Tag Archives: San Francisco Police Department

Why you need the Second Amendment: Six men storm into California home during early morning invasion

why I need an ar-15

Hey #GunControlNow crowd, please tell me why you believe one doesn’t need large capacity magazines to defend themselves against SIX intruders?

From SFGate: Six men armed with a handgun and prybar invaded a Bayview (CA) home early Sunday morning to rob three people, authorities said.

The incident occurred just before 1:30 a.m. on the 1900 block of Carroll Avenue, according to a San Francisco Police Department report.

The victims, two men in their 50s and one woman in her 60s, were reportedly sleeping when the suspects broke down the front door. Police said the suspects robbed the victims at gunpoint and made off with a purse, cash, cell phones, laptops and a tablet.

In addition to a handgun, police said the suspects were also armed with a prybar.

The suspects are described as six males between the ages of 25 and 30. At least one of the victims was injured, but none of the injuries were life threatening, police said.

Anyone with information is asked to call the SFPD 24 Hour Tip Line at (415) 575-4444 or Text a Tip to TIP411 and begin the message with SFPD. Witnesses can remain anonymous.

DCG

Despite protests, San Francisco police will get Tasers next year

taser

Liberal logic: Somehow this has something to do with Trump.

And why do demorats always desire to give criminals more power?

From SF Gate: The San Francisco Police Department can begin equipping its officers with Taser electroshock weapons in December 2018, the Police Commission said late Friday in a vote on an issue that has been debated and rejected in the city for 13 years.

Following an almost seven-hour meeting interrupted by a raucous protest that led to a lockdown of City Hall, commissioners narrowly passed a measure that the police officers union and several past police chiefs have long supported in the face of strong opposition from activists and critics of the department.

While members of the department’s top brass remained straight-faced during the hard-fought, 4-3 vote in favor of the plan, activists outside the chamber began chanting, “Shame! Shame!” — a sentiment echoed by Commissioner Petra DeJesus, a longtime opponent of the weapon.

“I think it’s incredibly sad in this age of Trump and Black Lives Matters, when our own officers are involved in shootings of minorities and mentally ill, that this commission is seriously considering voting for Tasers after all these years,” she said. “I was hoping this commission would do the right thing.”

San Francisco has one of the last major police forces in the country without the devices, in part because of the opposition from community members concerned about the weapons’ lethality and the potential for abuse.

But those in favor of Tasers, including police Chief Bill Scott, who took command in January amid controversy over a series of officer-involved shootings, say officers need less-lethal alternatives to firearms and Tasers provide such an option.

On Friday, Commission Vice President Thomas Mazzucco echoed Scott’s sentiments, citing a U.S. Department of Justice report last year that said San Francisco “should strongly consider” giving officers stun guns.

“In conversations with many people from the Department of Justice, they couldn’t believe we didn’t have these,” Mazzucco said. “They believe it will save lives.”

The report was the result of a six-month review of the city police force after officers fatally shot Mario Woods in December 2015. Woods, a stabbing suspect who was still carrying a knife, was shot while shuffling slowly along a Bayview neighborhood street, after efforts to subdue him with beanbags rounds and pepper spray failed.

The killing is still under investigation, but following the shooting, the Police Commission revised the department’s use-of-force policy to put more of an emphasis on the sanctity of life, deploying de-escalation tactics and using force as a last resort.

“De-escalation has been a topic that the San Francisco Police Department has taken very seriously,” Scott said Friday, as he made his case for Tasers. “The reality is there are times when de-escalation does not work and officers have to use force as safely as possible. We have a duty to reduce injuries to residents and officers when these type of incidents occur.”

But Commission President L. Julius Turman, who voted against the measure, said equipping officers with Tasers “will derail the progress we have made.” Commissoner Bill Ong Hing, who also voted no, said he had concerns about the studies that found officers use these weapons disproportionately on communities of color — communities with whom the department has been working to rebuild trust as part of the reform efforts.

“It’s the wrong message to be sending to the community to adopt Tasers right now,” Hing said. “It’ll put us so far back in terms of the achievements that this department has made with respect to credibility.”

While Friday’s vote did not delve into policy for Taser use, Scott has said he wants all sworn officers to be equipped with the weapon. As part of the vote, commissioners said officers could not begin using the weapons until December 2018, after the revised use-of-force policy has been in place for two years.

Commissioner Sonia Melara said she received about 100 letters in support of Tasers from community members, and a handful spoke at the meeting. But dozens more spoke in opposition. Activists speaking out against Tasers shut down the meeting for about an hour and prompted deputies to lock down City Hall.

“Please try (a Taser) on yourself before you make the decision,” activist Maria Cristina Gutierrez said just before she went beyond the two-minute allotment allowed for each speaker during public comment and Turman called the meeting into recess.

The activists remained in the room, chanting and making speeches against the weapons, as the commissioners filed out and reconvened in another room.

Read the rest of the story here.

DCG

SFPD union’s dog photo called insult to Black Lives Matter cause

Naturally.

all labs matter

From SF Gate: The union representing San Francisco police officers published a photograph of two dogs in its monthly newspaper that critics say belittles the Black Lives Matter movement and raises questions about the police force’s commitment to repairing its relationship with communities of color.

The picture, which appeared on the back page of the August issue of the San Francisco Police Officers Association Journal, shows a pair of Labrador retrievers, one black and one white. The black dog has a sign around its neck reading, “Black Labs Matter,” while the white dog sports a sign reading, “All Labs Matter.”

The photo, submitted by a union supporter, is accompanied by a plea from the union: “Maybe it’s time we all just sit back and tone down the rhetoric,” a reference to many months of heated national debate over police shootings and, recently, the targeted slayings of police officers.

The photo weighs in on a controversy that has flared on social media and has animated political debates. Some people have countered the phrase “Black lives matter” by saying, “All lives matter,” and they in turn have been accused of objecting to a simple request that black people be treated fairly.

People in the Black Lives Matter movement have sought to explain that the focus on black lives is appropriate because black people are disproportionately profiled and killed by police.

Yulanda Williams

Yulanda Williams

The dog photo “once again shows a severe lack of understanding,” said Sgt. Yulanda Williams, president of Officers for Justice, an organization within the San Francisco police force representing African American and other nonwhite officers. “It’s so inflammatory, and they still don’t get it. They still choose to inflame situations, and it’s just really insulting.”

The Police Department and acting Chief Toney Chaplin declined to comment.

Union officials did not immediately comment to a request for comment on the journal photo, but Union President Martin Halloran pointed to a radio ad put out by the union about the recent attacks on police officers.

“In light of the rising violence against police officers, we hope everyone can start to turn down the volume,” Halloran says in the ad. “Anti-police rhetoric has been cited as a contributing factor to the violence against police officers. I think we can all do better and the police will do our part. We will continue with our best efforts to build bridges of communication and understanding between us and the community that we serve.”

Read the whole story here.

DCG