society.html

Thanks to smartphones, people are always
distracted. They are not interacting with people
or places in the moment. Baby boomers like
David Douthit have banished them from their lives.

by David Scott Douthit
(henrymakow.com)

Everywhere, people seem to be glued to their smartphones. I was at one of my son’s baseball games. My ex-wife and my daughter were in the bleachers behind home plate. Neither one saw any of the game, as they were both busy texting the entire game. My son hit his first home run. After the game he asked his Mom if she saw it. She answered, “Saw what?”

I tried the smartphone thing around ten years ago. The problem was people kept calling me up. They would call when I was walking the dog. They would call when I was taking a nap. They would call and expect me to call them back immediately, and get mad when I didn’t. The smart phone was much more an inconvenience, than convenience. I threw it away, and have not had one since.

My wife and I had to put a sign on our front door that reads “Turn that bleeping smartphonr off!” because her kids kept coming over to make phone calls, or at least that is the way it seemed. It was aggravating when a visitor comes over and just had to “take this call” or that call after call. Or, they would be sitting on the couch looking at the smart phone and texting. You get schizophrenic trying to converse with someone who is some place else mentally all the time.

HEALTH DANGERS

Then there is the matter of electromagnetic radiation waves emitted from the smart phone into the users brain.

There is ample evidence smartphones cause brain tumors, as well as a host of other maladies. I make it a point to tell all my family and friends about that risk. It is usually dismissed with a, “So what? Everybody dies sometime.”

Although my son has a smartphone, I do not allow him to put it up next to his brain, or carry it in his pocket next to his testicles. Organ tissue is much more sensitive than muscle or bone. My boy is only seventeen, but I would like him to use his brain, and father some grand kids someday.

This generation will be stunted. They have conceded their cognitive ability to computers and cell phones. It appears this has enabled them to argue and bicker with people non-stop. The smartphone is a extension of their sour attitude. Grammar and good manners are gone.

This generation has no morals. The breakdown of morality has a lot to do with rise of technology. You would think technology would not have affect morality, but it has enabled the wolves among us to be more wolf-like. Guys brag about bedding hundreds of women. They attribute the ability to meet more women to modern technology.

Most modern men have absolutely no standards. The only standard they have is their ability to use other people. The exact inverse of the Golden Rule.

I also try to stay off the computer. I have to admit, it is addictive. The pixels excite the brain in a drug-like fashion. I have spent too much time on the computer in the past. It didn’t make me any happier or wiser.

Knowledge and wisdom are two different things. Knowledge is accumulated information. Wisdom is the ability to know the right way to use it. Wisdom is gained by negotiating difficult situations, crises, real life moral dilemmas. Time spent on the computer is not real life experience. I think I will go for a walk and exercise some wisdom and my legs.


Also by David Douthit- MD Pill Pushers-A Personal Story
————————— The AIDS Hoax
Also by David Douthit- The AIDS Hoax——————— Gulf War Troops Got vaccine Containing Nerve Gas

Makow comment- And David doesn’t even get into the surveillance aspects.

First Comment from Dan:

I’ve lived with dial phone ‘land lines’, sending letters by postman, and writing checks. “New” isn’t always better; it’s a always a trade-off. Switching from land line telephone to ‘smartphone’ exchanges one set of inconveniences for another, more complicated set.

At the moment people remain concerned mainly about the loss of privacy [1] that goes with storing every byte of information about you on these GPS tracking, hand held chipset.

But you’ll get over that. Now that they’ve got you hooked on ‘convenience’ , heavily invested into it (iPhones ain’t cheap), and visually dependent upon digitally processed images do recognize what you’re seeing on that little screen as ‘real’, privacy will become less important. – See more at: http://henrymakow.com/2015/03/smartphones-have-debased-society.html#sthash.S4TX7ugM.dpuf