Tag Archives: Peter Strzok

Elites’ contempt for America’s white middle class

In early March 2016, three months before the last Republican Party primary elections that sealed Trump’s ascendancy as the party’s presidential nominee, Politico Magazine contributing editor Michael Lind called Trump “the Perfect Populist”—”one with broader appeal to the right and the center than his predecessors in recent American political history—so much so it could put him in the White House”.

Lind was unusual among pundits in predicting Trump’s electoral victory, as according to polling data he did not have even an outside chance of winning. What catapulted Trump to the White House, to the enduring shock and disbelief of the Democratic Party, was his message of what Victor Davis Hanson in his book The Case for Trump identified as “middle-class populism”—a populism of “less government, doubt over overseas military commitments, fears of redistribution and globalization, and distrust of cultural elites.” Their distrust, Hanson maintains, fundamentally was a reaction, not a catalyst, to the elites’ contempt for the white middle class:

[S]corn for the white middle class . . . was widespread among many elites, and it ignited a Trump backlash . . . . The anger that Trump tapped had been a long time in coming. But few politicians knew it firsthand, much less saw it as merited or even useful in the political sense . . . . [Trump] had seen a critical preexisting and vast swath of potential voters in proverbial swing states who were . . . resentful over the disdain shown them by elites, especially the likes of Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton. And they were irate at the winners of globalization who had somehow blamed them for being the global economy’s losers.

In other words, the elites’ contempt for the white middle and working classes predated the 2016 election.

Except in the cases of Obama and Hillary Clinton, the following account of contemptuous elites are from Hanson’s The Case for Trump.

To begin, eight years before the 2016 election, at a fundraising event in San Francisco on April 6, 2008, presidential hopeful Barack Obama condescendingly dismissed working-class voters in old industrial towns decimated by job losses as “bitter” people who “cling to guns or religion or antipathy to people who aren’t like them or anti-immigrant sentiment or anti-trade sentiment as a way to explain their frustrations.”

For her part, at an LGBT fundraiser in Manhattan on September 9, 2016, Democrat presidential nominee Hillary Clinton urged supporters to “stage an intervention” if they had friends who might vote Trump. She then dissed millions of Americans over whom she intended to rule as president. Clinton said, “you could put half of Trump’s supporters into what I call the ‘basket of deplorables’. The racist, sexist, homophobic, xenophobic, Islamophobic — you name it.” After she lost the election to Trump and the “deplorables,” in a public speech in Mumbai, India on March 10, 2018, Clinton redoubled her contempt for Trump voters. She said, “So I won the places that are optimistic, diverse, dynamic, moving forward,” thereby implying that the 63 million Americans who had voted for Trump were demoralized, monotonous, listless, and degenerating.

Hillary Clinton’s aides were just as dismissive. In her book Chasing Hillary: Ten Years, Two Presidential Campaigns, and One Intact Glass Ceiling, New York Times reporter Amy Chozick described how Clinton’s inner circle looked down on Trump voters as fodder for their amusement: “The Deplorables always got a laugh, over living-room chats in the Hamptons, at dinner parties under the stars on Martha’s Vineyard, over passed hors d’oeuvres in Beverly Hills, and during sunset cocktails in Silicon Valley.”

Elites less prominent than Obama and Clinton similarly were contemptuous of Trump supporters. As examples, on August 12, 2016, FBI agent Peter Strzok texted to his paramour Lisa Page (both are married) that Trump voters stank: “Just went to a southern Virginia Walmart. I could SMELL the Trump support.” Another unidentified FBI employee texted an FBI attorney on the day after the 2016 election that “Trump’s supporters are all poor to middle class, uneducated, lazy POS [pieces of sh*t].”

In a tweet on January 7, 2017, Melinda Byerley, founder of the Silicon Valley company Timeshare CMO, wrote: “One thing middle America could do is to realize that no educated person wants to live in a sh**hole with stupid people. Especially violent, racist, and/or misogynistic ones . . . . When corporations think about where to locate call centers, factories, development centers, etc., they also have to deal with the fact that those towns have nothing going for them. No infrastructure, just a few bars and a terrible school system.”

Some members of the media were just as disdainful. In a tweet on August 2018, Politico reporter Marc Caputo mocked the crowd at a Trump rally as toothless hicks: “If you put everyone’s mouths together in this video, you’d get a full set of teeth.” Although Caputo initialy apologized for and deleted the tweet, he later doubled down, calling Trump supporters “garbage people.”

