Tag Archives: Seattle School District

Children & teenagers can receive free birth control from Seattle Schools – without parental notification

Note: I’m re-publishing various past posts we were able to recover from Word Press after they shut us down. This step is necessary to have them appear on our new blog.

King5: At least 1,000 high school girls went to the nurse to talk about getting birth control at school, and their parents may never find out, even if they decide to begin treatment. That’s the law, actually. In Washington, minors can access birth control without parental permission — even at school.

Seattle-King County Public Health updated the city council on Wednesday about its school health program providing medical care at 26 middle and high schools in Seattle. The health centers are run by private organizations, like Swedish and Group Health, and are nothing like the nurse’s office you may remember.

The county knows 1,293 high schoolers discussed birth control options, like the pill, IUDs and arm implants, with the school health center. There are no records for the number of high schoolers who decided to get birth control at school. The county says 49 middle schoolers discussed the same options, some as young as 13 years old.

Of the 49 middle school girls, four obtained a long-acting reversible contraceptive (LARC). The health department said no middle school girl obtained an IUD; instead, the 4 girls received an arm-implantable contraceptive device.

Sara Rigel with Seattle Public Health says for the 15-17 year old group there was a 92% reduction in teen birth rates from 1990 to 2013. That’s far better than numbers outside King County where there was only a 62% drop. (No links provided for these statistics.)

In line with state law, student health centers at Seattle Public Schools provide all forms of contraception to all students, including long-acting reversible contraceptives or IUDs. The goal is to lower the number of girls dropping out of school because they become pregnant. And they do so with or without parental notification.

When asked if a child as young as 12 years old could get an IUD through a middle school clinic, Rigel said if a 6th grader asked for birth control, they would be provided it as long as they did not appear to be the victim of abuse. She said the clinic would ask a lot of questions before providing contraception.

I’m all for reducing unwanted pregnancies. But is it acceptable for schools to provide medications without parental knowledge? Just wish some parents would take more interest in their child’s activities and well being.

DCG

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Church's pizza giveaway irks Seattle school cafeteria workers

union-thugs1
Via KOMO News: Since last fall, members of the Bethany Community Church in Seattle’s Green Lake neighborhood have been handing out free slices of pizza at lunch time, but not everyone is happy with the gesture.
“It takes about 10 minutes to get rid of 40 large pizzas,” said youth pastor Nick Steinloski. Steinloski said the pizza giveaway is about connecting kids with adults who care about them. “We are not telling them a Bible story before they get pizza,” he said.
At two slices per student, serving 250 students at each school, he estimates the church spends $600 a week on pizza.
The church serves the pizza just off campus at Nathan Hale, Ingraham, and Roosevelt high schools. It’s once a week, just off campus at each school. A spokeswoman for the Seattle School Districts says the church notified them of the giveaway and it was “ok” with it.
But the union representing the district’s cafeteria workers is not ok with it.
“Last week we got a call from a union,” said Steinloski. “They said we were taking away a job, hours from employees at school in the kitchen because kids weren’t buying lunch.”
He says a union representative left a voice mail on the church’s answering machine claiming handing out free pizza was irresponsible and costing people who serve the food their livelihood, accusing the church of doing whatever it took to proselytize to the students.
“He said that if we stop serving them pizza, we would start serving them drugs,” said Steinloski. “I felt intimidated by that message.”
The business manager for the union confirmed he has complained to the church. Dave Westberg says the union figures the free pizza is replacing roughly 500 purchased meals each week, and that is equal to 20 labor hours. Westberg says workers’ jobs are based on how many meals are sold. If fewer meals are sold, fewer workers are needed to prepare them.
We asked students what they would eat if there wasn’t free pizza. “If they didn’t have free pizza, I’d go home for lunch,” said one Nathan Hale High School student. “I’d buy food from the cafeteria,” said another student.

