Tag Archives: Rachel Dolezal

Transracial Florida man born white claims he is actually Filipino

adam wheeler

Filipino Ja Du…pursuing his happiness in his own way

Move over Rachel Dolezal, there’s a new “transracial” in town!

From Daily Mail: A Florida man who was born white is now claiming that he is actually ‘transracial’ and Filipino.

Adam Wheeler, who now goes as Ja Du, considers himself to be from the Philippines and drives around in a Tuk Tuk in Tampa – a vehicle used for public transit in the country.

‘Whenever I’m around the music, around the food, I feel like I’m in my own skin,’ he said to WTSP. I’d watch the history channel sometimes for hours you know whenever it came to that and you know nothing else intrigued me more but things about Filipino culture.’

‘Ja Du’ has embraced most aspects of the adopted culture that he is attempting to adopt as his own. ‘My family knows about my transsexuality but they don’t know anything about this,’ said Ja Du who did not elaborate.

Ja Du has even created a Facebook page and community for other people who believe that they are not the race that they have lived with.

When pressed about cultural appropriation, or the adopting of other cultures and claiming them as their own, he replied: ‘I believe people will [take advantage] just like other people have taken advantage of their identity to get their way, but the difference between me and them is that I don’t want that. I think that we all have the freedoms to pursue happiness in our own ways.’

Psychologist Dr. Stacey Scheckner wants to make sure that the intention behind the choice to be a different race is a genuine one but she feels it’s okay if it doesn’t bring harm.

‘If someone feels that they feel at home with a certain religion, a certain race, a certain culture, I think that if that’s who they really feel inside life is about finding out who you are. The more knowledge you have of yourself, the happier you can be,’ she said. ‘And, as long as it’s not hurting yourself or anyone else, I don’t see a problem with that.’

Rachel Dolezal was an infamous case in the transracial discussion as of late. She was the former president of the Spokane, Washington, chapter of NAACP but when it was revealed that she was a white woman, she was forced to step down.

She had been altering her hair and darkening her skin with makeup to present herself as a blacker woman.

DCG

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Rachel Dolezal speaks out: ‘I am not a fraud’

rachel dolezal

Rachel Dolezal: Her label is too complicated…

I have a label for her: delusional.

From MyNorthwest.com: Nearly two years after the world discovered that the head of Spokane’s NAACP was not a black woman, but a white woman passing as African-American, Rachel Dolezal maintains she is not a fraud.

“I have an authentic identity,” Dolezal told KIRO Radio’s Jason and Burns Show. “Even though I was born to white parents, I have an authentic cultural and philosophical, political identity, and that is described as ‘black’ within the terms we have in our society right now.”

“If there was a more complex label allowed, I would describe myself as trans black … born into a white category and identifying as black, maybe even Pan-African, pro black, bisexual, activist, artist, other,” she said. “I really am a human being. I am a mom. I am a woman. The last thing that describes or defines me is a fraud.”

That’s a sentiment delivered in Dolezal’s recently-released book, “In Full Color: Finding My Place in a Black and White World.” What readers will likely find is that there is more to the story behind Dolezal than reported. For example, Gerald Hankerson, NAACP president of the Alaska Oregon Washington state area is quoted on the back cover:

The storm of vitriol Rachel received in the national spotlight was as cruel as it was undeserved. Her deep compassion for others shines through every chapter of her life and has clearly motivated her truly outstanding advocacy work.

Albert Wilkerson Jr., the man who Dolezal describes as her non-biological father, wrote the forward. He describes how her “vibe felt black” and how he was unaware of Dolezal’s white parents, but it didn’t matter to him. He cared more about her social justice work.

But not everyone is as accepting as Hankerson and Wilkerson, as Jason and Burns found out when they interviewed Dolezal, pressing her on issues of fraud and comparing trans-racial experiences to that of the transgender community.

Rachel Dolezal: Early life

Dolezal briefed Jason and Burns on her life story, starting when she was very young and she did not feel white. By the time she was 8 years old, she learned to repress her non-white feelings.

“I felt like I had been born wrong,” she said. “I had something wrong with me and I had to atone for that whether it was in the religious sphere I was in; sometimes it was labeled as being demon possessed, or just even dancing to music was not OK as a girl. I really repressed my entire childhood. When I got to college I was still, in many ways, repressed and heavily socially conditioned and brainwashed into believing race was biological.

Things began to change when she attended college in Mississippi, she said. She thinks it was then that many people began to feel as if she was light-skinned, but African American.

“The way that I moved in the very racially polarized Mississippi culture, people were, ‘Well, she can’t be white if she is comfortable in this environment,’ or is doing with x, y, z; fighting for civil rights,” Dolezal said. “…so people started assuming that I was black. And I let that assumption be and carry. But I didn’t assert or feel personal agency to name my identity until after my divorce.”

