Tag Archives: Richard Dawkins

Atheist Richard Dawkins says we should get over our 'yuck' taboo against cannibalism

Wed, 07 Mar 2018 15:56:22 +0000

eowyn2

Add another voice to the growing pop culture “normalization” of cannibalism.

It’s Richard Dawkins, 76, the celebrated British evolutionary biologist and rabid atheist who says there’s nothing wrong about pedophilia and it’s our moral duty to kill the mentally retarded.

On March 3, 2018, referring to a news article in the Independent on lab-grown meat being on restaurant menus by the end of this year, Dawkins asks in a tweet if human meat can be grown, and calls the “taboo” against cannibalism a knee-jerk “yuck reaction” of a rigid moral absolutism:

“Tissue culture ‘clean meat’ already in 2018? I’ve long been looking forward to this. What if human meat is grown? Could we overcome our taboo against cannibalism? An interesting test case for consequentialist morality versus ‘yuck reaction’ absolutism.”

Note: Consequentialism is a school of thought that says the morality of an action depends on the consequences it creates. A moral action is one that produces a positive or beneficial outcome; an immoral action is one that produces a negative outcome. Of course, what “positive” and “negative” mean are undefined. In other words, consequentialist morality is the end justifies the means — what is moral is what benefits me, aka moral relativism.

Richard Dawkins decries our taboo against cannibalism as an unthinking, emotional (“yuck reaction”) moral absolutism, as opposed to the end-justifies-the-means consequentialist morality he approves. What escapes me is the positive or beneficial end of cannibalism. Dawkins, in his senile-demented and demon-possessed mind, must think kuru to be the “positive” end that justifies cannibalism.

Note: Kuru — spongiform encephalopathy or human mad cow disease — is an incurable neurodegenerative disease transmitted via cannibalism.

Here’s a thought: Dawkins’ advocacy of cannibalism itself may be a result and symptom of kuru.

In his book, The God Delusion, Dawkins wrote:

“It seems to me to require quite a low self-regard to think that, should belief in God suddenly vanish from the world, we would all become callous and selfish hedonists, with no kindness, no charity, no generosity, nothing that would deserve the name of goodness.”

By his advocacy for pedophilia, killing the mentally retarded, and now pointless cannibalism, Dawkins precisely demonstrates the very “callous and selfish hedonists, with no kindness, no charity, no generosity, nothing that would deserve the name of goodness” of a world banished of the divinity.

Richard Dawkins is an exemplar of what Fyodor Dostoyevsky so presciently observed 138 years ago in The Brothers Karamazov:

“In a world without God, everything is permitted.”

See also:

H/t LifeNews and FOTM reader Big Lug.

~Eowyn

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Global Atheist Convention cancelled for lack of interest


A Global Atheist Convention was supposed to be held next February in Melbourne, Australia, but it’s been cancelled due to lack of interest.
In a commentary for The Sydney Morning Herald, November 8, 2017, Dr.  Michael Jensen, rector of St Mark’s Anglican Church in Darling Point, Australia, writes:

“Reason to Hope”, the third Global Atheist Convention scheduled for Melbourne in February 2018, has been cancelled because of “lack of interest” (according to my sources).

The conference was scheduled to be headlined by two famous atheists: novelist Salmon Rushdie, 70, and English evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins, 76.

Richard Dawkins


Aside from his epistemological arrogance in claiming to know a negative — that God doesn’t exist — Dawkins is also known for saying there’s nothing wrong with pedophilia and that it’s our moral duty to kill the mentally retarded.
See also:

~Eowyn

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Famous atheist Richard Dawkins says it's our moral duty to kill the mentally retarded

Thu, 21 Aug 2014 13:47:30 +0000

eowyn2

“In a world without God, everything is permitted.”
-Fyodor Dostoyevsky, The Brothers Karamazov

In addition to exterminating millions of Jews, Nazi Germany also killed gypsies (Romani), Christians (Edith Stein and Maximilian Kolbe are examples), the physically handicapped, and the mentally retarded, including those with Down Syndrome.

Now a famous atheist, 73-year-old British evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins, says it would be “immoral” not to abort a baby with Down Syndrome, which is another way of saying it is our moral duty to kill those with Down Syndrome.

Richard Dawkins, 73

Richard Dawkins, 73

Dustin Siggins reports for LifeSiteNews that in an exchange on Twitter on August 20, 2014, Dawkins wrote that choosing not to abort a child with Down Syndrome would be “uncivilized” and “immoral.”

The conversation began when Dawkins tweeted that “Ireland is a civilised country except in this 1 area.” The area was abortion, which until last year was illegal in all cases in Ireland.

A Twitter user named Aidan McCourt asked Dawkins if “994 human beings with Down’s Syndrome [having been] deliberately killed before birth in England and Wales in 2012” was “civilised.”

Dawkins replied: “Yes, it is very civilised. These are fetuses, diagnosed before they have human feelings.”

Dawkins tweet

Later, Dawkins said that “the question is not ‘is it ‘human’?’ but ‘can it SUFFER?’”

In perhaps the most shocking moment, one Twitter user wrote that s/he “honestly [doesn’t] know what I would do if I were pregnant with a kid with Down Syndrome. Real ethical dilemma.”

Dawkins advised the writer to “abort it and try again. It would be immoral to bring it into the world if you have the choice.”

