Tag Archives: Seattle Seahawks

Raiders’ Marshawn Lynch sat during US anthem yet stood for Mexican anthem

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Marshawn Lynch enjoying a banana during the National Anthem/AP Photo

This from the guy who sported an “Everybody vs. Trump” t-shirt and during a pre-season game, sat on a cooler eating a banana during the National Anthem. ‘Nuff said.

From Q13Fox: Raiders running back Marshawn Lynch sat during most of U.S. anthem and stood for the Mexican anthem before their game against the Patriots at Azteca Stadium in Mexico City.

Lynch has not stood for the national anthem since returning from retirement this season.

There did not appear to be any other protests during the anthem as the afternoon games kicked off.

Former NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick pioneered the protests last year when he took a knee during the playing of the national anthem over what he said was social and racial injustice.

This year, several NFL players have joined the protest including Seattle Seahawks defensive end Michael Bennett.

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Seahawk player Bennett wants Kaepernick to get another “opportunity”

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Seahawks player Bennett (l) and his buddy the cop-hater Kaepernick.

Add to the growing list of demands from the whiney NFL players.

From Yahoo Sports: The NFL’s owners and players are in the midst of discussions about how to handle protests during the national anthem moving forward. But one prominent voice in the entire story believes talks are pointless without focusing on one key aspect: why Colin Kaepernick, who began the entire protest movement, remains unemployed.

“I think the first step to even being able to even have a conversation is making sure that Colin Kaepernick gets an opportunity to play in the NFL,” said the Seattle Seahawks’ Michael Bennett, per ESPN. “I think before we even negotiate anything about whether we sit, whether we stand, it should be a negotiation about opening up the doors for Colin Kaepernick and giving him an opportunity again, because I feel like through everything, that’s been lost. All of us are having an opportunity to be able to speak to our employers, but to think about the guy who started everything not to be able to have a voice at this moment, it just doesn’t seem very right to me.”

Players have contended that Kaepernick is at least as talented as the backups on NFL rosters. But there’s an argument to be made that Kaepernick, as a quarterback, isn’t worth the blowback his signing would draw from fans and anti-protest critics. The problem at hand is that teams aren’t conceding that point publicly, hiding behind either a dismissal of Kaepernick’s football skills or simple silence. That’s why Kaepernick has filed a grievance against the NFL, accusing the league’s owners of collusion.

Bennett also took issue with Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones’ decree that players who sit for the anthem wouldn’t play, and Bennett invoked some provocative imagery to get his point across.

“It reminded me of the Dred Scott case: You’re property, so you don’t have the ability to be a person first,” he said, referencing an 1857 Supreme Court decision involving a slave. “I think that in this generation, I think that sends the wrong message to young kids and young people all across the world that your employer doesn’t see you as a human being, they see you as a piece of property, and if that’s the case, then I don’t get it. I just don’t get why you don’t see us as human beings first.”

Bennett’s Seahawks are in New York this weekend to play the Giants. Yes, there are still football games happening.

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NFL to formally endorse criminal justice legislation, finance activism boot camp

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Doubling down on losing more fans.

Try to ignore the blatantly biased opinion of this CBS writer.

From CBS Sports: Protests around professional sports have been nothing if not polarizing, especially considering President Donald Trump’s persistent war of words with athletes who use the national anthem as a platform for activism, but player demonstrations may have fueled NFL support for legislative change at the federal level.

CBS Sports NFL Insider Jason La Canfora reported two weeks ago that Roger Goodell has maintained a steady dialogue since this summer with many civic-minded players whiners, including Malcolm Jenkins of the Eagles, Michael Bennett of the Seahawks and Anquan Boldin, who abruptly retired before the season. Goodell and the players have been working on ways that the NFL can assist them in their community endeavors, an effort that began well before the president made remarks critical of NFL players.

And, now, it appears those efforts have grown into formal league action.

ESPN’s Jim Trotter reported via Twitter Monday that “the NFL is going to formally endorse criminal justice legislation” that surfaced early in October and has garnered support from several players “lobbying for” reformed sentencing guidelines. NFL Network’s Judy Battista later confirmed via league spokesman Joe Lockhart that the NFL would do so.

The league’s endorsement of such legislation, which Politico said on Oct. 4 is “aimed at easing sentences for some non-violent offenders, such as for drug crimes, while beefing up other tough-on-crime laws,” represents a victory for peaceful-protest-driven activism, according to former NFL executive Joe Banner.

