Tag Archives: Ryan Murphy

Suck it Hollyweird: Ratings for 2018 Emmy Awards hit all-time low

From Fox News: Hollywood may have laughed when Emmys host Michael Che said the only white people who thank Jesus are “Republicans and ex-crackheads,” but Tinseltown’s latest middle finger to Middle America fell flat in flyover country, and may have contributed to the telecast’s all-time low viewership.

Co-host Michael Che left many viewers of the 70th Annual Emmy Awards upset during the opening monologue with his fellow “Saturday Night Live” star Colin Jost, explaining that his mother would not be watching the show on Monday night.

“She says she doesn’t like watching white award shows because you guys don’t thank Jesus enough,” Che said. “That’s true. The only white people that thank Jesus are Republicans and ex-crackheads.

The joke didn’t sit well with some viewers, who took to Twitter to complain. Not only that, the show’s ratings dropped 10 percent from last year’s already-dismal numbers, setting an all-time low, according to TheWrap.

While many viewers may have changed the channel after the opening monologue, jabs at average Americans were far from over and the Jesus gag became a running theme throughout the evening.

Conservative strategist Chris Barron told Fox News that “large swaths of the American public just want to be entertained” but instead were turned into “unwilling participants” in a political rally disguised as an awards show.

“Whether it’s the NFL or the Emmys, people desperately want a break from politics. It’s amazing to me at just how tone deaf Hollywood is,” Barron said.

“Most Republicans have stopped watching awards shows or know that even if they can stomach it, the White House and their core values will be attacked. I kept thinking last night, thank goodness for a few actors like Chris Pratt, who buck the trend and show a healthy respect and love for Christianity in acceptance speeches,” Fox Nation host Britt McHenry said. “Reverence for God is something to cherish and uphold, not ridicule.”

Jokes about religious Republicans weren’t the only jabs at Middle America.

Prior to the official event, actress Regina King spoke with E! about a cryptic Instagram post in which she asked to “stop making stupid people famous,” which many have interpreted as a dig at President Trump. The Red Carpet also featured actress Jennifer Lewis wearing a Nike sweatshirt “to applaud them for supporting Colin Kaepernick,” who has polarized the nation by starting the trend of kneeling during the national anthem prior to NFL games.

Jost discussed a handful of shows that were canceled and picked up by other networks before joking that Roseanne Barr’s show was “picked up by white nationalists.” He also implied that some Americans don’t think Nazis are bad and fantasized about President Obama upsetting Trump with a dig at the former reality TV star who is famously obsessed with ratings.

“The Obamas now even have their own production deal at Netflix,” Jost said. “My dream is that the only thing they produce is their own version of ‘The Apprentice.’ And it gets way higher ratings.”

Meanwhile, the Emmys decided to honor late Senator John McCain during its in memoriam. Nobody would complain about an American hero being remembered in front of a national audience, but Media Research Center contributing writer Karen Townsend questioned the motive behind the decision.

One can’t help but wonder if this was done as a subtle dig at President Trump. After all, it was only 10 years ago that all of Hollywood hated McCain when he ran for president against their beloved Obama,” she wrote.

Later in the show, award winner Ryan Murphy called America a “country that lets hatred grow unfettered and unchecked.” Anti-Trump comedian Samantha Bee – best known for vile comments about first daughter Ivanka Trump – joked that the news should “recast the lead.”

Read the rest of the story here.

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TDS can't save American Horror Story: Cult as its season opener takes a ratings dive

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Their TDS may help “alleviate their real world pain” of the election. Yet it appears to have alienated viewers. Hahahahahahahahahahaha.
From Deadline: Kicking off on the night of last year’s election and Donald Trump’s ascension to the Presidency, there was a lot of 2016 in the debut of American Horror Story: Cult. But not the numbers: with 3.93 million viewers and a 2.02 rating among adults 18-49 on September 5, the latest installment of the Ryan Murphy- and Brad Falchuk -created series premiered down significantly from last year’s season opener of American Horror Story: Roanoke.
In overall sets of eyeballs watching the politically drenched Cult, there was a 24% drop from the September 14, 2016 premiere of Roanoke. Among the key demo, the Tuesday installment topped cable and was the second highest-rated original on all of TV after NBC’s America’s Got Talent. Yet, even with that glory, Cult declined a hard 29% among 18-49s from the Wednesday Roanoke debut of 2016.
In fact, the Cult opener is the least-watched AHS debut since the 3.85 million who tuned in for the Asylum premiere on October 17, 2012. The least-watched AHS debut ever was the Murder House Season 1 premiere on October 5, 2011, which drew 3.18 million. However, while not apples to apples, the Cult opener did perform noticeably better than Roanoke’s closer of November 16 last year (2.45 million viewers, 1.3 rating).
Of course, FX has long said it doesn’t put a lot of stock in Live+Same Day numbers and instead waits for delayed viewing results. If last season is any indication, they should continue to be healthy for the AHS franchise now in its seventh season.
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TDS: American Horror Story: Cult to help "alleviate the real world pain" of our election


