Tag Archives: San Francisco Board of Supervisors

Needles, feces & drugs, oh my! SF Board of Supervisors rewarded with 12% raise

The “professionals” on the SF Board of Supervisors

Imagine being so handsomely rewarded for turning your once beautiful city into a sh*thole. It pays well to be a public servant…

From SF Gate: San Francisco’s supervisors will be getting a 12% raise this year, more than three times the size of those being given to other elected officials and city employees.

The raise was approved by a 3-1 vote of the Civil Service Commission on Monday and represents a $15,016 pay hike, bringing the board members’ salaries to $140,148 this year — plus benefits.

“I felt the boost was appropriate to bring the pay more in line with the responsibilities of the job,” said Commission President F.X. Crowley, a former labor leader who ran for the board himself in 2012.

The supervisors’ pay hike, however, was far above the $5,005-a-year raise recommended by the Civil Service Commission staff.

The staff report, which surveyed cities and counties statewide, recommended they receive the same 4% raise this fiscal year as other city workers and elected officials — that would have given them about $125,000, plus benefits. Most city workers are getting 11% spread out over three years.

Instead, the commission voted to give the supervisors the 12% boost this year, with annual cost-of-living increases in succeeding years.

Under the City Charter, every five years the commission sets the salary for the supervisors and other elected officials.

Given that the annual cost-of-living increase has been running at about 3% a year, the supervisors could see a total pay raise of 24% or more over the next five years.

In a surprise move, Board of Supervisors clerk Angela Calvillo presented the commission with the salary survey she requested from a Board of Supervisors budget and legislative analyst.
The survey compared the supervisors’ pay to supervisors in other counties. The analyst also measured their pay in relation to the counties’ overall budget.

Calvillo said she did not share the report with the board.

Crowley said he looked at both surveys and concluded the commission staff’s recommendation was “artificially low” for a county with an annual $11 billion budget. “That’s a billion dollars a supervisor,” Crowley said. “We want professionals making professional decisions.”

The streets of San Francisco…

Read the whole story here.

DCG

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Liberal utopia of San Francisco: MacArthur Foundation gives $2M grant to DA to “thin out” jails

San Francisco DA George Gascon: Working hard for George Soros…

The MacArthur Foundation is a left-wing private organization based in Chiraq. Their focus is mass incarceration and “non-profit” journalism. But don’t let the Wikipedia page fool you – they are as far left as George Soros and his Open Society Foundation.

In fact, The MacArthur Foundation and George Soros have a history, to the surprise of no one.

Back in 2016, Newsbusters reported that The MacArthur Foundation gave grants to 12 non-profit media organizations to support “accurate, in-depth journalism,” but at least eight are well-supported by lefty billionaire George Soros. From their report: “In the next five years, The MacArthur Foundation will give nearly $19 million to groups which have been funded by Soros and another $6 million to other media-related organizations.”

According to American Thinker, ProPublica (the investigative-reporting foundation financed by George Soros) is also financed by The MacArthur Foundation.

So what is the progressive MacArthur Foundation’s solution for overcrowded jails? Release the criminals!

SF Chronicle reports that the San Francisco district attorney’s office received a $2 million grant from the MacArthur Foundation that it will use in a bid to reduce the city’s inmate population and wipe out a looming need for a new city jail over the next two years, officials said Tuesday.

More from their report:

“District Attorney George Gascón outlined a plan in which his office will collaborate with experts and other criminal justice agencies to expedite cases, analyze outcomes and reduce recidivism. A focus of the reforms, Gascón said, will be inmates whose repeated troubles trace to mental illness and addiction. The goal is to reduce the jail population — which generally hovers around 1,250 — by 16 percent in two years.

“What we’re doing today hasn’t worked for a long time,” Gascón said. “So this is really a down payment on the creation of a blueprint to take us into the 21st century.”

The effort comes as lawmakers work to reduce the city’s jail population after the Board of Supervisors in 2015 voted not to allocate $215 million for a project to begin replacing the run-down jail at the Hall of Justice. County Jail No. 4 is seismically unsafe and has no room for many programs provided to inmates at other city facilities.

Instead of building a new jail, city leaders in 2016 created a 39-member working group tasked with identifying and funding programs designed to reduce what are known as occupied bed days. According to estimates, San Francisco must reduce bed days by 83,220 a year to close County Jail No. 4.

The group has a hearing at the Board of Supervisors Public Safety and Neighborhood Services Committee on Wednesday.

Even as the city has funded new departments to chip away at the jail population, and as recent bail-reform efforts prompt more inmates to be released before trial, the jails have not significantly thinned. That’s because most of the recent programs target lower-level offenders, and inmates who spend 15 days or less in jail occupy only about 3 percent of all bed days, said a report this year by the city Controller’s Office. Inmates who spend 180 days or more in jail take up about 78 percent of bed days, the report found.

Gascón, who has opposed building a new jail, hopes the approach funded by the MacArthur Foundation grant can reduce the jail population enough to close County Jail No. 4.

“We have done a lot of things, but we’re still basically in the same place that we were three years ago,” he said.

The grant will fund services for inmates, a policy analyst for San Francisco Superior Court, and another analyst to study who is in custody. The district attorney’s office will bring in experts to collect data and identify ways to reduce the jail population.

“We still have a recurring problem and it’s our high recidivism rate,” Gascón said. We have the same people coming in and out. That’s a system failure.”

Around 40 percent of the jail population receives psychiatric treatment and 15 percent suffer from a serious mental illness, according to the city legislative analyst’s office. Even so, people in custody wait 120 days on average for a bed in a community-based residential treatment program — more than five times the wait in the community, said Tara Anderson, director of policy at the district attorney’s office.

“If we can expedite people to treatment and expedite their case through the system, we shorten lengths of stay and simultaneously reduce the number of times someone is coming into custody,” she said.”

Read the whole story here.

I love how they assume that once out of jail, mentally-ill criminals will show up to scheduled psychiatric treatment appointments.

Just what the city of San Francisco needs: More mentally ill and addicted folks roaming the streets! Brilliant solution, proggies.

DCG

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