Tag Archives: sanctuary cities

Sacramento neighborhood cops may be allowed to arrest undocumented immigrants

illegalHeadline should read “arrest illegal aliens.” Other than that, this works for me.

From Sacramento Bee: If you’re an undocumented immigrant illegal alien in the city of Sacramento, the local police are under orders not to inquire about your citizenship. The same goes in the unincorporated areas of Sacramento County patrolled by the Sacramento Sheriff’s Department.

Venture outside the region’s main urban centers, however, and police may be operating under different guidelines.

At least six law enforcement agencies in the Sacramento area operate under written policies allowing their officers to detain people suspected of entering the United States illegally, according to policy manuals obtained by The Bee.

For people arrested for certain drug offenses who “may not be a citizen of the United States,” the policies read, officers “shall notify” federal immigration agents if the suspect is not booked into county jail. Officers in the six jurisdictions, which include Folsom and unincorporated Yuba and Yolo counties, can also inform federal immigration agents of the immigration and citizenship status of anyone they encounter.

Some local departments with tough immigration policies on their books are now revising their guidelines as the Trump administration ramps up enforcement of the nation’s immigration laws and immigrant communities grow increasingly wary of law enforcement. Others insist they do not engage in any level of immigration enforcement, despite what their written policies permit.

The policy manuals in all six jurisdictions were written by Lexipol, an Irvine-based private firm that comes up with policies for most of California’s small and mid-size law enforcement agencies. In addition to immigration, Lexipol policies cover a wide range of topics, including departments’ use of force guidelines and advice on how officers should conduct themselves when off-duty.

Immigration enforcement is permitted by the Yolo and Yuba county sheriff’s departments, and the police departments in Galt, Citrus Heights, Folsom and Lincoln. Several local law enforcement agencies did not respond to Bee requests to see their policies. By contrast, Sacramento has repeatedly declared itself a so-called sanctuary city that does not cooperate with federal immigration authorities, a stance that has put the city at odds with the Trump administration.

Lexipol program director Kevin Piper said the policies are based on federal and state laws, as well as “best practices nationwide that have proven successful for law enforcement.” The final wording of an agency’s immigration policy is “completely a local jurisdiction decision,” he said. “We give them a policy that is adaptable whether they are a sanctuary city or completely the opposite,” he said. “We constantly tell our clients that one of the reasons they may want to customize is that their community may want something different.”

The American Civil Liberties Union has begun tracking which California law enforcement agencies use Lexipol immigration policies. Julia Harumi Mass, a senior staff attorney with the ACLU, said policies that allow even limited cooperation between local agencies and the federal Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agency “can still send the wrong message to the local community.”

“The Sacramento Police Department and other California police departments understand the harm that comes when local police and sheriffs engage in immigration enforcement,” she said.

Read the rest of the story here.

DCG

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Mexico Criticizes New Texas ‘Sanctuary City’ Law

small violin

Imagine my distress…

From Yahoo: The Mexican government is expressing regret over a new Texas ban on so-called sanctuary cities, saying the law could step on the rights of its citizens who choose to live just across the border.

The Secretary of Foreign Relations on Monday said in a statement that the Texas law signed by Republican Gov. Greg Abbott “criminalizes even more the phenomenon of immigration.” It says the law foments racial discrimination and will reduce collaboration between police and immigrant communities.

Mexico is Texas’ largest trading partner and shares close ties with the state.

Abbott on Sunday night signed the bill that allows police to ask a person about their immigration status during routine traffic stops. He says the law does away with those who “seek to promote lawlessness in Texas.”

San Antonio’s police chief says the department will abandon a policy prohibiting officers in the nation’s seventh-largest city from asking about a person’s immigration status due to Texas’ new law banning so-called sanctuary cities.

Chief William McManus on Monday ripped Republican lawmakers over the law signed Sunday night, which opponents say is the nation’s most anti-immigrant law since an Arizona crackdown in 2010.

