Tag Archives: political correctness

Street artist’s Facebook page shut down because of “hate speech” aimed at Zuckerberg

fck zuck

Libtards will find a way to label anything as “hate speech” if it offends their sensibilities.

From Hollywood Reporter: “F*ck Zuck 2020” posters, the symbol after the “F” being a middle finger, were hung in various California cities.

The work of a conservative street artist known for skewering the liberal politics of celebrities and corporations has been deemed “hate speech” by Facebook, which shut his page down on Sunday.

The notice comes just days after the artist known as Sabo attacked Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg with posters disparaging his alleged presidential aspirations. “F*ck Zuck 2020” read the posters, the symbol after the “F” being a middle finger. They were hung in the dead of night last week in various California cities.

“Your page has been unpublished for using hate speech,” read the message at the Unsavory Agents fan page run by Sabo. Sabo is the artist’s pen name and Unsavory Agents is the name of his website and business where his artwork is sold.

Sabo last struck on Friday when he plastered fake ads and posters around Google and YouTube offices in Venice Calif. Those ads, some as large as 30 square feet and some plastered onto bus stop benches, ridiculed Google as a place that is hostile to free thinkers, a reference to the recent firing of an employee who penned a 3,000 word memo to co-workers critical of his employer’s focus on diversity in its hiring practices.

Sabo has also created disparaging street art aimed at Hillary Clinton, Leonardo DiCaprio, Lena Dunham, Cher and many more.

All of it is politically incorrect, Sabo freely acknowledges, but not “hate” worthy of censorship.

While Facebook wasn’t specific as to what it objected to, Sabo assumes it is retribution for his attack on Zuckerberg. Though Facebook may also have objected to recent posters featuring commentary on the Black Lives Matter political movement. Those faux ads, made to look like a genuine movie poster for War for the Planet of the Apes, feature the image of a well-armed ape on horseback with the text: “BLM: Kill Whitey.”

Then again, it could be a host of things that Facebook doesn’t like, considering Sabo has demeaned progressive sacred cows like climate change, affirmative action, transgenderism and much more.

But even though it’s not the first time Facebook has tried to correct his behavior, Sabo is convinced his banishment this time has something to do with Facebook’s leader.

“It took a week, but it finally came down,” Sabo tells THR. “Zuckerberg isn’t only a thief, he’s thin-skinned.”

Facebook didn’t immediately return a request for comment on Sunday.

DCG

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When it comes to political correctness, Millennials have the solution…

safe spaces

Like I’m going to take advice from those who love socialism yet can’t define it. Riiiiight.

From Yahoo (via Business Insider): The heated debate about political correctness is often misunderstood.

While many individuals across generations dislike the pejorative use of political correctness to represent censorship, a closer investigation reveals generational differences in the desire to use inclusive language.

Millennials know that using appropriate language invites rather than restricts productive conversation. Creating a supportive environment makes space for all individuals to feel welcome in sharing their opinions, rather than fearing that people will demonize their personhood and attack their character based on their identities. Thanks to the internet, Millennials are citizens of the globe and ambassadors of social justice. Unfortunately, not all generations understand how using certain words or phrases prohibits dialogue and hurts other people.

To discover five things that all millennials want older generations to know about political correctness that they don’t understand, read the list below.

  1. There is a major difference between ‘being honest’ and spewing prejudice.

You have the right to share your opinion, but you don’t have the right to make people feel threatened. Using emotionally charged words that make others feel frightened for their mental, physical, and emotional wellbeing — even if it does not impact you in the same way — is morally wrong.

Prejudice means possessing strong unfavorable opinions about a person based on their demographics and cultural affiliations. While we all have varying degrees of prejudice, using yours to purposefully harm others, or refusing to stop saying words that others find hurtful, is bullying. Just as you want a teacher to intervene and protect your child from a bully, it’s okay for others to give you the opportunity to correct your behavior when your words are offensive.