Another Hollyweird product I won’t be watching.
From IGN: Putting dangerous witches, sexy vampires and demonic nuns on hold, American Horror Story: Cult pulls back the curtain to explore the psychological aftermath from the 2016 presidential campaign.
Fear and anxiety take center stage here, pitting Sarah Paulson and Evan Peters against each other in a perverse tale of progress and paranoia. Season 7 puts the cult of personality directly in the spotlight, revealing that the real monster in this horror story is us. After viewing the first three episodes of Cult — titled “Election Night,” “Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark” and “Neighbors from Hell” — at an advance press screening, it’s safe to say that this move is a welcome change for the series.
Using the 2016 presidential campaign — election night, specifically — as a jumping off point, it’s clear from the very first moments of AHS: Cult that fear is the main component giving the new season life. Fear is currency; it’s the motivator and the separator. In Cult, it feeds the fire of rising cult figure, Kai Anderson (Peters), and pushes phobia-ridden Ally Mayfair Richards (Paulson) to her psychological breaking point.
 “I do think politics in the past year has become entertainment in a weird way in our country, and I think this plays into that a little bit,” Ryan Murphy stated during a Q&A session that followed the screening. “I think how the show begins on election night, pro or con … I think everybody can relate to that feeling of that evening. And that was the launch of the season.”
While there are many players in the “AHS: Cult” game — Alison Pill is Ally’s wife Ivy, Billie Lourd is Kai’s sister Winter, and Billy Eichner and Leslie Grossman are creepy neighbors, The Wiltons — it’s the dynamic between Kai and Ally that elevate the story in a way many fans may not expect. “It’s not about Trump, it’s not about Clinton,” Murphy continued. “It’s about somebody who has the wherewithal to put their finger up in the wind, see what’s happening and is using that to rise up and form power.”
For Kai Anderson, the election of Donald Trump is a watershed moment — leading the blue-haired maniac on a quest for power. According to Murphy, he has wanted to explore The Manson Family in an installment of AHS for quite some time. But as the writer/director/executive producer explained, this concept has since evolved: “The thing that we’re doing is we’re really examining all different sorts of cults — and there are many, many famous ones. Throughout the season, Evan Peters is, I think, playing six different cult leaders: Kai, Manson, David Koresh, Andy Warhol … Jim Jones is a big one. And we really examine, how do those people rise to power? And why did people follow them?
On the opposite side of the spectrum is Ally and Ivy — a Michigan couple living a comfortable existence steeped in success and a heaping helping of white privilege. That detail is played upon multiple times throughout Cult, showing that both sides of the Trump/Clinton argument are fair game. From a Rachel Maddow shoutout to some residual Jill Stein-rage, there are elements of satire throughout these first three episodes that help to alleviate the real world pain and anxiety people are still experiencing.
But Ally’s storyline of how her phobias are manifesting — particularly her coulrophobia, or fear of clowns — is an affective and terrifying way of keeping the horror in American Horror Story. In many ways, this season isn’t about an American horror story, but what Murphy considers to be our American horror story, showcasing both sides of the election’s aftermath in their extremes.
 “One of the things that I personally experienced after this election was a wild increase in anxiety,” Murphy explained. “We’re on the brink of nuclear war one week, and then, the next week we’re onto something else equally extreme.” Instead of burying his head in the sand, though, Murphy decided to use AHS as a means to deal with this new reality; to, in his words: “lean into the escalation of fear in our culture.”
Read the rest of the story here.
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The libtard butt hurt is still strong: Hollyweird “power players” whine about Trump