According to Dawkins, the issue of who should be born comes down to a calculation based upon possible suffering. “Yes. Suffering should be avoided. [The abortion] cause[s] no suffering. Reduce suffering wherever you can.”

It is estimated that in many Western countries the abortion rate of children diagnosed in utero with Down syndrome is 90%, or even higher. The development of new and more accurate tests for the condition has raised concerns among Down syndrome advocates that that number could rise even higher.

Although it is widely believed that people with Down syndrome are doomed to a life of suffering, in one large survey 99% of respondents with Down syndrome said they were “happy.” At the same time, 99% of parents said they loved their child with Down syndrome, and 97% said they were proud of them.

Only 4% of parents who responded said they regretted having their child.

Scientist though he is, Dawkins is simply wrong about fetuses babies in the womb not feeling pain. It is now well-established that 20 weeks into a pregnancy, unborn children can feel pain. Likewise, unborn children have emotional reactions to external stimuli — such as a mother’s stress levels — months before being born.

In other words, the unborn baby DOES suffer when he or she is aborted.

Finally, if “suffering” — as conjectured and determined not by the sufferer but by “scientists” like Dawkins — is the criterion for killing someone, then we might as well bring back Hitler and the Nazis.

Didn’t you know that the Nazis fervently believed that, in exterminating millions of human beings, they were doing good by eliminating the sub-human (Untermensch) so as to prevent them for polluting the human gene pool?

See also “Atheist Richard Dawkins says nothing wrong with pedophilia.”

~Eowyn

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Creation: So who created God?

Ring galaxyThe Ring Galaxy, with a span of 100,000 light years, is 600 million light years away from Earth. Visible in the gap (at about one o’clock) is yet another ring galaxy that likely lies even farther in the distance. [NASA]

Dr. Hugh Ross is a Christian physicist and astronomer who writes books and a terrific blog, Reasons to Believe, showing how science and Christianity can be very compatible. More than that, Dr. Ross uses science to demonstrate the truths of our Christian faith.

In his Summa Theologica, St. Thomas Aquinas (1225-1274) famously reasoned for the existence of God by pointing to “the chains of effecting causes that exist in the world. Things here are produced by their causes; these causes in turn were produced by their causes, and so on. Ultimately, there must be a first cause….”

In his post of April 7, 2014, Dr. Ross answers a very good question from a non-believer on who/what created that first cause. Here’s the question:

Hello,

Let me start by saying I’m not actually a believer at this moment. When listening to the lectures, I hear a lot of talk about the complexity of things being a big proponent for creation or design because somebody created it. But at some point in the paradigm you’re at least admitting that, somewhere, something just existed that was at least as complex as, or more complex than, us….If we couldn’t have just existed, how could you say God just existed without something creating him. I’d like to hear your answer on that.

— Submitted by an attendee of an RTB event in San Antonio, TX

Dr. Ross gave a brilliant answer, pointing out that cause-and-effect can only happen in our Universe of space and time.

For if we say that X caused Y, X must have happened some time before Y.

But the Creator of the Universe cannot Himself be contained in that Universe. That means the Creator is outside our Universe of space and time, which in turn means that the Creator, the First Cause, is outside of time and, therefore, has no cause.

As St. Thomas Aquinas put it:

Where there is motion, there is a mover, and ultimately a first mover, itself unmoved. This is God.Ultimately, there must be a first cause which is itself uncaused. This is God.

Here is Dr. Ross’s answer:

Dear not-yet-a-believer,

Your question is one of the most important any human being could ask—and one that most Christians are ill prepared to answer.

As I understand your query, if explaining the natural realm’s ability to support life, especially human life, requires extreme levels of complexity and design, then would not the cause of all this complexity and design need a cause that is even greater than Him? As Richard Dawkins puts it, the problem with Christianity is accounting for who “designed the Designer?”1

The question of who created God was the heart of my debate with Lewis Wolpert at Imperial College in London. (You can listen to the debate here). In a nutshell, I explained that, today, physicists across the philosophical spectrum acknowledge that the space-time theorems are unassailable. If the universe contains mass and if general relativity reliably describes the movements of bodies in the universe, the theorems are valid. Those theorems establish that space and time had a beginning at the origin of the universe. They imply that the causal agent of the universe is not subject to space and time—thus, that agent can create space-time dimensions at will.

Of course, any entity—such as the universe and everything subject to the laws and dimensions of the universe—that is constrained to a single dimension of time, where time cannot be stopped or reversed, must have a beginning. Ultimately, such entities must be traceable back to a creation event. However, an entity not constrained by time need not have been created.

The Bible declares in multiple passages that God created time (e.g., John 1:3; Colossians 1:16–17). Psalm 90 adds that God can arbitrarily compress or expand time as we know it. In my book Beyond the Cosmos (3rd edition), I include diagrams illustrating that this compression and expansion of time is only possible for beings with access to the equivalent of at least two dimensions of time. Scripture also declares that God has no beginning, no ending, and is not created (e.g., Psalm 90:2; Hebrews 7:3). These declarations could be true only of a Being who created time, rather than one who is subject to time.

Philosophers responding to Dawkins have pointed out that he made a category error. God is in a different category than the universe or humans in that He is not subject to the physical laws of the universe or to its space-time dimensionality.

For a more thorough answer to this question, I suggest reading Beyond the Cosmos. The book includes a description of scientific evidence for the existence of nine dimensions of space and for a Being who brought into existence ten space-time dimensions.

~Eowyn

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