Another journalist, tech writer and member of the New York Times’s editorial board Sarah Jeong, a graduate of Harvard Law School who is of Korean heritage, tweeted: “Are white people genetically predisposed to burn faster in the sun, thus logically being only fit to live underground like groveling goblins?”; “Oh man it’s kind of sick how much joy I get out of being cruel to old white men”; and “White people marking up the internet with their opinions like dogs pissing on fire hydrants.”

Hillary Clinton wasn’t the only politician who regarded Trump voters with unconcealed contempt. On September 15, 2018, during a speech at the Human Rights Campaign’s annual dinner in Washington, D.C., former Vice President Joe Biden called the deplorables “virulent” “dregs of society”. He said: “Despite losing in the courts, and in the court of opinion, these forces of intolerance remain determined to undermine and roll back the progress you all have made. This time they—not you—have an ally in the White House. This time they have an ally. They’re a small percentage of the American people—virulent people, some of them the dregs of society.” Hanson points out that those “dregs of society” in 2016 numbered 63 million—46% of all Americans who voted.

Nor were Progressives the only elites who held the white middle and working classes in contempt. Republican “never Trumpers” were equally derisive.

In a March 2016 op-ed, National Review’s conservative social critic Kevin Williamson wrote: “The truth about these dysfunctional, downscale communities is that they deserve to die. Economically, they are negative assets. Morally, they are indefensible . . . . The white American underclass is in thrall to a vicious, selfish culture whose main products are misery and used heroin needles.”

On February 8, 2017, on a panel at the American Enterprise Institute, Bill Kristol, founder of the Weekly Standard, said white, working-class Americans should be replaced by immigrants. Kristol said:

“Look, to be totally honest, if things are so bad as you say with the white working class, don’t you want to get new Americans in? Basically if you are in free society, a capitalist society, after two, three, four generations of hard work, everyone becomes kind of decadent, lazy, spoiled, whatever. Then, luckily, you have these waves of people coming in from Italy, Ireland, Russia, and now Mexico, who really want to work hard and really want to succeed, and really want their kids to live better lives than them, and aren’t sort of clipping coupons or hoping that they can hang on and, meanwhile, grew up as spoiled kids and so forth.”

Another “never Trumper” conservative who became a self-described “man without a party” after the 2016 election, expressed the same wish. In a June 18, 2018 op-ed, Washington Post columnist Max Boot wrote: “If only we could keep the hard-working Latin American newcomers and deport the contemptible Republican cowards—that would truly enhance America’s greatness.”

For his part, New York Times conservative columnist David Brooks, with the ragged teeth, echoed the same sentiments in a January 29, 2018 op-ed: “These rural places are often 95 percent white . . . . They are often marked by economic stagnation, social isolation, family breakdown and high opioid addiction . . . . It is a blunt fact of life that, these days, immigrants show more of these virtues than the native-born.”

Hanson points out that these Progressive and conservative “never Trump” elites not only are racist, they are hypocrites. Conveniently, the elites excused their crude stereotyping of white, middle America by insisting that racism against whites was not racism. While accusing the middle and working classes they deride for “white privilege,” the elites are blind to their own outsized privileges. In Hanson’s words:

Often the white elite signaled their disgust of the ‘white privilege’ of the disintegrating middle class as a means of exempting their own quite genuine white privilege of insider contacts, professional degrees, wealth, inheritance, and influence.

I am baffled by why the elites hold such virulent hatred and contempt for America’s white middle and working classes who have built this country. It is a phenomenon for psychiatric professionals to explain. Alas, being of the same privileged professional elite class, they probably are infected with the same virus.

Perhaps our readers can hazard some guesses to explain this phenomenon.

~Eowyn

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Kristy Swanson and Dean Cain get death threat over pro-Trump production

From Yahoo: Kristy Swanson, famed for starring in the 1992 film version of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, says she and actor Dean Cain have received a “death threat” over a live stage reading they are starring in next month — because it supports Donald Trump.

As Politico has reported, the conservative actors are set to play former Trump-Russia investigators Peter Strzok and Lisa Page in a Washington, D.C. performance titled FBI Lovebirds: Undercovers. The reading will pore over the former FBI agents’ text messages to each other, highlighting their extramarital affair and disdain for Trump. Cain will play Strzok, while Swanson has been cast as Page.

But news of the production, which Politico described as “Trumpian,” has stirred up some animosity from critics of the president.

Swanson, who frequently tweets pro-Trump messages, shared a screenshot on a tweet sent by an anonymous troll threatening to “lock the doors and set the theater on fire.”

The actress called the message a “death threat” and demanded it be reported. Cain retweeted her post.