“[This] is a big win for players on the issues they brought up if they can get past [the] method of protest,” Banner tweeted Monday. “Seize the moment.”

This is likely only the beginning of formal league efforts spurned by Goodell’s talks with players in the effort to turn player protests into action. From La Canfora’s report from two weeks ago:

The NFL had been getting closer to finalizing and announcing some of those plans, sources said, prior to Donald Trump’s remarks calling protesting players “sons of b——,” and considerable effort in the aftermath has gone to working with players, owners and teams on their response to that diatribe. But the league remains hopeful of getting this initiative, informally referred to as “From Protest to Progress,” within the league office, off the ground shortly.

The league is seeking tangible ways to help players channel their concerns over social injustice, racism, police brutality and other societal ills into action at a grassroots level. No just offering financial support but working in tandem, physically, with players as they go out into their cities both in season and in the offseason. Bennett, Boldin and Jenkins all have strong convictions about the need for criminal justice reform, which is one area the league could possibly assist their cause. Those men met with politicians on Capitol Hill about such measures over the summer — and Goodell has been very receptive to their ideas as they and other players continue regular outreach into their home communities as well as others (Native American reservations, Haiti, etc).

Trotter said in an appearence on “Outside The Lines” that the NFL is also discussing the creation of a PSA campaign regarding social issues and the potential for owners to organize meetings between players and politicians. The league has also “agreed to finance a social activism boot camp at Morehouse College in February,” Trotter reported.

Some of the hundreds of NFL players who knelt, linked arms or stayed off the field during pregame anthems in September did so in rebuke of President Trump’s call for team owners to “fire” those who protested social injustice during the anthem. But others, including Jenkins, Chris Long and Boldin, have repeatedly demonstrated not to protest America or its flag but to spark discussions about police brutality and criminal justice reform, even facilitating meetings with NFL commissioner Roger Goodell and local law enforcement.

Now, it appears they have gotten the NFL’s support in getting some of that reform.

The proposed legislation, per Politico, has a substantial backing from both Democratic and Republican senators but “will still face opposition from Attorney General Jeff Sessions, who helped sink the bill when he served in the Senate.”

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Sunday Night Football ratings down, again

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Not flying with the fans…

Imagine my distress…

From Yahoo: On a day that ended in gunfire and tragedy at a country music festival in Las Vegas, Sunday also saw continuing controversy with NFL players kneeling before games, more standing, locking arms, and some sitting during the national anthem.

Several members of the Seattle Seahawks chose to sit before Sunday Night Football kicked off, while the Indianapolis Colts decided to link arms in a show of unity for equality and racial justice. The result saw the Colts crushed as the Seahawks overcame early struggles (the Colts led the game at halftime) and scored a blowout 46-18 win.

Whether it was politics or the final score or a mix of both, it was no victory for NBC and the NFL.

With a 11.0/19 in metered-market results, SNF was down 5% from last week when the Washington Redskins beat the Oakland Raiders 27-10. As the league took another week-by-week ratings hit just a month into the 2017-18 season, Sunday’s game also was down a bit year-to-year. Compared with the then-season-low of the Pittsburgh Steelers’ 43-14 smackdown of the Kansas City Chiefs in primetime on October 2, 2016, last night’s SNF dipped 2% in the early numbers.

On a night of competition on the other nets, that 2016 game ended up with a 6.7/22 rating among adults 18-49 and 18.06 million viewers. Against the debut of Star Trek: Discovery and more, last week’s 8:30-11:15 PM ET Redskins-Raiders battle saw a final numbers of 6.3/23 in the key demo and a total audience of 17.48 million.

Now, blowouts usually always pour cold water on NFL ratings, and all things considered, last night’s MM numbers held up OK. However, with the politics that have become such a watched player in their own right in the past few weeks, the league might be close to having reached a tipping point. Barely ahead of last year’s struggling season in the ratings, the big-money NFL now finds itself losing traction in the numbers and public perception.

Read the rest of the story here.

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Seattle Seahawks create fund for team’s “justice and equality” cause

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Seahawks player Bennett (l) and his buddy the cop-hater Kaepernick.

They aren’t getting a dime from me. Donate some of that millions of dollars the “oppressed” players make.

From MyNorthwest.com: Amid a national conversation about NFL protests during the national anthem, the Seahawks have created a charity to “help build a more compassionate and inclusive society.”