Texas’ law takes effect in September and will allow police officers to ask about a person’s immigration status during routine stops. McManus says that could include people even stopped for jaywalking. He says a written department policy prohibiting questions about immigration status was added several years ago following community meetings.

Abbott says the law will help fulfill a duty to keep “dangerous criminals off our streets.”

Critics say it will lead to Hispanics being racially profiled.

DCG

Sacramento may start paying for legal defense of illegal aliens

darrell steinberg

Mayor Steinberg: Robbing legal taxpayers to benefit illegal aliens

Just following in the footsteps of their fellow proggies in liberal King County. Suck it, taxpayers!

From Sacramento Bee: Sacramento leaders are poised to spend up to $300,000 to boost the city’s status as a sanctuary for undocumented immigrants, even as the federal government threatens to crack down on jurisdictions providing such immigrant protections.

The City Council will vote Thursday on a proposal to invest in an education and legal defense network for undocumented immigrants illegal aliens, with the money coming out of a general fund that supports most core city services. The plan under consideration would also strengthen Sacramento’s status as a sanctuary city by turning into law privacy policies that prohibit city employees – including police – from making inquiries into immigration status.

“It is a modest investment, but it is a very important investment,” said Mayor Darrell Steinberg. “It says very clearly to our community, especially those who are affected by these unconstitutional orders, that ‘we are going to stand with you.’ We have to back up our values with real action to help people who feel at risk and who may be actually at risk.”

Both the sanctuary city ordinance and legal defense fund were proposed by a Safe Haven Task Force formed at City Hall in February. The task force was put in place in response to executive orders by President Donald Trump calling for increased enforcement of federal immigration laws.

Councilman Eric Guerra, who headed the task force, said turning the city’s sanctuary stance from policy into law would put “more teeth” in its position and “makes it relevant to the context we see today, the scapegoating of immigrants.”

About 49,000 Sacramento residents are not citizens, including roughly 4,100 children, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. That’s about 10 percent of the city’s residents. Some of them are here legally, some are not – the census bureau does not ask about legal status.

The new money would help fund what is being called the Sacramento Family Unity, Educations and Legal Network for Immigrants, or FUEL, a collection of local immigration attorneys, nonprofits and law schools specializing in immigration law.

The group will hire up to two attorneys to provide legal assistance to an estimated 750 families each year and conduct “Know Your Rights” information sessions in schools, churches and other community gathering places for hundreds more. The network will likely seek grants from other nonprofit agencies to expand its financial capacity.

Attorneys will be tasked with representing immigrants facing deportation and helping undocumented parents “prepare for the worst” by creating guardianships for children and protections for homes and other assets should they be deported, said Guerra.

Guerra said Sacramento hasn’t yet seen federal immigration raids, but “the fear is intense” in immigrant communities and “what we don’t want is families to be separated because that leads to bigger social issues.”

Blake Nordahl, a supervising attorney in the immigration clinic at the McGeorge School of Law, said the network will expand the local roster of attorneys trained in immigration law by working with lawyers whose expertise is in other fields.

“We have a large immigrant population in Sacramento, so hopefully this is just the beginning of being able to work together,” said Nordahl, whose clinic is part of the city-funded network. “I think there’s a real commitment to showing respect to our neighbors and recognizing that Sacramento is based on a city of immigrants and we’re going to take care of our neighbors.”

Sacramento’s vote would follow other California governments that have spent public money to aid undocumented immigrants.

Santa Clara County in January voted to spend $1.5 million over two years to help defend undocumented immigrants illegal aliens facing deportation. San Francisco recently set aside $200,000 for legal aid, and Oakland has allocated $300,000 for a similar effort. A similar public-private fund that could hold up to $10 million has also been proposed for Los Angeles city and county.

Read the rest of the story here.