Would you rather have pizza or one of these: Michelle Obama's mandated school lunchs

Would you rather have pizza or one of these: Michelle Obama’s mandated school lunchs


Nathan Hale High School allows sophomores, juniors and seniors to leave campus for lunch. “That’s why it really doesn’t make sense,” said Malik Johnson, another Nathan Hale student. “Because if we can go down the street and get food from a restaurant, why can’t we come out here and get free pizza that people want to give to us?”
Feeling pressure, the church will change its routine to serving free pizza after school instead of during lunch so there’s no competition with lunchtime sales. “We do care about the workers, we care about the immigrant workers and those working here at the school,” said Steinloski.
Westberg says he hopes the church will adhere to its promise. “We are presuming honesty on pastor Nick’s part that they will stop serving during lunch,” said Westberg. “If they don’t stop we will be picketing.”
For Nathan Hale junior Tajon Williams, the issue wasn’t about lost jobs, it was about eating better pizza. “If they would cook it a little better, then they would have students up there eating, you know what I’m saying?” Williams said.
DCG

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Seattle teachers on strike: Because it's all about "respect"

The strike is  illegal. As you read through this, remember it’s about respect money.
seattle teachers strike
Seattle Times: Teachers across Seattle took to the picket lines Wednesday as thousands of parents seek child-care options and leaders of Seattle Public Schools consider legal action to end a strike that’s the first of its kind in 30 years.
Teachers announced their walkout Tuesday evening, just before the Seattle School Board voted to authorize the superintendent to go to court to try to force them back to work.
Engineering instructor Doug Hartley was among dozens of Cleveland High School employees who cheered for honking cars and waved picket signs saying “On Strike!” at South Lucile Street and 15th Avenue South Wednesday morning.
They started marching down the street at 8:25 a.m., with Hartley giving directions and passing out Seattle Education Association union garb and signs.
“It doesn’t seem like we’re getting much respect from the district. It isn’t about the money or anything else; it’s respect,” he said.
seattle teachers strike2
Hartley has been a Seattle School District employee for more than two decades. And after years of settling for he called “subpar contracts,” he said teachers aren’t going to “roll over” anymore.
“We’ve been putting up for so much for so long. At some point, it’s the tipping point,” he said. “This isn’t vacation for us … I don’t know how many weeks or months it’s going to take. I hope it doesn’t last forever.”
Biology teacher Mike Shaw said that by raising compensation for teachers the district might lower its turnover rate. Teachers are coming to the area to gain experience, he said, and then often move to other places where the pay is higher.
“It’s time for teachers to get paid what they are worth,” Shaw said. “It’s time for Seattle schools to say it with money.”
Members of the union that represents about 5,000 Seattle teachers and other school employees voted Thursday to strike if they failed to reach a consensus with district officials on contract agreements before school was supposed to start. District officials and union leaders have said bargaining will continue, even amid the strike.
The two sides have been in contract talks for months. They reached agreement on a number of issues over the Labor Day weekend, including a guaranteed 30 minutes of recess for elementary students and increased pay for certified and classified substitute teachers. Unresolved issues include pay increases and increased instructional time.
show me the money
The district wants to add 30 minutes to the school day, saying that will increase student achievement and allow more time for physical education, arts and music.
And the district says it has provided raises to teachers over the past several years, even when the state wasn’t providing cost-of-living increases, and said its salary proposal would keep Seattle teachers among the highest paid in the state.
Union leaders said teachers and staff would picket at every Seattle school Wednesday. At Thurgood Marshall Elementary, about 35 teachers and other workers marched down Martin Luther King Jr. Way South with music blasting and drum beats echoing.
Samantha Egelhoff, a fifth-grade teacher, said she wishes the school year could have begun as scheduled. “We would rather be at work,” she said. “It’s not fun, nobody wants to do this.” She said her classroom is prepared for the year’s start, with students’ name tags on their desks and bulletin boards decorated.
On Tuesday, school employees hosted an ice-cream social, where they met their incoming students and then reluctantly bid them farewell in lieu of the strike.
DCG

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