Tag Archives: Seattle Police

An attempt to foster trust: Seattle-area transgender cops featured in HBO documentary

I’m sure this will foster more trust with the Seattle Police…until a victim has to wait more than an hour for the police to respond.

From The News Tribune: Two local transgender law enforcement officers — one a Seattle police officer and the other a King County sheriff’s deputy — are the subjects of a documentary on HBO.

“VICE News Tonight” correspondent Caroline Modarressy-Tehrani interviewed Officer Tori Newburn and sheriff’s Deputy Jamie Deer for the program.

Newburn is the first openly transgender officer on Seattle’s force. He had begun his transition to male when he enrolled in a police academy in 2014. “People wouldn’t know I was transgender unless I told them,” Newburn said.

Deer began his career in the Sheriff’s Office as a woman. When he began to transition he knew he had to come out as transgender.  “I would rather face an armed suspect … than having to come out to 700 co-workers,” Deer said. “To open yourself up like that was terrifying.”

Newburn and Deer said they hope their coming out will foster trust between the transgender community and law enforcement agencies. “It’s a long process to earn trust back when trust has been broken in the past,” Newburn said. “My hope is that me coming out as a transgender police officer will be another layer in building that bridge.”

“Trans Law Enforcement” premiered Thursday on “VICE News Tonight.” It is available on HBO Go, HBO Now and HBO On Demand.

As the transgender community has gained visibility, legislation affecting them has increased in the form of so-called “bathroom bills” that require transgender people in public buildings to use the bathroom that corresponds with the sex on their birth certificate.

In Washington, proponents failed to get a measure on the ballot in 2016.

h/t Maziel!

DCG

ISIS sympathizer, suspected in 3 King County killings, won’t face death penalty

A precedent against the death penalty was set in Washington state when they let Gary Ridgway off the hook. Now an ISIS pig will be on the taxpayer dime for life as well.

King County Prosecuting Attorney Dan Satterberg

King County Prosecuting Attorney Dan Satterberg

From Seattle Times: A man suspected of killing three men in Seattle and Skyway in 2014 will not face the death penalty, King County Prosecuting Attorney Dan Satterberg announced Friday.

Ali Muhammad Brown, 32, is accused of killing Leroy Henderson in Skyway, and Ahmed Said and Dwone Anderson-Young in Seattle. Brown is believed to have fled to New Jersey days after the latter two shootings.

Satterberg said in a news release he decided against seeking the death penalty after reviewing the case and speaking with the victims’ families.

ISIS pig Ali Muhammad Brown

ISIS pig Ali Muhammad Brown

Brown, 32, is charged with three counts of aggravated first-degree murder in King County. Brown is being held in New Jersey, where he recently was sentenced to more than 30 years in prison after being convicted of first-degree robbery and several other crimes. He also is awaiting trial for one count of first-degree murder in Essex County, N.J., as well as another robbery charge in Ocean County, N.J.

It could take more than a year for those cases to be resolved, the prosecutor’s office said in a news release. When that happens, Brown will be returned to King County to face charges.

Prosecutors allege that Brown, a Muslim man, killed the four men in a fit of rage over the U.S. government’s role in the Middle East. He was on a federal terrorism watch list and wrote in his journal that he planned to follow the Islamic State group and “learn the ways of jihadis.”

serious

Brown is accused of fatally shooting Henderson shortly after 11:45 p.m. April 27, 2014, as Henderson was walking home from a Skyway store. Deputies linked Brown to the slaying through the 9 mm bullets and casings found in and around Henderson’s body.

Said was driving Anderson-Young home from R Place, a gay club on Capitol Hill, on June 1, 2014, when they were shot. Brown had reportedly met up with Said over a gay social-networking app, then connected with the two men outside the club that night and got into Said’s car, according to charges.

“The murders took place less than 17 minutes after two witnesses saw Ali Brown leave with the victims in Said’s car. There is no evidence to suggest that Said and/or Anderson-Young were armed, and these murders do not appear to be motivated by robbery, drugs or any other crime,” Seattle police Detective Cloyd Steiger wrote in investigative documents.

