Tag Archives: Portland’s homeless crisis

Whoops: Portland city officials over-estimate (by 5 times) the number of new homes they expected an infill project to create

Wonder how long it will take Portland bureaucrats to create affordable homes to solve their homeless crisis with this kind of “planning?”

From Oregon Live: Portland planners publicly overstated by five times the number of new homes they expect a controversial infill plan could create over the next two decades.

City officials boasted that their plan projects “the addition of 24,000 units in triplexes or fourplexes” by the year 2035.

But the city’s own forecasts paint a much different picture.

Planners expect a net of fewer than 4,000 new units to be built in residential neighborhoods citywide under their infill plan, according to numbers obtained by The Oregonian/OregonLive and not previously disclosed by the city.

What’s more, the plan isn’t expected to deliver those new homes to the inner eastside neighborhoods as planners have stated, an analysis of those numbers shows. Instead, it would disproportionately steer a majority of new units to poorer neighborhoods east of 82nd Avenue, where the risk of displacing residents is high.

It’s not clear which number might ultimately prove more accurate.

But planners have trumpeted the higher figure of new homes when they talk about ways to offer more housing options to keep prices affordable while using the lower figure to analyze specific neighborhood impacts and the potential that vulnerable residents could get pushed out to make way for the new homes.

The infill proposal could become official city policy by this summer. The city’s volunteer Planning and Sustainability Commission is expected to vote on the proposal Tuesday before referring it to the City Council for final action.

While forecasting home construction is an inexact science, city officials acknowledge they haven’t adequately communicated their infill projections. Nothing in their work was intended to be misleading, they say.

“We need to be more articulate,” said Donnie Oliveira, a spokesman for Portland’s Bureau of Planning and Sustainability.

Planners say their overarching objective isn’t to hit a quota for new infill but rather to create more choices about the types of homes available in residential neighborhoods. Changing the zoning code is the only way to add new housing options, they say, even if it takes several decades for developers to build significantly more infill units.

“It’s a major step in removing the regulatory barriers, but not the market barriers,” said Morgan Tracy, a lead planner on the project.

Read the whole story here.

DCG

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How much does it cost for a 100-bed homeless shelter tent in Portland? Take a wild guess…

One big expensive tent/Photo from Harbor of Hope

Doesn’t matter as there are always taxpayer funds to cover the costs.

FYI: From the brief search I was able to do about this private developer, Homer Williams, it looks like he’s got a questionable history with his developments.

As reported by Oregon Live: Despite promises of a private-sector solution to homelessness, the city-county Joint Office of Homeless Services has agreed to pitch in at least $1 million to make sure a new shelter actually opens.

The 100-bed shelter, built inside a tent-like structure in Northwest Portland at the base of the Broadway Bridge, was billed as the business community’s answer to local government’s inability to get people off the street.

Developer Homer Williams announced the plan with a starting $1.5 million contribution from Columbia Sportswear CEO Tim Boyle. The project quickly began to run behind schedule and over budget.

The “navigation center” model of shelter is a new one for Portland. Williams and former Portland Development Commission director Don Mazziotti wanted to replicate what they saw in San Francisco and other cities that have used this model that combines traditional shelter space with intensive help from service providers to help the people who stay at the shelter get into permanent housing as quickly as possible. It will also have laundry facilities, showers and other amenities.

Through Harbor of Hope, Williams and Mazziotti’s nonprofit, project officials estimated that it would cost $3.5 million to get the shelter built and running for the first year. By December, they began to worry that the $3.5 million would only cover construction.

But warning signs showed up as early as last summer.

Harbor of Hope broke ground in April on land donated by Portland’s urban renewal agency, which will retain ownership. The city waived permit fees, as well.

The cost to clean up the lead, arsenic, fossil fuels and other contaminants on the site ended up higher than expected. Officials reported at the end of July that environmental cleanup was earmarked as $100,000 in the budget. But Harbor of Hope had already spent $600,000 on it.

Harbor of Hope leaders also found that construction costs were going to be more expensive than predicted. By the time the original $3.5 million was raised, the project cost had doubled.

While the mayor’s office had said the city had no plans to finance a shelter that wasn’t feasible, city and county officials have wanted more shelter beds in the Old Town Chinatown area for years. They first saw an empty warehouse on Hoyt Street as an option, but that location would have taken up to $10 million to make usable.

So while Williams and others vowed that Harbor of Hope would not require any taxpayer money, officials saw this shelter as a cheaper option than building or renovating their own.