  1. Political correctness is not about censorship, it’s about showing respect.

Censorship is a coercive attempt to hide something from people. Asking people to use more inclusive language is not silencing their voice, it’s inviting them to use language in a way that promotes productive conversation.

The purpose of political correctness is to treat all people with the love and respect they deserve. This means calling people by the pronouns they use, and avoiding words and phrases that stereotype and demonize entire groups of people. You can still possess whatever ideology you follow and you can still share your opinion, you’re just being asked to do so in a way that is not hurtful to others.

  1. Millennials feel more connected to global citizenship and human rights than nationalism.

Not only do Millennials have conversations with people around the world, they are also seeing inhumane acts of violence against marginalized people live streamed on social media. This increased visibility and exposure leads to a desire to ensure equality for all individuals, regardless of their race, gender, sexuality, socioeconomic status, or religion.

Nationalism, or the belief that your country and its laws, culture, and government is superior and beyond critique, is not appealing to Millennials. Seeing firsthand pictures and videos on their smartphones of discrimination and unequal rights for people of color, Muslims, immigrants, women, and LGBTQ individuals has increased Millennials desire for social justice.

  1. Inclusive language creates space for meaningful conversations to take place, offensive language makes people feel unsafe.

If you were trying to have a difficult conversation with someone and they opened the discussion using words that were aimed at hurting your feelings, making you feel unsafe, or undermining your personhood, would you want to keep talking?

No, and that’s why everyone should use more inclusive language. When you create space for other people instead of shutting them out, it creates opportunities for honest dialogue to emerge. You’re not being ask [sic] to silence yourself, you’re being asked to use different words and phrases to express your thoughts. That subtle difference is not a big deal — you do it all the time. You don’t speak the same way to your partner as you do your grandmother or your newborn infant. Adjusting your dialogue isn’t a momentous task, and doing so might allow you to have more meaningful conversations with people from all walks of life.

  1. Millennials are not being sensitive, they’re being morally minded and ethically informed global citizens.

Many individuals in older generations think that Millennials are overly sensitive, but it may be the other way around. If Millennials are simply asking older generations to be respectful of others by using more inclusive language, and older generations respond with hostility — a common response to feeling threatened — perhaps older generations are dealing with an underlying fear of being unable to adapt to a changing world.

Making mistakes is part of learning. Most people occasionally say things that hurt other people’s feelings. But the mature individuals are the ones that apologize and then adjust. Continuing to use hurtful language only prevents meaningful and necessary conversations.

DCG

Avoiding making eye contact or asking where someone is from are signs of racism says Oxford University

microaggressions

From Daily Mail: Avoiding making eye contact with someone or asking where they are originally from have been deemed as racist micro-aggressions in a newsletter issued by Oxford University.  The institution’s Equality and Diversity Unit states these two common behaviours could potentially cause the listener ‘mental ill-health’. 

The Trinity term newsletter claims asking someone where they are ‘originally’ from implies that the questioner does not believe they are British.  The Trinity term newsletter also mentions ‘not speaking directly to people’ and ‘jokes drawing attention to someone’s difference’ as possible forms of everyday racism.

It says people doing these things are often ‘well-meaning’, but insists they are still reinforcing negative stereotypes and making people feel like they ‘do not belong’.

But Professor Frank Furedi, author of What’s Happened To The University, said the advice was ‘Orwellian’ and called on Oxford to ‘wake up to reality’.  He told MailOnline: ‘To go from simply stating someone is racist based on what they say to assume they are unconsciously racist is a very Orwellian turn. Microaggressions empower the accuser to say that it doesn’t matter what you intend by that look, I just know by the look of your eyes you are racist.

‘It is a very insidious way of thinking. Universities used to understand the reality that humans are complex.  It would be nice if Oxford could wake up to reality.’

Oxford University said the advice was part of an attempt to fight discrimination and encourage equality of opportunity. Students at the university recently took part in a campaign called ‘I, too, am Oxford’, to raise awareness of unconscious racism.