In a January 2015 interview with The Seattle Times, Falana Young-Wyatt, mother of Anderson-Young, said she didn’t feel strongly about whether Brown should be condemned to death row. She said she only cared about his swift return to King County to face trial.

“I want him to look me in the face,” she said. “I want him to know my son’s life matters. I just want justice for my son.”

DCG

Federal judge declares ‘black lives matter’ during hearing over Seattle police reform

Judge Robart

Judge Robart

Via Seattle Times: U.S. District Judge James Robart, pointedly reacting to the Seattle police union’s rejection of a tentative contract, said Monday he would not let the powerful labor group hold the city “hostage” by linking wages to constitutional policing.

“To hide behind a collective- bargaining agreement is not going to work,” Robart said during a dramatic court hearing he opened by laying out a path for police-accountability reform and closed with an emotional declaration that “black lives matter.”

Robart, who is presiding over a 2012 consent decree requiring the city to adopt reforms to address Department of Justice allegations of excessive force and biased policing, called for major changes that would directly affect the union’s membership: streamlined appeals of officer discipline and internal investigations conducted by civilians rather than sworn officers.

Kevin Stuckey

SPOG President Kevin Stuckey

Kevin Stuckey, who recently became president of the Seattle Police Officers’ Guild (SPOG) in a power shake-up and listened in court to the judge’s blistering remarks, said the union is prepared to sit down with the city and reach a deal.  “The judge has given us our marching orders,” Stuckey said, insisting the union’s vote this summer to reject the deal was not tied to money but to the leak of confidential contract details to The Stranger newspaper.

Guild members — officers and sergeants — voted 823 to 156 this summer to reject a contract containing a mix of wage hikes and reforms, an outcome one source attributed to too many giveaways without enough in return.

Other sources previously said former SPOG President Rich O’Neill, who in 2008 won big pay raises in exchange for reforms, led the campaign against the package.  O’Neill’s effort indirectly led to Robart’s tongue lashing, during which he said he might formally intervene if he concludes the guild is interfering with reform.

“The court and the citizens of Seattle will not be held hostage for increased payments and benefits … ,” Robart said, adding, “I’m sure the entire city of Seattle would march behind me.” (Oddly enough, no one ever holds the teachers accountable for “holding the kids hostage” when they routinely go on strike [illegally] in Washington State.)

Robart, at the same time, praised the city’s overall reform effort, saying the Police Department had adopted sweeping changes. It has become a national model for de-escalation tactics, he said, and put in place successful crisis intervention techniques, use-of-force reviews and added training on bias-free policing.

Seattle Police Chief O’Toole

Seattle Police Chief O’Toole

He said that the work is not done and that strong leadership is required. “I think we have the right person to do that in Chief O’Toole,” Robart said of Kathleen O’Toole, who listened from the audience.

Last week, Robart issued an order allowing the city to draft police-accountability legislation, as long as he reviews it before it is submitted to the City Council to make sure it does not conflict with the consent decree.

During Monday’s hearing, he provided a blueprint for what he would like to see in the legislation, based on various proposals produced by city officials, the Community Police Commission (CPC) and the court-appointed federal monitor, Merrick Bobb.

Beyond changes to appeals and internal investigations, Robart said he wants the position of civilian director of the Office of Professional Accountability, which handles internal investigations, to be strengthened. He said the city should create the position of inspector general, to be held by a civilian with broad oversight powers. O’Toole, Robart said, should retain the final word on disciplinary decisions.

City Attorney Pete Holmes, speaking for the city, pledged to complete legislation for Robart’s review by Labor Day. Holmes said the city would have to reconcile legislation prepared by Mayor Ed Murray with proposals submitted by the CPC, a temporary citizen-advocacy body created as part of the consent decree.

Robart has clashed in the past with the CPC over its attempt to become a permanent body and expand its powers, saying that can’t be done without the court’s approval. On Monday, Robart said he would not find the CPC in “contempt” over its release last week of a proposed police-accountability ordinance. But he said it went too far. “Some of your provisions cross the line,” he said, citing legitimate input versus management of the department.

Murray is expected to submit a framework for a community oversight panel, but it might be different from the body envisioned by the CPC.