She later noted that the tweet had been removed, but was disappointed that the account which sent it hadn’t been “banned.”

Her fans voiced their outrage over the incident, saying the “threat” wasn’t being taken more seriously because of Swanson’s right-wing views.

Meanwhile, director Phelim McAleer is raising money to support the production, with just over $7,000 of its $95,000 goal collected so far.

“I have taken the actual hate-filled, sleazy, juvenile, corrupt text messages of top FBI operatives and lovers Peter Strzok and Lisa Page, and combined it with the transcript of their behind-closed-doors congressional testimony to show how they, and their Deep State colleagues, planned to take down the president of the United States,” the crowdfunding page reads. “This will be revealed on stage in the very words of the FBI agents.

“These dangerous people need to be exposed,” McAleer continues. “People need to see what they were saying behind closed doors. That’s why this filmed re-enactment of the texts is so important. Everyone needs to see this. So please give what you can — help with the crowdfunding so we can show the establishment and the mainstream media that we are not going to take it anymore.”

DCG

Update:

Conservative director Philip McAleer, who’s raising money to support the production of FBI Lovebirds: Undercovers as a play and movie, also produced and co-wrote GOSNELL – The Trial of America’s Most Prolific Serial Killer, which was the No. 1 independent movie in the US on its opening weekend. The movie starred Dean Cain.

To donate to FBI Lovebirds’ crowdfunding, click here or go to https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/fbi-lovebirds-undercovers–2#/

~Eowyn

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FBI agent Peter Strzok looked possessed; wiggles like a snake like Hillary Clinton

Sun, 15 Jul 2018 13:33:00 +0000

eowyn2

Peter Strzok (pronounced “struck”) is the FBI agent and chief of the Bureau’s Counterespionage Section who led two of the FBI’s most important investigations into:

  1. Hillary Clinton’s illegal use of a personal email server while she was Obama’s Secretary of State.
  2. Russian interference in and alleged collusion with Donald Trump in the 2016 presidential election.

Strzok had worked with Special Counsel Robert Mueller in the Russian investigation, but was removed in late July 2017 after the discovery of some 50,000 text messages he’d exchanged with Lisa Page — a colleague who was also working on the Russian investigation and with whom Strzok was having an adulterous affair — throughout the 2016 presidential election and first year of the Trump administration.

In their text messages, Strzok and Page show their clear political bias against Donald Trump and for Hillary Clinton, although FBI agents are supposed to be non-partisan in doing their work. The two adulterers bashed Trump and discussed concerns about being too tough on Hillary Clinton in their investigation into her unlawful use of a private email server.

Here are some anti-Trump comments in the Strzok-Page text messages (sources: CBS Miami; Fox News):

Strzok: “[Bernie Sanders is] an idiot like Trump.”

Page: “God Trump is a loathsome human.” Strzok responded: “This man cannot be president.”

In one particular message, when Page asked if Trump would ever become president, Strzok replied, “No. No he won’t. We’ll stop it.

Interestingly, in the text messages, Strzok also said he was hesitant to join Mueller’s Russian investigation because of his “gut sense” that there was “no big there there.” Indeed, to this day, Mueller has not found even a shred of evidence of a Trump-Russian collusion.

On July 12, 2018, an arrogant Strzok testified at an extraordinary congressional hearing, described by the AP as “chaotic” and “devolved into shouting matches”. Strzok brazenly denied that the personal beliefs expressed in his text messages, including his “We’ll stop Trump” vow, had affected his work for the FBI in any way or that he and the FBI “would take any action whatsoever to improperly impact the electoral process for any candidate.” Cynically waving the flag, Strzok accused Congress’ investigation into him as misguided and playing into “our enemies’ campaign to tear America apart.”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BF70Sno9rBU

Aside from Strzok’s wholly self-serving and downright unbelievable testimony, what is really disturbing about the hearing is his appearance and demeanor.

There’s no other word for it: Strzok looked possessed, with evil eyes and horns sprouting above his eyebrows.

But it’s not just the evil eyes and devil’s horns.

Strzok also did this really, really strange wiggle during the Congressional hearing:

In a tweet on July 12, conservative actor James Wood reminds us that Hillary Clinton, too, wiggled like Peter Strzok: “Great snakes writhe alike…”

[wpvideo pyMI4XzS]

Meanwhile, an insane Hillary actually invoked slavery as a reason against Trump’s nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court, claiming Kavanaugh would bring back slavery by “turning the clock back to the 1850s”.

H/t All News Pipeline, Western Journalism, Kelleigh, and FOTM‘s Jackie Puppet

~Eowyn

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