At one college, Pembroke, students are advised by their representatives to report ‘macro and microaggressions’ to a welfare officer. She will then deal with the issue by ‘mediation with the other party’ or ‘through the harassment policy’.

Professor Furedi said giving advice on avoiding microaggressions happens at ‘virtually every’ university in the USA, but is fairly new to the UK. The Emeritus Professor of Sociology at Kent University urged British students to resist the trend, adding: ‘A minority of students make it their own cause. ‘But there are usually a lot of people who think it is stupid but they acquiesce to it and eventually the influence of these ideas becomes more prominent.’

An Oxford University spokesman told MailOnline: ‘The Equality and Diversity Unit works with University bodies to ensure that the University’s pursuit of excellence goes hand in hand with freedom from discrimination and equality of opportunity.

‘The newsletter is one way of advising and supporting staff towards achieving these aims.’

The row comes two months after a Cambridge college was accused of ‘cultural misrepresentation’ by students after serving ‘Jamaican stew’ and ‘Tunisian rice’.  Students argued the dishes served at Pembroke College were not authentic to countries they were described to be from, The Sunday Times reported.

The original complainant said: ‘I’m used to as a minority student being constantly invalidated when flagging up specific issues but if people feel their cultures are misrepresented they have the right to address this. Micro-aggressions are a reality of the everyday exist­ence of many people of colour.’

DCG

All hail political correctness: UK university wants to control the words students use

gender-nuetral-terms

From BBC: Cardiff Metropolitan University‘s code of practice on using inclusive language encourages the use of “gender-neutral terms”.

Author Dr. Joanna Williams said they were “unnecessary” and “authoritarian”. The university said it was committed to “providing an environment where everyone is valued”. The university recognised language “can be a contentious issue” and developed its code of practice to “promote fairness and equality”.

It recommended using gender-neutral terms and avoiding generalisations or assumptions based on stereotypes. The university checklist makes alternative suggestions:

  • Best man for the job – best person for the job
  • Fireman – firefighter
  • Housewife – shopper, consumer, homemaker
  • Manpower – human resources, labour force, staff, personnel, workers
  • Tax man – tax inspector (I use a completely different word for anyone associated with the IRS)
  • Sportsmanship – fairness, good humour, sense of fair play
  • Gentleman’s agreement – unwritten agreement, agreement based on trust

Dr. Williams, author of Academic Freedom in an Age of Conformity, told BBC Wales the guidelines were “very authoritarian” and universities “should trust academics to be able to communicate with each other without being permanently offended”.

She said language changes and evolves and many of the words on the university’s checklist were “falling out of fashion”.

“If you look at their origins they are not really based on an exclusionary idea,” she said. “The words have come to encompass more than just men. They are more general.”

Cardiff Metropolitan University is not the only university said to have freedom of speech restrictions. Spiked magazine, of which Dr. Williams is the education editor, recently published the results of its latest Free Speech University Rankings.

Of 115 UK universities surveyed, 63.5% were found to “actively censor speech” and 30.5% were found to “stifle speech through excessive regulation”.

Dr. Williams said universities need to stop restricting freedom of speech and that their codes of practice “demonstrate a shocking lack of trust”.

“Schools wouldn’t publish such a list for children, yet they are being used for adults,” she said.

A spokeswoman for Cardiff Metropolitan University said it makes “an unequivocal commitment to providing an environment where everyone is valued as an individual, and where students and staff can work, learn, flourish and develop their skills and knowledge in an atmosphere of dignity and respect”.

She said the code of practice on using inclusive language “sets out a broad approach to promoting fairness and equality through raising awareness about the effects of potentially discriminatory vocabulary”.

“It makes suggestions for the avoidance of inappropriate generalisations and provides some illustrative examples of gender-laden vocabulary with some neutral alternatives.” She added complaints about the “excesses of so-called political correctness” and their impact are not new.