Her identity was put on hold again, Dolezal explained, when she was married after college. Her husband had no interest in black culture. Her religious upbringing kicked in and she submitted to her husband. But at 26, she was divorced. She took on four jobs, raised her kids, started therapy to deal with sexual and childhood abuses, and the PTSD it left behind. She continued on as a black woman and met her non-biological father. And eventually she became involved in the Spokane NAACP.

Some of her community has faded away, and others close to her have stuck around through the hard times. “When this all happened they had whatever reaction they felt,” Dolezal recalled. “Some people were bothered and felt a sense of betrayal that I hadn’t disclosed everything to them. Those relationships I lost. Other people were not bothered by it … Those relationships with people who knew me better than the surface, who knew me more than a casual relationship, they lasted.”

And since the fallout in 2015, Dolezal has found support in other corners of the world. People have reached out to her.

“In the public eye, I think I am on a little bit of an island, but I hear from people every day who feel the way I feel; in the same direction, in the opposite direction across the color line,” she said. “An Asian man who feels white and has done surgery to his eyes to transition; a white man who feels Mexican and has done surgery to his nose and has altered his appearance and is living in Mexico; a black woman who feels white and has altered her appearance. I hear from people all the time who have a sense of plural identity, but are handling it in a very private way … I think people are scared. They don’t want to be mocked and shamed or ridiculed into isolation or be treated the way I have been treated.”

“I don’t see myself as a victim,” Dolezal said. “I do feel like I’m a survivor … I’ve survived a number of things throughout life and I’m doing my best to make it through another round of challenges right now.”

DCG

Rachel Dolezal, white woman who identifies as black, now jobless, may soon be homeless

Rachel Dolezal

Girlfriend needs a dose of reality. Or is “reality” a “social construct” as well?

From Fox News: Rachel Dolezal, the infamous white woman who for years passed herself off as African American and rose to become head of an NAACP branch, is now jobless, on food stamps and expects to soon be homeless.

A defiant Dolezal, 39, recounted her current plight to The Guardian. Dolezal said she’s only been offered jobs in reality television and porno flicks. A friend helped her come up with the money for February’s rent and she doesn’t know how she’s going to pay for March.

And she still says she’s not white.

“I do think a more complex label would be helpful, but we don’t really have that vocabulary,” Dolezal told The Guardian. “I feel like the idea of being trans-black would be much more accurate than ‘I’m white.’ Because, you know, I’m not white . . . Calling myself black feels more accurate than saying I’m white.”

Dolezal was exposed in June 2015 when a local television crew asked her the simple question: “Are you African American?”

Pictures of a younger, white-skinned and blonde-haired Dolezal soon surfaced and her story exploded. The formerly successful leader of the Spokane NAACP chapter and a university professor, Dolezal – who once sued historically-black Howard University for racial discrimination, because she was white – now says she’s been turned down for 100 jobs and her memoir was rejected by 30 publishers before finding a taker.

She’s also apparently begun ruffling feathers in the transgender community by claiming that race, like gender, is fluid. “It’s more so,” Dolezal told The Guardian. “Because it wasn’t even biological to begin with. It was always a social construct.”

Dolezal said she’s never considered identifying as white again.

“I feel that I was born with the essential essence of who I am, whether it matches my anatomy and complexion or not,” Dolezal said. “I’ve never questioned being a girl or a woman, for example, but whiteness has always felt foreign to me, for as long as I can remember. I didn’t choose to feel this way or be this way, I just am. What other choice is there than to be exactly who we are?”

DCG

Pre-order Rachel Dolezal’s book!

rachel-dolezal-book

Available in March 2017! Only $14.49 on Kindle! Only $15.44 for hardcover!

HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!

From Amazon:

A lot of people think they know what Rachel Doležal is. Race faker. Liar. Opportunist. Crazy bitch.

But they don’t get to decide who Rachel Doležal is. What determines your race? Is it your DNA? The community in which you were raised? The way others see you, or the way you see yourself?

On June 11, 2015, the media “outed” Rachel Doležal as a white woman who had knowingly been “passing” as black. When asked if she were African American during an interview about the hate crimes directed at her and her family, she hesitated before ending the interview and walking away. Some interpreted her reluctance to respond and hasty departure as dishonesty, while others assumed she lacked a reasonable explanation for the almost unprecedented way she identified herself. With In Full Color, Rachael Doležal describes the path that led her from being a child of white evangelical parents to an NAACP chapter president and respected educator and activist who identified as black. Along the way, she’ll discuss the deep emotional bond she formed with her four adopted black siblings, the sense of belonging she felt while living in black communities in Jackson, Mississippi and Washington, D.C., and the experiences she’s had while living as a black woman.

