Tag Archives: Seattle’s homelessness crisis

Seattle to open a new homeless shelter where drugs and alcohol are allowed

ed murray

I’ve written about the major homelessness problem that Seattle, and its homosexual mayor Ed Murray, have tried to address. The good mayor has tried to address this by:

Their latest solution to help homeless people change their circumstances? Open a $2.7 million dollar facility where one is permitted to use alcohol and drugs. I wouldn’t bet that inviting these abuses will be a successful path for homeless people.

From Seattle Times: After a siting controversy and months of delay, Seattle’s first enhanced 24-hour shelter for homeless people will open to clients Wednesday.

Inside the newly refurbished facility in the Little Saigon neighborhood are sleeping cots with blue cushions that couples can push together, offices where clients will receive supportive services, and a mess hall for meals.

Staffers at the Navigation Center will spend the next days making last-minute preparations for the opening, said Greg Jensen, a spokesman for the Downtown Emergency Service Center (DESC), which the city has contracted to operate the facility.

About 20 homeless people already have been referred to the center by city outreach workers, Jensen said. “We anticipate that we’ll be seeing clients almost immediately,” he said.

Mayor Ed Murray put the process to develop the center in motion via a June 2016 executive order, saying that creating a shelter with services beyond those offered at traditional facilities was key to the city’s strategy.

But its development was rough going. A plan to open the center by the end of 2016 was scuttled when the city was unable to find a suitable site.

In February, city officials reached an agreement with the Seattle Indian Commission to lease the Pearl Warren building. The move displaced Operation Nightwatch, a mats-on-the-floor-style emergency shelter for homeless men that was leasing space in the building, and stirred up protest among residents of the surrounding community.

Advocates with neighborhood group Friends of Little Saigon continue to push back against the city, saying that the decision to site the center on the edge of the city’s Chinatown International District was reached without hearing views from local residents.

“There are many in the community who still don’t want it, but we know it’s going to open anyway,” said Quynh Pham, spokeswoman for Friends of Little Saigon. “At this point, we just want to have the city address concerns about this model and how the center will be run.”

City officials are betting that the center, with restrictions on entry eased and intensive services available, will become an asset for moving people indoors and out of conditions that are unsanitary and sometimes unsafe. People living in unauthorized tent encampments will initially be given top priority, officials said.

”It will allow us to reach those who are in the community of homeless people who have not been getting robust services,” said DESC director Dan Malone.

Modeled after a similar shelter in San Francisco’s Mission District, the center features laundry and storage facilities, showers and enough dormitory space to provide beds to about 75 people.

Unlike more restrictive shelters, clients will be able to store their belongings, bring along their pets and partners, and come and go when they like. While discouraged, drug and alcohol use inside the facility will be allowed unless it disturbs other clients or the surrounding community.

Once there, people who might have been unwilling or unable to take advantage of other shelter options will be pointed toward mental-health, addiction and housing services based on their needs, officials said.

How successful the center might be in moving people into permanent housing remains an open question. Similar shelters in San Francisco, which is experiencing its own crisis over affordable housing and visible homelessness, may serve as a rough guide.

Read the rest of the article here.

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City jobs grow out of Seattle homelessness crisis

government solve all problems

In April 2016, I told you how the embattled Seattle Mayor Ed Murray decided to tackle the severe homelessness crisis in Seattle. He hired a “homelessness czar” to “lead and align efforts across City departments, provide oversight and evaluation of data and outcomes, provide strategic guidance on developing policy and protocols, and lead external engagement and communication strategies.”

And, as many could have predicted, the homelessness czar (and the high salary) is not enough to solve the problem. What to do? Hire more people!

From MyNorthwest.com: Two new jobs have been created to tackle the Seattle homelessness crisis. This adds to other positions directly related to homelessness the city created within the last year.

The new positions bring the total number of new homeless-related jobs to six that the city has hired for since August. The two positions currently advertised for will potentially pay more than $100,000 each.

    • Homelessness czar: $137,500 annually
    • Homeless encampment trash/litter program administrator: up to $46.80 / hour
    • Two homeless encampment field operations advisers (x2): up to $42 / hour
    • Executive for encampment response: Between $119,997.36 and $140,000.41 annually
    • Homeless communications director: Between $91,872 and $125,843.76 annually

Adding all that up – at the high end of estimated annual pay – it comes to $537,908.17 in new salaries.

Before Seattle and King County declared a state of emergency over the homeless crisis in 2015, the city spent about $40 million on the issue; the county spent $36 million. After the state of emergency was declared, Seattle put up $5 million more, and the county threw in $2 million more.

Job descriptions

“Executive overseeing the homeless encampment response program” pays between $119,997.36 and $140,000.41. The role of the executive will be to lead cleanup programs for homeless encampments on public property while finding housing for people living in those camps. The purpose will be to move people living in tents into “indoor housing alternatives.”

Communications director will be dedicated solely to the homeless response program. This position pays between $91,872 and $125,843.76 annually. They will handle all internal and external communications around encampment issues. They will work with everyone from the mayor to the council, the police department and more to create messaging around homelessness.

And let’s not forget, in August 2016, the city hired George Scarola to be Seattle’s homelessness czar. Scarola is charged with leading the city’s homeless response efforts, organizing multiple departments and providing oversight and strategic guidance.

Seattle began hiring again in March 2017, this time to solve the homelessness issue. One position was for an administrator for a homeless encampment trash/litter cleanup program. The position is paid up to $46.80 an hour and was listed as temporary. The city also advertised to hire two field positions that would coordinate cleanup of encampments. They are paid up to $42 an hour.