In comments after the hearing, CPC member Isaac Ruiz said the commission was glad Robart established a path forward. “We’ll definitely take the judge’s words … to heart,” Ruiz said, explaining the proposed ordinance was only meant to be recommendations.

The Rev. Harriett Walden, the CPC’s co-chair, said the commission would work with the mayor’s office on drafting a package, with the hope Murray will recommend the CPC be made permanent.

Robart ended the hearing with deeply personal remarks, in which he noted a statistic that showed, nationally, 41 percent of the shootings by police were of blacks, when they represented 20 percent of the population.

“Black lives matter,” he said, drawing a startled, audible reaction in a courtroom listening to the words coming from a federal judge sitting on the bench.

He also said the recent shootings of police officers, including in Dallas, Baton Rouge and, in 2009, of four Lakewood, Pierce County, officers, reflected the importance of the work being done to heal police and community relations.

DCG

Seattle Congressional candidate allegedly driving stolen van claims police ‘conspiracy’

Demorat, of course.

wineberry for congress

From MyNorthwest.com: Jesse Wineberry, a Seattle Democrat running for Congress, was detained after driving a van that was reported stolen and being extremely uncooperative with police. And now he’s claiming a “conspiracy” to stifle his political career, according to a police report.

Seattle Police Officer Benjamin Flick found a red Toyota that had been reported stolen in the 1500 block of Occidental Avenue South on July 20, according to the report. Wineberry, 61, was the driver and was asked repeatedly to exit the vehicle but did not comply.

After being asked three times to exit the van, he began to drive away from the officers but was quickly stopped. On the fifth command, Wineberry finally started to comply. But Wineberry again ignored police commands, even with more officers arriving.

Wineberry, according to the report, would not “place his hands behind his back” even after being asked nine times. Instead, he told them to “Stop f****ing with me.” He then resisted arrest, refusing to allow officers to place handcuffs on his wrist. At one point, Wineberry allegedly “place[d] his left hand onto the … gun belt of one of the officers.” At the time, he denied reaching for the officer’s gun.

Finally, Wineberry was placed in handcuffs but refused to sit in the back of the patrol car. When taken to the South Precinct, the report says Wineberry “…accused officers of being part of a conspiracy to derail his campaign for being the first African-American member of the Washington state Congress.”

He may now be doubling down on his claims. In a press conference on Thursday, Wineberry says he was racially profiled by police, even though he admits the van he was in was reported stolen after a “misunderstanding with the rental-car company,” The Seattle Times reports. The Times reports that Wineberry’s staff didn’t extend the rental agreement, something he was unaware of.

“I think I was stopped because of the vehicle,” he said, according to Times. “I think the way I was treated was because I was African-American.” In an interview with Q13, he claims an officer was giving the other officers “…code to shoot me.”

“I wanted to make sure that I was not going to be a victim of what I believe to be code language to authorize the use of lethal force in that situation,” Wineberry said. “If it can happen to me, it can happen to anybody.”

Only, it didn’t happen to him. The report concludes he refused multiple commands from officers. At one point, he seemingly attempted to drive away, and he had his hand on the gun belt of an officer. He wasn’t mistreated; he was given considerable opportunities to comply. In fact, this situation does more to combat the claim that cops are going out of their way to mistreat black suspects.

Watch the Seattle Police video at the MyNorthwest.com web site here.

DCG

35-year Seattle police veteran saves man’s life while off duty

Police protect and serve shield patch

From MyNorthwest.com: After 35 years as a Seattle police officer, and being the first woman ever to be a Seattle motorcycle cop, Seattle bike patrol figured she’d been though just about everything. “I’m near the end of my career,” she said. “I never thought I’d have the opportunity to save somebody’s life.”

But ten days ago, while off duty, Martin suddenly ran into a life-and-death crisis while driving to a hair appointment. “Something was in the cards,” she said. “I mean, I called for that hair appointment that day. How many times do you get a hair appointment the same day?”

While driving her car northbound on Bellevue’s Lakemont Boulevard, she saw a car cross over the centerline toward incoming traffic, and then swerve back, before slamming into a concrete barrier. Both Martin another driver stopped.

“When I got out of my car, I turned to her and just gave her that (phone) motion, and said “call 911.” she said. “I walked up to his car, I opened the door and I could see he was in some kind of medical distress.”