Her story is nuanced and complex, and in the process of telling it, she forces us to consider race in an entirely new light—not as a biological imperative, but as a function of the experiences we have, the culture we embrace, and, ultimately, the identity we choose.

Go to the link below to order this sure-to-be best seller:

https://www.amazon.com/Full-Color-Finding-Place-Black/dp/194464816X/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1483069242&sr=1-1&keywords=black+and+white+world+dolezal

DCG

U.S. white pre-school kids think they can grow up to be blacks

America has gone mad.

Seriously.

When transgenders — a biological imposssibility no matter how much sex-change genital mutilation surgery you get — became all the rage, we on Fellowship of the Minds joked that before you know it, there’d be transraces. The latter term refers to people who imagine themselves to be a different race than the one their heredity and DNA say they are.

Then came Rachel Dolezal — the white president of Washington’s NAACP who was outed as a pretend black, but to this day still insists she is a negro, although her biological parents and childhood pictures of her say otherwise.

Rachel DolezalNow comes news that her lunacy is spreading.

CBS Detroit reports, May 19, 2016:

Can a person’s race change over time? No — but preschoolers seem to think so.

According to a University of Michigan study, white preschoolers often believe a person’s race can change over time, and the youngsters even think they can can grow up to become black adults.

Steven Roberts, a U-M doctoral student and the study’s lead author, said that although children may be aware of races other than their own, they don’t have a strong understanding of what race is — at least not to the degree of adults.

Roberts and colleague Susan Gelman, U-M professor of psychology and linguistics, examined the extent that children believed race was stable; that is, whether a black child would grow up to be a black adult.

The experiment included 74 children and 28 adults. Children were recruited in the Midwest at museums, and adults were recruited online.The data were collected between 2014 and 2015.

Researchers showed participants pictures of children who were happy or angry and black or white, and asked them to indicate which of two adults each child would grow up to be. One adult matched the child in emotion (but not race) and the other matched the child in race (but not emotion).

Participants could have chosen a same-emotion but different race match, or a same-race but different emotion match.

White adults, white 9- to 10-year-olds and racial minority 5- to 6-year-olds selected the same-race matches, which meant they believed, for instance, that a white child would grow up to be a white adult.

But white 5- to 6-year-olds showed a different pattern. They selected the same-emotion and same-race matches at equal rates, which meant they were not committed to the belief that race was stable.

“These data suggest that beliefs about racial stability vary by age and race, and that at an early age, children do not have strong beliefs about race. They don’t even believe that race is stable,” Roberts said in a statement. “Because of this, white 5- to 6-year-olds may be less likely to use race as a way to discriminate against other children when selecting who to play with, for example.”

One possible reason underlying these differences could be experience. Roberts says black children might learn about racial differences at younger ages because of their exposure to more racial diversity, whereas their white peers might not get those experiences until they attend grade school.

This research was funded by a Ford Foundation Predoctoral Fellowship, a National Science Foundation Predoctoral Fellowship, and a grant from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. The findings appear in Developmental Psychology.

God help us!

See also “Transgender & transrace are so yesterday. Here’s transspecies!

~Eowyn

Race imposter Rachel Dolezal continues to insist she’s black

When asked if she’s faking her skin color, Dolezal admits to only having used bronzer. However, sources told TMZ that Dolezal was a loyal customer at Palm Beach Tan in Spokane, Washington. TMZ:

“We’re told she was a fan of Mystic Tan … a brand of spray tan. We’re told Rachel was a frequent customer. Palm Beach Tan offers light, medium and dark shades. Our sources wouldn’t tell us which Rachel chose, but a spray tan expert tells us Rachel’s a medium girl. The cost … a reasonable $30 a dip. There are also packages of $60 a month for unlimited visits.”

Dolezal’s insanity clearly has been passed on to her 13-year-old son, who says (beg. at 4:00 mark) instead of calling his mother a liar, she should be celebrated as a hero.

H/t FOTM’s maziel

Rachel Dolezal

See also “Busted! President of Washington NAACP is white.”

~Éowyn

“I wanted to be a special, different White person”

The good white professor...

The good white professor…

Huffington Post: Rachel Dolezal is a fascinating case study in White racial identity development. She is stuck in the immersion/emersion stage, in which White people, having learned extensively about the realities of racism, and the ugly history of White supremacy in the U.S., “immerse” themselves in trying to figure out how to be White in our society, and “emerge” with a new relationship to Whiteness. Only in the case of Dolezal, her way of dealing with the pain of the reality of racism, was to deny her own Whiteness and to become Black.