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Seattle to set aside money for undocumented students

The liberal City of Seattle has a major problem with homelessness. Mayor Ed Murray declared a State of Emergency on November 2, 2015.  To address the homelessness problem, the city set up safe RV lots for families and individuals living in vehicles. The problem with that? The City didn’t calculate the high costs associated with the program.

"The Jungle" homeless camp in Seattle/AP Photo

“The Jungle” homeless camp in Seattle/AP Photo

The money and resources spent has done nothing to solve the problem.  In mid-November, the Department of Housing and Urban Development released a report that indicated that there was an increase of 7.3 percent more homeless people in Washington state this year than in 2015.

Given that track record, does anyone believe that the city of Seattle can efficiently and effectively address the needs of illegal aliens? And why is the city allocating money to illegal aliens when U.S. citizens are living on the streets? Because it’s progressive.

From Seattle Times: The city of Seattle is allotting $250,000 to address the needs of undocumented immigrant illegal alien students enrolled in Seattle Public Schools and their families.

Progressive Seattle Mayor Ed Murray

Progressive Seattle Mayor Ed Murray

The move is part of an executive order Mayor Ed Murray signed Thursday, reaffirming Seattle’s status as a “sanctuary city.”

An “inclusive and equitable city cabinet,” made up of representatives from various city departments, will come up with a plan for how to spend the money, according to a news release from the mayor’s office that did not offer further details on what such needs might be.

The order also directs city employees not to ask residents about their immigration status, unless police officers have a reasonable suspicion that the person is committing or has committed a felony. It also directs departments to serve all residents regardless of immigration status.

The order had been expected as Murray had earlier promised that Seattle would remain a sanctuary city with policies to protect undocumented immigrants, despite Donald Trump’s election as president. Trump has vowed to crack down on cities that shield residents from federal immigration authorities, pledging to block federal taxpayer dollars from going to them, though it’s not clear Seattle would necessarily be among them.

Mayors of other cities, including New York and Chicago, have joined Murray in limiting the extent to which their city departments will help federal immigration authorities.

Washington’s population of undocumented immigrants illegal aliens grew by 40,000 between 2009 and 2014, making the state just one of six nationwide to see an increase, according to the executive order signed by Murray.

government solve all problems

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The City of Seattle is hiring a “Homelessness Director”! Wait until you see the pay rate…

Mayor Ed Murray along one of Seattle's rainbow sidewalks - designed to fight crime!

Mayor Ed Murray along one of Seattle’s rainbow sidewalks – designed to fight crime!

The progressive City of Seattle has a major problem with homelessness. Mayor Ed Murray declared a State of Emergency on November 2, 2015. And the good mayor called for an end of “divisive rhetoric” on homelessness.

The city set up safe RV lots for for homeless families and individuals living in vehicles. The problem with that? The City didn’t calculate the high costs associated with the program.

One would think these liberals would take a look at the causes of the homelessness and how their progressive policies may affect them: rent rates, mental and drug issues, and salaries. Oh wait, the new $15 minimum wage will solve everything! Apparently not.

"The Jungle" homeless camp in Seattle/AP Photo

“The Jungle” homeless camp in Seattle/AP Photo

So the best way to address the homeless crisis? Hire another city employee!

Director of Homelessness

This director will lead and align efforts across City departments, provide oversight and evaluation of data and outcomes, provide strategic guidance on developing policy and protocols, and lead external engagement and communication strategies.

Across the region and in many cities around the nation, homelessness is on the rise. In 2016, the King County region saw an increase of 19% of our unsheltered population, the majority of those people residing in Seattle. In November of 2015, Mayor Murray declared a State of Emergency on Homelessness to bring light to this crisis and seek greater support from our state and federal partners. Mayor Murray has increased spending on homelessness intervention and prevention and the City of Seattle is now spending a record high of nearly $50 million dollars to address this crisis. In order to ensure that the City’s increased efforts are well coordinated and driving toward the greatest outcomes for those in need, the new Director of Homelessness will be tasked with executing the Mayor’s priorities on this issue.

Key Responsibilities:

  • Lead City’s response to homelessness with strong alignment and coordination across multiple departments.
  • Provide strategic guidance to the Mayor and senior executive staff on priorities, deliverables, and emergent issues related to homelessness.
  • Assess current City operations and develop and implement a plan of recommendations that will bring greater effectiveness and efficiency to efforts such as improved data and performance, governance structures, communication strategies, and operations.
  • Demonstrate a commitment to the Race and Social Justice Initiative and ensure the City’s response to homelessness is fair, just, and equitably implemented for all those in need in our community.

The Ideal Candidate:

  • Focus on racial equity in ways that enable effective working relationships in diverse communities and cross-cultural situations. Creates planning solutions for traditionally underserved communities.
  • Ability to inspire, persuade, engage, speak straight-forwardly about complex homeless issues, make tough decisions and take difficult actions. Display balanced thinking that combines analysis, wisdom, experience and perspective. Produce data-driven decisions that withstand the “test of time.”

Desirable Qualifications:

BA degree and at least five years experience in a senior leadership role within a large and complex publicly accountable organization. The preferred candidate will have experience successfully leading high-priority and highly visible projects. A master’s degree is preferred.

The pay rate for this job? Starts at $97,279.92 and can pay up to $160,483.68.

Apply here!

government solve all problems

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