The unconscious 42-year-old man behind the wheel had just gone into cardiac arrest. Martin said he was not breathing, had no pulse, and there was a dog and a child with him in the car. “That boy was just confused,” she said. “It was just heartbreaking.”

Martin pulled the man onto the busy street and immediately started CPR, which she said, seemed to have little effect — at first. The man was not breathing, but Martin was working to keep blood pumping to his brain.

Martin gave the man a fighting chance to live. Bellevue firefighters and paramedics attempted to start the man’s heart with a defibrillator. Martin said the man not only survived, doctors let him go home from Overlake Hospital three days later.

Martin, who lost her father to a heart attack when he was only 52, said she was sensitive to the boy’s trauma. She said she comforted the little boy, while his father was with paramedics.

“I wanted to go over and talk to him,” she said. “I didn’t want to leave him the impression that I thought the outcome was going to be anything but positive. I just told him to think about his dad, and I wanted him to know I did my very best.”

Martin said her best was relying on the CPR training she had taken for years. “I think everyone should know it,” she said. “CPR has changed over the years. There’s no (mouth to mouth) breaths. What you’re trying to do is keep blood and oxygen pumping to the brain.”

DCG

Off-duty Seattle cop rescues woman from burning pickup

Even off-duty they are there to serve and protect, not that this matters to the BLM crowd.

Police protect and serve shield patch

From Seattle Times: An off-duty Seattle police officer pulled a woman from a burning truck Monday night after a crash near Snoqualmie.

Officer JD Smith was driving home on Interstate 90 when he got caught in a traffic backup, according to a post on the department’s online SPD Blotter.

“I’m in the far left lane and see the back of this pickup truck in the air,” Smith said. “And boom it’s on fire. I just happened to be right there.” Smith said he ran over to the truck and spotted a woman lying in the front seat as the truck burst into flames.

“I couldn’t get the door open. I just pulled 10 — I dunno how many times,” he said. Smith says he managed to pulled the door open when “that superhuman strength kicked in.” With the help of a bystander, Smith was able to get the woman out just before the truck exploded.

Smith credits a reserve firefighter, a retired Seattle Fire Department firefighter, a doctor from Harborview Medical Center and another bystander for their help in rescuing and stabilizing the woman at the scene.

Eastside Fire and Rescue crews got the fire under control and treated two other injured people. The injured woman’s condition was not immediately known.

DCG

Backlash over statement leads to Seattle police union president’s resignation

I’d say Smith was justified in his rant considering that this minority movement celebrated the death of the Dallas Police officers, chanted for dead cops, and support cop killer Assata Shakur.

Ron Smith/KIRO 7 Photo

Ron Smith/KIRO 7 Photo

From MyNorthwest.com: President of the Seattle Police Officers’ Guild Ron Smith says he will resign July 31 over a controversial statement he made on social media, KIRO 7 reports.

“I posted out of emotion,” Smith explained. The post was supposed to be in support of Dallas police and in support of Dallas police, he added. “It was blown out of proportion.”

The Seattle Police Officers’ Guild deleted its Facebook and Twitter accounts after a post regarding the Dallas shooting that left five officers dead drew criticism. The post read:

“Dallas PD and their officers are in our thoughts and prayers…. The hatred of law enforcement by a minority movement is disgusting… Heads in swivels brothers and sisters…#Weshallovercome”

“My words have been taken out of context, for that I am very sorry, and we have to move on,” Smith said. KING 5 reports the statement led to nearly two dozen complaints of racial bias.

The Guild post was published right around the time the decision was made to have officers patrol in pairs as precaution.

Last week, Seattle council member Tim Burgess said “sometimes the police union leadership are their own worst enemies,” The Stranger reports. “They fire off these statements and then take them down. It’s terrible, because it reflects an inner cycle of thinking that is very negative and disrespectful.”

However, Burgess also says that Seattle officers deserve respect. He wrote on his blog on July 8: “These officers deserve our respect and gratitude and, in the aftermath of last night’s terror, our encouragement and support. They also deserve to be held to a high standard of behavior. I believe strong support and robust accountability go hand in hand.”

DCG