“For Cardiff Met, though, academic freedom and the celebration of diversity are cornerstones of university life – and are entirely compatible with each other.”

DCG

Indiana city renames Columbus Day and Good Friday to be more ‘culturally sensitive’

I’ve never been to Bloomington and don’t plan to go there in the future. 

And you PC warriors can try to rename a Christian holiday all you want. Won’t change the truth, much as ‘ya try…

liberal nonsense

From Daily Mail: An Indiana city has renamed two holidays in a bid to be more culturally sensitive.

Columbus Day and Good Friday will now be known as Fall and Spring Holiday in Bloomington, the Bloomington Herald-Times reports.

Mayor John Hamilton (contact him at the link), who made the change on Friday, said the politically correct names will make the two holidays more inclusive in a memo to city employees.

PC Bloomington Mayor John Hamilton

PC Bloomington Mayor John Hamilton

‘We are terrifically proud of our diverse workforce at the city,’ Hamilton wrote. ‘That diversity makes us stronger and more representative of the public we proudly serve. These updated names for two days of well-merited time off is another way we can demonstrate our commitment to inclusivity.’

All city employees receive paid time off for Columbus Day, a federal holiday, and Good Friday, which isn’t. Good Friday is observed on the Friday before Easter Sunday by many Christians as the day Jesus was crucified. Columbus Day celebrates the arrival of Italian explorer Christopher Columbus to the Americas on October 12, 1492.

However, the celebration has come under fire by critics who say the discovery of the Americas by European colonizers led to centuries of oppression for Native Americans.

Residents of Bloomington – which has a population of 82,575 – are likely to welcome the move as the city and surrounding Monroe County is overwhelmingly liberal, due in part to the presence of Indiana University. Monroe County gave Hillary Clinton 58.6 per cent of the vote in the recent presidential election – and almost 14,000 votes more than Donald Trump.

DCG

Professor who tweeted against PC culture out at NYU

liberal tolerance

Via NY Post: An NYU professor crusading against political correctness and student coddling was booted from the classroom last week after his colleagues complained about his “incivility,” The Post has learned.

Liberal studies prof Michael Rectenwald, 57, said he was forced Wednesday to go on paid leave for the rest of the semester. “They are actually pushing me out the door for having a different perspective,” the academic told The Post.

Michael Rectenwald

Michael Rectenwald

Rectenwald launched an undercover Twitter account called Deplorable NYU Prof on Sept. 12 to argue against campus trends like “safe spaces,” “trigger warnings” and other aspects of academia’s growing PC culture.

He chose to be anonymous, he explained in one of his first tweets, because he was afraid “the PC Gestapo would ruin me” if he put his name ­behind his conservative ideas on the famously liberal campus.

“I remember once on my Facebook I posted a story about a kid who changed his pronoun to ‘His Majesty’ because I thought it was funny,” he told The Post. “Then I got viciously attacked by 400 people. This whole milieu is nauseating. I grew tired of it, so I made the account.”

On Oct. 11, Rectenwald used his ­Internet alter ego to criticize “safe spaces” — the recent campus trend of “protecting” students from uncomfortable speech — as “at once a hall of mirrors and a rubber room.”

Two weeks ago he posted on his “anti-PC” feed a photo of a flyer put out by NYU resident advisers telling students how to avoid wearing potentially offensive Halloween costumes. “The scariest thing about Halloween today is . . . the liberal totalitarian costume surveillance,” he wrote.

“It’s an alarming curtailment of free expression to the point where you can’t even pretend to be something without authorities coming down on you in the universities,” Rectenwald told The Post.

But the Twitter feed soon sparked a “witch hunt” by the growing army of “social justice warriors,” he said. And so, when he was approached on Twitter by a reporter with the Washington Square News, NYU’s student newspaper, the untenured assistant professor agreed to an interview.