She is an extreme example of a common phenomenon. The “immersion” stage is typified by White people taking more responsibility for racism and privilege and often experiencing high levels of anger and embarrassment for racism and privilege, which they sometimes direct towards other Whites. They sometimes try to immerse themselves in communities of color, as Dolezal did. She’s not alone.

I definitely experienced this. There was a time in my 20s when everything I learned about the history of racism made me hate myself, my Whiteness, my ancestors… and my descendants. I remember deciding that I couldn’t have biological children because I didn’t want to propagate my privilege biologically.

If I was going to pass on my privilege, I wanted to pass it on to someone who doesn’t have racial privilege; so I planned to adopt. I disliked my Whiteness, but I disliked the Whiteness of other White people more. I felt like the way to really end racism was to feel guilty for it, and to make other White people feel guilty for it too. And then, like Dolezal, I wanted to take on Africanness. Living in South Africa during my junior year abroad, I lived with a Black family, wore my hair in head wraps, shaved my head. I didn’t want to be White, but if I had to be, I wanted to be White in a way that was different from other White people I knew. I wanted to be a special, different White person. The one and only. How very White of me…

white racist

Beverly Daniel Tatum has written that White people don’t choose to identify as White because the categories to choose from are loaded from the start. Traditionally, one can identify as a colorblind White person, a racist White person or an ignorant White person: those are the three ways White people get talked about as White. If those are the options, who would choose to identify as White? And so White people identify as “normal” and “Irish” and “just American” and do not self-identify racially. And that leaves us with a society in which only people of color have a race, where only people of color seem to be responsible for racialized problems. It makes it hard for all of us to know and tell our racial stories — because White people think we don’t have any. And it makes it hard for us to own our history, because we don’t see it as ours.

Many White people also feel like we don’t have culture, and this isn’t a coincidence. Throughout the 20th century, countless immigrant groups abandoned the artifacts of cultures that racialized them as immigrants (language, religion, food, styles of speaking, gesticulations, family structures, traditions, etc.) in order to become White. And this was not just a matter of fitting in; it was about accessing rights that were reserved for White people: citizenship, land ownership, police protection, legal rights, etc.

The more one could cast off the markers of otherness, the more likely it was that one could become White. And so while the desire to become White is really the opposite of what Rachel Dolezal had, the process of becoming White that her ancestors undoubtedly went through in the great American star-off machine, may be connected to her desire to un-become White, to lose that feeling of being cultureless, of being part of an unidentified group, and to leave behind that identity that has no positive way to be. And lots of White people — myself included — do this in thousands of tiny ways as we appropriate the cultures of others (from Africa, India, Compton, Guatemala, Harlem, Mexico…) to fill in the blanks in our own.

Daniel Tatum said we need to change this. We need to give White people new ways to identify as White. Because at the end of the day, we need White people to see that we are White. When we recognize and own our Whiteness, we can account for our own portion, our one 1/billionth of responsibility for what White people have done throughout history. We can work with other White people to begin to challenge bias, ignorance and colorblindness. We can use our privilege to confront the sources of that unfair favoring.

I was lucky. The Black family I embedded myself in during my “Rachel Dolezal phase” insisted on my inherent goodness, and that of my family and even — I thought this was a stretch — of my ancestors. They helped me focus on my capacity to make change as a White person. They appreciated my desire to be Black, they teased me, they let me know in no uncertain terms that I would never be Black. I read James Baldwin, Toni Morrison, Steve Biko. I swore off White authors. But the Black authors I read saw the immersion stage coming, and they reminded me that Black people don’t need White people to help them pursue liberation, that the job of White people lies with teaching other White people, seeing ourselves clearly, owning our role in oppression.

I’m not sure what happened with Rachel Dolezal. Maybe it was mental illness. Maybe it was a desire to connect to her adopted brothers. Maybe she felt safer and more loved in Black communities. Maybe it felt good to distance herself from the overwhelming oppressiveness of Whiteness — her own and that of her country and of her ancestors. But the lesson for me is remembering how deep the pain is, the pain of realizing I’m White, and that I and my ancestors are responsible for the incredible racialized mess we find ourselves in today. The pain of facing that honestly is blinding. It’s not worse than being on the receiving end of that oppression.

The professor suffers pain from realizing she's white.

The professor suffers pain from realizing she’s white.

Being White — even with the feeling of culturelessness and responsibility for racism — is nothing compared to not being White. But being White — and facing the truth of what that means historically and systemically — can drive you to do the weird and unthinkable that we see in Dolezal today.

It seems like a good warning. Rachel Dolezal’s actions are a potential pitfall for any White people on the journey towards recognizing the truth of what it means to be White and accepting responsibility for it. But we cannot not be White. And we cannot undo what Whiteness has done. We can only start from where we are and who we are.

DCG