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These people take themselves way too seriously, as if they are relevant or something.
From Hollywood Reporter: It’s no secret that Hollywood’s not a fan of Donald Trump.
From outspoken condemnations such as Meryl Streep’s infamous Golden Globes speech — in which she criticized Trump’s remarks about a disabled reporter during the 2016 campaign — to director Judd Apatow’s consistent lambasting tweets, criticisms of the president are widespread among the leaders of the entertainment industry.
When asked how his presidency has affected their work and life, those who made the cut for the THR 100 — The Hollywood Reporter’s second annual ranking of the most powerful people in entertainment — had a variety of responses.
Some stayed mum, including Disney CEO Bob Iger (No. 1 on the THR 100), though he notably resigned from Trump’s Strategic and Policy Forum June 1 in the wake of Trump’s withdrawal from the Paris climate accord signed by nearly every other country. Fox TV Group chairman and co-CEO Dana Walden (No. 16) also skirted the subject of Trump. “I’m not talking about him right now,” she said. “Too depressing.”
Others were much more forthcoming, such as Feud and American Horror Story creator Ryan Murphy (No. 28). “At least the first hour of every day is dedicated to talking about the writers’ and staffers’ anxieties about the world, vis a vis the Trump administration, and then how are we going to put those anxieties into art,” said the four-time Emmy winner of the atmosphere in his writers room. “That’s new.”
FX Networks CEO John Landgraf (No. 24) didn’t pull any punches as he noted the stress of the last several months. “Trump has made me way more anxious, almost every day. It’s not about politics,” Landgraf said. “It’s about integrity. Judging by his behavior, he is completely amoral, does not believe in the democratic separation of powers enshrined in our Constitution, and recognizes no truth beyond himself — beyond what he needs to be the truth for his own emotional comfort in any given moment. It is scary to me that I have fellow citizens who still think he should be our president.
Some acknowledged the president’s role in revitalizing their work — and deepening its meaning. “Trump is good for the business of escapism,” said Get Out director Jordan Peele (No. 93), while Wonder Woman helmer Patty Jenkins (No. 94) shared a similar, yet slightly more earnest, sentiment: “I think he has put the messages and discussions that I want to have more in focus and pertinent than ever.”
Actor/producer Tyler Perry (No. 67) says Trump “reinvigorated my resolve to bring light and laughter and healing to this world,” while Selma and 13th director Ava DuVernay (No. 70) admitted the president has “devastated me in many ways, but each of those ways has made me more determined than before.” Oscar-winning producer Brian Grazer (No. 95) has been similarly influenced. “I make a lot of Horatio Alger underdog stories,” said the Imagine Entertainment partner. “So his presence in the White House affects how I do that.”
Nancy Dubuc (No. 44), president and CEO of A+E Networks, took a more measured view: “Our allegiance is to our audience,” she said, adding, “We’re careful to listen and represent diverse points of view and bring forward tough issues through the power of storytelling, when warranted.”
For recently appointed Sony Pictures and Entertainment CEO and chairman Tony Vinciquerra (No. 26), the controversy around Trump has had a positive impact. “Political discourse is at an all-time high everywhere I look,” he said. “Given voter apathy, as evidenced by L.A.’s recent 11 percent mayoral voter turnout, hopefully this political discourse will increase citizen engagement.”
Kevin Beggs (No. 91), chairman of Lionsgate TV Group, echoed Vinciquerra’s respect for open political discourse and public engagement. “What is unfolding in the White House is a powerful reminder that politics matter,” Beggs said. “Complacency is the enemy of democracy and it feels like, after decades of relative disinterest or disgust with the political process, people across the socioeconomic spectrum are paying attention. The surge in news readership and viewership is truly inspiring.”
A few THR 100 honorees had a lighter take on Trump, including NBC chairman Robert Greenblatt (No. 27). “We have one less reality show on our schedule,” the studio exec said, referencing the president’s not-so-distant past as Apprentice host. And Greenblatt wasn’t the only one to bring up the president’s history as a star of the small screen. “I finally watch reality TV full-time when I get home: the news,” said Supergirl and Arrow executive producer Greg Berlanti (No. 52).
UTA CEO and managing director Jeremy Zimmer (No. 33) admits that Trump has bolstered his reputation at home. Quipped the top agent, “He has made my kids think that I am highly moral and incredibly smart.”
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Ryan Murphy Reveals 'American Horror Story' Will Tackle 2016 Presidential Election


How original.
From Hollywood Reporter: Ryan Murphy is pulling inspiration straight from the 2016 presidential election for the next season of American Horror Story (AHS).
During an appearance on Watch What Happens Live With Andy Cohen, the prolific producer revealed that season seven of the FX anthology series will tackle the Nov. 8 election that saw Donald Trump defeat former first lady and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.
The next season “is going to be about the election that we just went through, so I think that will be interesting for a lot of people,” Murphy told Cohen while promoting his new FX anthology series, Feud.
When pressed for details from Cohen, particularly whether there will be a character based on President Trump, Murphy responded with a coy “Maybe.”
AHS was renewed for two more seasons in January. Series mainstays Sarah Paulson and Evan Peters have already been confirmed to return. Season seven, Murphy also revealed Wednesday, begins shooting in June.
AHS wouldn’t be the only series to address the most recent presidential election. The upcoming Good Wife spinoff, premiering Sunday, opens with Christine Baranski’s character watching President Trump’s inauguration. Black-ish discussed the surprising results of the election in a recent episode. South Park has also covered the election frequently.
As for series specifically depicting the president, Scandal famously featured a similar presidential candidate last season in Gregg Henry’s character. Meanwhile, Gary Cole played a businessman-turned-politician loosely inspired by Trump in a twice-delayed episode of Law & Order: SVU that has yet to air.
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