“I thought there was nothing objectionable about what I had said,” he told The Post. “My contention is that the trigger warning, safe spaces and bias hot-line reporting is not politically correct. It is insane,” he told the student paper in an interview published Monday.

But Rectenwald says he began getting “dirty looks” in his department and on Wednesday figured out why: A 12-person committee calling itself the Liberal Studies Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Working Group, including two deans, published a letter to the editor in the same paper.

“As long as he airs his views with so little appeal to evidence and civility, we must find him guilty of illogic and incivility in a community that predicates its work in great part on rational thought and the civil exchange of ideas,” they wrote.

“We seek to create a dynamic community that values full participation. Such efforts are not the ‘destruction of academic integrity’ Professor Rectenwald suggests, but rather what make possible our program’s approach to global studies,” they argued.

Rectenwald likened the attack to “a Salem witch trial. They took my views personally. I never even mentioned them and I never even said NYU liberal studies program. I was talking about academia at large.”

The same day that letter was published, Rectenwald was summoned to a meeting with his department dean and an HR representative, he says. “They claimed they were worried about me and a couple people had expressed concern about my mental health,” Rectenwald told The Post.

NYU spokesman Matt Nagel

NYU spokesman Matt Nagel

The leave has “absolutely zero to do with his Twitter account or his opinions on issues of the day,” said NYU spokesman Matt Nagel, refusing to elaborate on the reason.

But Rectenwald is disheartened. “I’m afraid my academic career is over,” he said . “Academic freedom: It’s great, as long as you don’t use it.”

DCG

Clint Eastwood Rips ‘P*ssy Generation,’ Says He’ll Vote For Donald Trump

Trigger warning for the easily-offended special snowflakes.

clint eastwood

From Huffington Post: Clint Eastwood is calling out the “pussy generation” for being too politically correct, and says anyone offended by Donald Trump’s history of racist remarks should “just fucking get over it.” 

In an interview with Esquire magazine, the Academy Award winner said Trump was “onto something” because “he’s just saying what’s on his mind.” “And sometimes it’s not so good,” Eastwood said. “And sometimes it’s … I mean, I can understand where he’s coming from, but I don’t always agree with it.”

Eastwood explained:

“You know, he’s a racist now because he’s talked about this judge. And yeah, it’s a dumb thing to say. I mean, to predicate your opinion on the fact that the guy was born to Mexican parents or something. He’s said a lot of dumb things. So have all of them. Both sides. But everybody—the press and everybody’s going, ‘Oh, well, that’s racist,’ and they’re making a big hoodoo out of it. Just f*cking get over it. It’s a sad time in history.”

Eastwood also spoke out against political correctness:

“(S)ecretly everybody’s getting tired of political correctness, kissing up. That’s the kiss-ass generation we’re in right now. We’re really in a pussy generation. Everybody’s walking on eggshells. We see people accusing people of being racist and all kinds of stuff. When I grew up, those things weren’t called racist. And then when I did Gran Torino, even my associate said, ‘This is a really good script, but it’s politically incorrect.’ And I said, ‘Good. Let me read it tonight.’ The next morning, I came in and I threw it on his desk and I said, ‘We’re starting this immediately.’”

Eastwood said he planned to vote for Trump, but called it a “tough one” and didn’t endorse the Republican presidential candidate.

empty chair

As for that now-famous 2012 Republican National Convention speech where Eastwood lectured an empty chair as if it were President Barack Obama, the actor/filmmaker explained that after a series of speeches praising then-nominee Mitt Romney, he felt he had to do something different:

“And so I’m listening to an old Neil Diamond thing and he’s going, “And no one heard at all / Not even the chair.” And I’m thinking, That’s Obama. He doesn’t go to work. He doesn’t go down to Congress and make a deal. What the hell’s he doing sitting in the White House?

Eastwood’s next film, “Sully,” opens in September and stars Tom Hanks as “Miracle on the Hudson” pilot Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger.

DCG