The Joint Office of Homeless Services agreed to contribute the first year’s operating budget, which will pay for staff, programming and day-to-day needs at the shelter.

“Our elected leaders and service providers don’t get enough credit for their success in adding hundreds of shelter beds across our community,” Williams said in a statement. “It’s difficult and expensive to find and invest in good sites, close to the right services.”

Williams has pitched other ideas in the past that have largely gone nowhere. He gained some traction under former Mayor Charlie Hales with an idea to turn marine Terminal 1 into a homeless shelter campus but lost city council support when it came to who would run the shelter.

He has also proposed a land trade to build workforce housing in industrial-zoned areas and asked Multnomah County to continue to pay the upkeep costs of Wapato Jail instead of selling it immediately so that Harbor of Hope could evaluate whether the nonprofit could make an offer on the building.

But on Harbor of Hope’s 2017 tax forms, the organization was nearly $110,000 in the red, due to a more than $100,000 loan that covered expenses while Williams and others raised little more than $8,000. The year before Harbor of Hope reported nearly $130,000 raised — most of it gone by the end of the year due to travel, salary for Mazziotti and payments to contractors.

Read the whole story here.

DCG

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Liberal utopia of California: Homeless crisis declared in state’s capital

Many progressive-run west coast liberal cities and counties have a homeless crisis: San Francisco, Seattle, San Diego, Portland, San Jose, Los Angeles County and King County. See one of the many posts I’ve done about this here:

You can now add the city of Sacramento to that list as well.

From Sacramento Bee: The Sacramento City Council unlocked millions in state homelessness funding Thursday by voting unanimously to declare an emergency shelter crisis for three months.

The declaration was a state mandate necessary for the city to qualify for part of $553 million in one-time funding set aside by the state Legislature in June to address homelessness across California.

The city has joined with Sacramento County and the nonprofit group Sacramento Steps Forward to apply for $20 million from the state to pay for shelters and programs to help the county’s more than 3,000 homeless people. The city will directly administer about $7.7 million of the funding, received over two and a half years, said Emily Halcon, coordinator of the city’s homeless services.

The shelter crisis declaration will be in effect from December to March and the majority of the city money will likely be used to pay for additional homeless shelters to replace the emergency shelter in North Sacramento, now set to close by Dec. 31.

The city plans to use more than $4 million on at least one new 200-bed triage shelter, according to a report prepared by city staff. The city also plans to open other new low-barrier triage shelters, Steinberg said, though locations for new facilities has yet to be decided.

Steinberg said he plans to announce potential locations early next month and expects at least one facility to open by Jan. 1, when the Railroad Drive center will close.

“(This is) not just to replace Railroad Avenue, which we must, or the capacity, which we must, but to dramatically expand it,” Steinberg said.

The Railroad Drive shelter, the first city-operated low-barrier triage facility, was previously scheduled to close at the end of November but private funding is allowing it to operate through the end of December. It is typically at full capacity, like all shelters in the city on any given night, said Halcon.

Read the whole story here.

Great job demorats!

DCG

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Liberal utopia of Portland, Oregon: Homeless crisis exploding, private citizens now paying homeless to pickup trash

Video NSFW due to cursing.

Large, progressive-run cities on the west coast all have a homeless crisis: Seattle, Portland, San Francisco, etc. MILLIONS of taxpayer dollars are stolen to solve the problem keep the homeless industrial complex alive.

In September I did a blog post that included two videos from The Michael Anderson Show, where he bravely went out and showed you an entire city block and family bike path that was taken over by homeless.

Anderson is back exposing to the good Portland mayor, Ted Wheeler, another area of his city that is run over by filth and garbage.

The area Anderson exposes is between SE 96th and SE Division. He states that the homeless area stretches around for about four city blocks. This part of the “City of Roses” includes homeless encampments, mentally ill people and trash everywhere including needles, feces and material that is a generally a health hazard.

Anderson interviews a homeless man who claims that a private citizen pays him $40/load to pick up trash. Another homeless person claims he is paid $80-90/month to pick up trash.

This is odd considering that Oregon taxpayers are giving the bureaucrats $31 million to fund the Joint Office of Homeless Services. Why do private citizens need to cough up extra monies for garbage collection when they are already contributing MILLIONS of dollars to the homelessness?

The saddest part is where Anderson interviews a US military veteran and he states that many homeless have drug issues and they just don’t want to be helped.