DCG

Chicago’s ‘Mexico of the Midwest’ Fights Fallout From Fear of Trump

Little Village

From NBC News: It’s Friday night and time for the “marcha de cumpleaños” (birthday march) at Mi Tierra restaurant in the Chicago neighborhood of Little Village. Waiters bring cupcakes with lit, oversized sparklers, while patrons don straw hats and, paying no attention to empty tables, snake through the dining room to a Latino beat in a conga line.

“Fiesta. Happy,” is how Mi Tierra owner Ezequiel Fuentes describes the good times in culturally vibrant and economically vital Little Village — or as the community calls it, La Villita, a historic section in southwest Chicago that is billed as the Mexico of the Midwest.

But since the start of the year, fear of President Donald Trump has been spoiling the “fiesta” of Little Village, business owners and regular visitors said. Despite Chicago’s sanctuary city status, the uncertainty of when or whether immigration agents might strike is sapping the bustle from the 2½-mile stretch of quinceañera shops, restaurants, shoe and clothing stores, dental offices and other businesses that line W. 26th Street, the community’s main drive.

Locals say they see evidence that something has changed since January. Dozens of carved, brightly painted chairs and tables of Mi Tierra’s second dining room sat empty one weekend last month. Some tables in the main dining area also were unused. At lunchtime, half of the tables hid behind a partition awaiting customers.

“After the elections, everything changed,” said Fuentes, a former undocumented immigrant who now owns several restaurants in four states. “People are scared. They are scared to go out. The decrease of business (after the election) probably was 40 percent during the week, especially in the day time.”

Other business owners echo this sentiment. Vendors on the street corners complain that they no longer see the crowds walking up and down the neighborhood’s main street and lining up at their carts to buy their “elote” (Mexican grilled corn) and raspados (shaved ice sweetened with natural syrups). The usual buzz amid the selling of mariachi suits, clothing, jewelry, curios, accordions and many other goods at the Discount Mall outside Little Village’s welcoming arch is dampened.

Business leaders have been trying to tamp down the fear they think is driving the slowdown, reminding the community of Chicago’s historic sanctuary city status, and enlisting the mayor and police chief to dispel anxieties. They tell them there are no arrests going on in the neighborhood, that the Chicago police and local agencies don’t cooperate with the feds or question the immigration or citizenship status of residents because Chicago is a sanctuary city.

Exuding confidence in the city’s sanctuary status has taken on an urgency as news stories of arrests of immigrants with DACA – a type of protection from deportation – and people with immigration violations but not criminal histories fill the national news. The administration has threatened to punish cities that don’t cooperate with Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE).

“I would tell people here in La Villita to not be afraid, to get well informed, find [out] for each other if ICE is coming. Get communication through police. Come out and support our families, our businesses,” said Ezequiel Fuentes Jr., who works with his father in running their restaurants. “La Villita is a great place. We can make it even greater.”

Two days after the Mi Tierra celebration, residents came together at La Villita for a community meeting where some of the topics discussed included how to prepare for possible deportation, what rights people have if arrested and shopping local. The meeting’s title: “La Villita Se Defiende.” (“Little Village Defends Itself.”)

Read the rest of the story here.

DCG

NYPD has refused all ICE detainer requests this year

pic

Claro que si.

From NY Post: Federal immigration authorities have made 109 requests to the NYPD to detain people since Jan. 1 — and the city hasn’t helped out on any of them.

Larry Byrne, the NYPD’s deputy commissioner on legal matters, revealed the figure Monday. “We’ve honored zero of them so far, none,” he said.

Byrne added that only three of the requests qualified for assistance under the city law providing sanctuary for undocumented immigrants.

Part of the law allows the NYPD to hold someone for 48 hours while Immigrations and Customs Enforcement agents obtain a warrant. “In all three of those instances, the person was transferred to the custody of the Department of Corrections before the 48-hour time elapsed,” Byrne said. “So we honored zero detainers.”

President Trump has vowed to withhold federal funding to sanctuary cities that don’t cooperate with his efforts to deport more undocumented immigrants with criminal records.