An announcement Friday states:

In an effort to create lasting change and build a more compassionate and inclusive society, we are launching the Seahawks Players Equality & Justice for All Action Fund to support education and leadership programs addressing equality and justice. We invite you to join us in donating and taking action.

The announcement is short on specifics of exactly how the fund will contribute to “education and leadership programs addressing equality and justice.” The effort, however, is a component fund of the Seattle Foundation, which supports philanthropic remedies to disparities between rich and poor.

To get the fund going, the Seahawks are reaching out to 12s and all football fans to donate in a crowdfunding-style campaign. Fans can give once or set up a monthly donation. Donations can be made here.

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Suicide: Seahawks’ Michael Bennett, others ask NFL to support social activism

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Bennett (l) and his buddy Kaepernick. Turning the NFL into full-time social justice activism.

If the NFL goes full SJW for BLM, kiss the league goodbye.

From MyNorthwest.com: Seahawks defensive end Michael Bennett is one of four NFL players that have sent a letter to the NFL requesting support from the league, general managers and owners for community outreach and social justice efforts on the part of its players. The players have also requested that the NFL recognize November as activism awareness month.

“We always have different months (when) we recognize different people or different issues in America, and we felt like that was a big issue,” Bennett told reporters Wednesday when explaining the idea. “We wanted to find a way to recognize it and be able to have that conversation (where) people can find information about things they want to get involved with.”

The 10-page memo, obtained by Yahoo! Sports’ Charles Robinson was reportedly sent to NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell in August by Bennett, Philadelphia Eagles safety Malcolm Jenkins and wide receiver Torrey Smith, and former NFL wide receiver Anquan Bolden. The players requested the following of the league:

“To be clear, we are asking for your support. We appreciate your acknowledgment on the call regarding the clear distinction between support and permission. For us, support means: bear all or part of the weight of; hold up; give assistance to, especially financially; enable to function or act. We need support, collaboration and partnerships to achieve our goal of strengthening the community. There are a variety of ways for you to get involved. Similar to the model we have in place for players to get involved, there are three tiers of engagement based on your comfort level.”

Bennett has been an advocate for social justice issues and routinely speaks out about police brutality, racism, and inequality. This season, Bennett has chosen to sit for the national anthem, telling reporters the gesture is an effort to use his platform to oppose segregation and oppression. Several teammates, including center Justin Britt, defensive ends Cliff Avril and Frank Clark, running back Thomas Rawls, and cornerback Jeremy Lane, have shown public support for Bennett during his silent protest.

“I don’t know what the chances are (that the league accepts our proposal),” Bennett said. “Hopefully, the chances are 100 percent, but we’ll see. It takes a lot for a business or organization to get behind certain issues, and we’re hoping to keep pushing it to see if we can ever get to that place where we can be comfortable with talking about the issues that are going on around the country.”

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Nation Anthem protestor Marshawn Lynch to get new reality show on Facebook

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Marshawn Lynch enjoying a banana during the National Anthem/AP Photo

Marshawn Lynch is a NFL player who plays for the Oakland Raiders. I reported back in August that at the Oakland Raiders’ pre-season opener in Arizona, Marshawn Lynch didn’t stand during the National Anthem. He sat on a cooler eating a banana.

From my post:

Lynch previously backed Kaepernick, telling comedian Conan O’Brien in September 2016, “I’d rather see him take a knee than stand up, put his hands up and get murdered.”

“If you’re really not racist then you won’t see what he done, what he’s doing, as a threat to America, but just addressing a problem that we have,” Lynch said at the time.”

Facebook is rewarding him for his antics. Another show I won’t be watching.

From Seattle Times: Can’t get enough of Marshawn Lynch, the former Seattle Seahawks running back who now plays for some team in California? Well, you can soon watch him in a new reality show that will reportedly debut on Facebook’s recently launched Watch platformaccording to Reuters.

The news service reported that the social-media giant — which launched its new platform for U.S. users in August — is paying Time Warner’s Bleacher Report millions of dollars for the reality show featuring the Skittles-loving NFL player known as Beast Mode. The show, called “No Script,” consists of eight 10- to 15-minute mini-episodes featuring Lynch involved in various hijinks. The first episode will reportedly feature Lynch taking race-car driving lessons “until he ruins the tires of the car.”

Facebook’s purchase of the show, which will reportedly start streaming this month, underscores the intense battle among web-based media companies for original content and for viewers, Reuters reported.

“We think we have a big hit on our hands,” Rory Brown, president of Bleacher Report, told Reuters. “People are going to spend more time on Facebook because of it.”

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