Anderson goes on to describe the amount of money the city has spent to solve NOTHING.

It’s a vicious, vicious cycle that progressives are not willing to solve. After all, someone’s gotta keep that homeless industrial complex alive.

See also:

DCG

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Liberal utopia of Portland, Oregon: Entire city block and family bike path taken over by homeless

Videos NSFW due to some cursing.

Large, progressive-run cities on the west coast all have a homeless crisis: Seattle, Portland, San Francisco, etc. MILLIONS of taxpayer dollars are stolen to solve the problem keep the homeless industrial complex alive.

This past Wednesday, demoRAT Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler told business owners that the laws will be enforced when homeless people disobey them. He specifically told the business owners: “The laws will be enforced, and I’m directing they be enforced.”

Well if the good mayor says so it must be true, right? Let your eyes be the judge of that. I’m sure there are many laws being broken by the homeless in these videos: unlawful urination or defecation, disposal of rubbish, drug use, vandalism, and creating an impassable sidewalk along with health and fire hazards, etc.

The above videos were uploaded this past July by The Michael Anderson Show.  The first shows the area of NE 6th & Everett Street. The second is a family bike path on N Macrum Ave & N Lombard Street.  These areas look like a third-world country.

You better open your progressive eyes, Portland citizens. Your “City of Roses” looks like a sh*t hole.

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DCG

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Ninth Circuit rules that cities can’t prosecute homeless for sleeping on the streets

This will no doubt help keep the homeless industrial complex alive.

From Fox News: Cities can’t prosecute people for sleeping on the streets if they have nowhere else to go because it amounts to cruel and unusual punishment, which is unconstitutional, a federal appeals court said Tuesday.

The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals sided with six homeless people from Boise, Idaho, who sued the city in 2009 over a local ordinance that banned sleeping in public spaces. The ruling could affect several other cities across the U.S. West that have similar laws.

It comes as many places across the West Coast are struggling with homelessness brought on by rising housing costs and income inequality.

When the Boise lawsuit was filed, attorneys for the homeless residents said as many as 4,500 people didn’t have a place to sleep in Idaho’s capital city and homeless shelters only had about 700 available beds or mats. The case bounced back and forth in the courts for years, and Boise modified its rules in 2014 to say homeless people couldn’t be prosecuted for sleeping outside when shelters were full.

But that didn’t solve the problem, the attorneys said, because Boise’s shelters limit the number of days that homeless residents can stay. Two of the city’s three shelters also require some form of religious participation for some programs, making those shelters unsuitable for people with different beliefs, the homeless residents said.

The three-judge panel for the 9th Circuit found that the shelter rules meant homeless people would still be at risk of prosecution even on days when beds were open. The judges also said the religious programming woven into some shelter programs was a problem.

“A city cannot, via the threat of prosecution, coerce an individual to attend religion-based treatment programs consistently with the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment,” Judge Marsha Berzon wrote.

The biggest issue was that the city’s rule violated the U.S. Constitution’s Eighth Amendment against cruel and unusual punishment, the court found. The amendment limits what the government can criminalize, it said.

“As a result, just as the state may not criminalize the state of being ‘homeless in public places,’ the state may not ‘criminalize conduct that is an unavoidable consequence of being homeless — namely sitting, lying, or sleeping on the streets,'” Berzon wrote.

The ruling shows it’s time for Boise officials to start proposing “real solutions,” said Maria Foscarinis, executive director of the National Law Center on Homelessness & Poverty, whose attorneys were among those representing the homeless residents.

In 2007, the 9th Circuit ruled in favor of homeless residents of Los Angeles, finding that as long as there are more homeless residents than there are shelter beds, a law outlawing sleeping outside was unconstitutional. Both sides later reached an agreement and the entire case was eventually thrown out.

In 2009, a federal judge said a Portland, Oregon, policy designed to prevent people from sitting or lying on public sidewalks was unconstitutional. Portland officials now must also give campers at least 24 hours’ notice before cleaning up or moving unsanctioned camps.

A state judge rejected a similar anti-camping law in Everett, Washington.

Sara Rankin, a professor at the Seattle University School of Law and director of its Homeless Rights Advocacy Project, said the ruling will serve as a wake-up call to local governments, forcing them to invest in adequate supportive housing for the chronically homeless.

“I think it’s finally common sense,” Rankin said of the ruling. “There are certain life-sustaining activities that people can’t survive without doing. It’s a really important recognition that people have to be able to legally exist and survive somewhere.”

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DCG

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