Councilman Joe Borelli (R-Staten Island) said the city should be more transparent about how it handles detainer requests. “The public should really be given the details of why these folks were arrested and allowed to make their own judgement calls,” he said. “These could be burglars, gang members and violent criminals. City Hall should own this entire policy and be held accountable if any of these particular people become repeat offenders.

Mayor de Blasio described the city law as “just and balanced.”

“It was never legally challenged by anyone,” he said. “It’s a third way in this whole national discussion because it protects the safety of people here without demonizing all immigrants.”

DCG

Seattle wants $1M legal-defense fund for immigrants facing deportation

Council member and illegal alien lover, Tim Burgess


Seattle has a MAJOR homelessness problem and they want to use tax payer dollars to protect illegals. Keep it up proggies…

From Seattle Times: A day after suing President Donald Trump over his executive order on so-called “sanctuary cities,” Seattle officials said the city plans to set up a $1 million legal-defense fund for immigrants the federal government attempts to deport.

Pending City Council approval, the money would be allocated through a competitive process to nonprofit organizations that provide legal representation to people with cases in immigration court, Councilmembers M. Lorena González and Tim Burgess said at a news conference Thursday.

Immigration-court cases are civil proceedings because living in the country illegally is a civil violation rather than a criminal one, the council member said. Unlike in criminal cases, people of modest means facing immigration charges aren’t guaranteed a public defender.

“This legal-defense fund means that when our immigrant and refugee families, friends and neighbors go to immigration court, they will not be alone,” González said.

“We will stand hand in hand with these families as they defend their right to remain in this country.”

The organizations receiving money would be expected to use it to serve immigrants with limited financial resources — people unable to hire their own attorneys.

People represented by legal counsel in immigration-court proceedings are 10 times more likely to win the right to remain in the country, González said, citing a national American Immigration Council study.

But more than one-third of people with immigration-court cases in Seattle and more than 90 percent of those with cases in Tacoma lack legal representation, the council member said.

“Compare that to the government, who is represented by an experienced immigration attorney 100 percent of the time,” she said, noting that even children appear in immigration court without representation. “This is patently unfair.”

Trump’s “mass deportation plan” is targeting “virtually all undocumented persons living and working in this country, even if they are doing so peacefully,” she said.

Read the rest of the story here.

DCG

Claro que si: Malibu, California becomes a sanctuary city

malibu city council

Council member Laura Rosenthal (center)

Apparently no one’s baby or house in Malibu is being properly cared for without the labor of illegal aliens.

FYI: In 2010, Malibu had a median household income of $133,869.

From Sacramento Bee: Taking a stand in the national debate over illegal immigration, Malibu has joined the ranks of sanctuary cities. The City Council of the celebrity enclave voted 3-2 this month to approve a resolution prohibiting use of city funds and resources to enforce federal civil immigration law.

Councilwoman Laura Rosenthal introduced the resolution after Malibu resident and actor Martin Sheen appeared before the council in December to urge a sanctuary designation.

“When I reached out to some of the people at the schools and other people in the community, they told me people are scared,” Rosenthal told the Los Angeles Times. “That’s people coming into Malibu who may be undocumented. I wanted to send a clear message that we are here for you.

A report by the city attorney cited the potential for some “negative fiscal impacts” due to an executive order by President Donald Trump directing the attorney general and secretary of the Department of Homeland Security to ensure that sanctuary jurisdictions do not receive federal grants.

The report said the city receives annually about $46,000 in community development block grant funds from the U.S. Department of Housing and Development. Malibu also occasionally receives one-time grants from federal agencies but currently has none that are active.

Immigrants work throughout the city, according to Juan Escobar, 32, who works at the Malibu Country Mart. “You see Spanish speakers taking care of babies in every house,” he told the Times. “They help people here.”

Resolution supporter Mikke Pierson, 57, said it is important to express support for people who are in the country illegally. “Heck, we would be paralyzed and no one’s houses would be cleaned,” the former surf shop owner said.

DCG