Tag Archives: preppy men’s clothes

Preppy menswear (polo shirts, khaki pants) is racist

Preppy menswear “has its roots in the Ivy League style of dress,” which started around 1912 and became established in the late 1950s. (Wikipedia)
According to WikiHow:

Want to dress in a clean-cut, polished and preppy fashion? All you have to do is cultivate a classic, simple look…. The easiest way to look preppy is to dress in simple, preppy colors like navy, white, and crimson…. Pick items that are cut somewhat conservatively. Avoid revealing clothing…. Preppy outfits are relatively simple in nature. They usually come down to a few classic clothing items that never really go out of style. If you want to look preppy, stock up on some basic essentials for your wardrobe . . . Polo shirts . . . oxford shirts . . . khaki pants . . . A patterned or solid colored button down shirt

If you’re a man who wears polo or button-down shirts, or khaki pants, cargo shorts or neat jeans, you should know that you’re a despicable neo-Nazi!
That’s the latest from the lunatic Left, specifically a staff writer and fashion critic of The Washington Post.

Robin Givhan, “a staff writer and the Washington Post fashion critic, covering fashion as a business, as a cultural institution and as pure pleasure,” writes for The Washington Post, August 22, 2017:

“Fashion has been weaponized. And the fashion industry has been all but silent….
[F]ashion has become a stealth weapon for white nationalists. Neo-Nazis have bought into fashion’s ability to camouflage, distract, embolden, reassure, flatter and, quite simply, lie.
In the multitude of images from Charlottesville, the race-baiting protesters are decked out in white polo shirts and khakis. Others are wearing neat jeans, button-down shirts, cargo shorts. They are wearing jeans and striped pullovers that look like they could have come from the sale rack at a local Gap.

Some of the attire is brand specific: Fred Perry golf shirts, for instance. That company, along with New Balance earlier in the year, issued a statement denouncing the white nationalists who’d declared a fondness for their products.

But the relevance of fashion in the conversation about racial hatred goes well beyond any particular brand. For an observer cognizant of the internal symbols and visual language of white nationalists, there was a lot to read: neo-Nazi, Proud Boy, skinhead, alt-right. But for the uninitiated, the style of dress was unremarkable. This wasn’t a crowd filled with white robes and hoods….

White nationalists are moving through communities cloaked in the most mundane, banal kind of fashion. Clothes that do not inspire a double-take. Clothes that are acceptable and appropriate. Clothes that make them look like they belong. And the fashion industry has yet to tell them that they do not.”


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~Eowyn

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