Tag Archives: Paris Climate Accord

The libtard butt hurt is still strong: Hollyweird “power players” whine about Trump

crybaby

These people take themselves way too seriously, as if they are relevant or something.

From Hollywood Reporter: It’s no secret that Hollywood’s not a fan of Donald Trump.

From outspoken condemnations such as Meryl Streep’s infamous Golden Globes speech — in which she criticized Trump’s remarks about a disabled reporter during the 2016 campaign — to director Judd Apatow’s consistent lambasting tweets, criticisms of the president are widespread among the leaders of the entertainment industry.

When asked how his presidency has affected their work and life, those who made the cut for the THR 100 — The Hollywood Reporter’s second annual ranking of the most powerful people in entertainment — had a variety of responses.

Some stayed mum, including Disney CEO Bob Iger (No. 1 on the THR 100), though he notably resigned from Trump’s Strategic and Policy Forum June 1 in the wake of Trump’s withdrawal from the Paris climate accord signed by nearly every other country. Fox TV Group chairman and co-CEO Dana Walden (No. 16) also skirted the subject of Trump. “I’m not talking about him right now,” she said. “Too depressing.”

Others were much more forthcoming, such as Feud and American Horror Story creator Ryan Murphy (No. 28). “At least the first hour of every day is dedicated to talking about the writers’ and staffers’ anxieties about the world, vis a vis the Trump administration, and then how are we going to put those anxieties into art,” said the four-time Emmy winner of the atmosphere in his writers room. “That’s new.”

FX Networks CEO John Landgraf (No. 24) didn’t pull any punches as he noted the stress of the last several months. “Trump has made me way more anxious, almost every day. It’s not about politics,” Landgraf said. “It’s about integrity. Judging by his behavior, he is completely amoral, does not believe in the democratic separation of powers enshrined in our Constitution, and recognizes no truth beyond himself — beyond what he needs to be the truth for his own emotional comfort in any given moment. It is scary to me that I have fellow citizens who still think he should be our president.

Some acknowledged the president’s role in revitalizing their work — and deepening its meaning. “Trump is good for the business of escapism,” said Get Out director Jordan Peele (No. 93), while Wonder Woman helmer Patty Jenkins (No. 94) shared a similar, yet slightly more earnest, sentiment: “I think he has put the messages and discussions that I want to have more in focus and pertinent than ever.”

Actor/producer Tyler Perry (No. 67) says Trump “reinvigorated my resolve to bring light and laughter and healing to this world,” while Selma and 13th director Ava DuVernay (No. 70) admitted the president has “devastated me in many ways, but each of those ways has made me more determined than before.” Oscar-winning producer Brian Grazer (No. 95) has been similarly influenced. “I make a lot of Horatio Alger underdog stories,” said the Imagine Entertainment partner. “So his presence in the White House affects how I do that.”

Nancy Dubuc (No. 44), president and CEO of A+E Networks, took a more measured view: “Our allegiance is to our audience,” she said, adding, “We’re careful to listen and represent diverse points of view and bring forward tough issues through the power of storytelling, when warranted.”

For recently appointed Sony Pictures and Entertainment CEO and chairman Tony Vinciquerra (No. 26), the controversy around Trump has had a positive impact. “Political discourse is at an all-time high everywhere I look,” he said. “Given voter apathy, as evidenced by L.A.’s recent 11 percent mayoral voter turnout, hopefully this political discourse will increase citizen engagement.”

Kevin Beggs (No. 91), chairman of Lionsgate TV Group, echoed Vinciquerra’s respect for open political discourse and public engagement. “What is unfolding in the White House is a powerful reminder that politics matter,” Beggs said. “Complacency is the enemy of democracy and it feels like, after decades of relative disinterest or disgust with the political process, people across the socioeconomic spectrum are paying attention. The surge in news readership and viewership is truly inspiring.”

A few THR 100 honorees had a lighter take on Trump, including NBC chairman Robert Greenblatt (No. 27). “We have one less reality show on our schedule,” the studio exec said, referencing the president’s not-so-distant past as Apprentice host. And Greenblatt wasn’t the only one to bring up the president’s history as a star of the small screen. “I finally watch reality TV full-time when I get home: the news,” said Supergirl and Arrow executive producer Greg Berlanti (No. 52).

UTA CEO and managing director Jeremy Zimmer (No. 33) admits that Trump has bolstered his reputation at home. Quipped the top agent, “He has made my kids think that I am highly moral and incredibly smart.”

DCG

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‘Eco-friendly’ de Blasio won’t give up SUV rides to gym

bill de blasio in suv ny post photo

Bill de Blasio: Do as I say, not as I do./NY Post photo

Why should he? The climate alarmists only want us peons to alter our lifestyles. The elites make the rules, not live by them.

From NY Post: Mayor de Blasio says all New Yorkers must change their lifestyle to curb carbon emissions — well, all except one man: Mayor de Blasio.

Hizzoner portrayed himself as an eco champion on Friday, announcing plans to ban plastic bags and beef up enforcement against idling vehicles, and called on all his constituents to alter their habits in light of President Trump’s withdrawal the Paris climate accord. “Everyone in our own life needs to change our habits to start protecting the Earth,” he said in his weekly appearance on WNYC radio.

But when asked to explain why he needs a motorcade of gas-guzzling SUVs to take him from Gracie Mansion to Park Slope, Brooklyn, just to exercise at a YMCA, he didn’t have an answer — and declined to give up the habit. “The issue is not cheap symbolism,” he said testily.

The question was raised by a caller into the show. “How about you stepping up your game and leading by example [by] getting out of your SUV armada?” said the caller, Charles Komanoff, a longtime energy-policy expert from Manhattan and a Carbon Tax Center founder.

“And if you need to go to the Park Slope Y five days a week rather than a gym near you, why don’t you take mass transit or even once in a while ride a bike like the vast majority of your fellow New Yorkers so you will know how we are suffering under a transit system?”

De Blasio defended his rides by noting that his SUV is a “fuel-efficient” hybrid.

I wish my life was like everyone else’s, but it’s not, for obvious reasons. But again, the issue is not cheap symbolism here. The issue is, Are we going to take action? Are we going to change the way things are done?” he said.

The mayor is ferried to the Y by two SUVs — a regular GMC Yukon XL, which burns 16 mpg in the city, and a Chevrolet Tahoe Hybrid, which is only slightly more fuel efficient at 20 mpg.

De Blasio also suggested the city would start cracking down on idling cars — even though his own fleet has been caught waiting with their engines on for up to an hour outside the gym. “Idling is a huge problem, and blocking the box is huge problem,” the mayor said. “I will have more to say on that in the coming weeks.”

Komanoff, who said he voted for de Blasio in the last election, later told The Post he was “appalled” by the mayor’s “tone deaf” reply to his question.

“This whole ‘tale of two cities’ thing — I guess he really fancies himself as one of the little guys,” he said, invoking de Blasio’s campaign theme. “Most of us are little guys, and no one looks on him as one of us when he gets ferried everywhere in his armada.”

He said the mayor’s fuel-burning trips to the gym set a bad example. “This is what makes the climate issue such an easy mark for the right wing,” he said. “It’s so easy to characterize this [as an issue] the elites drag out to make the common person feel bad for driving around in a pickup truck.”

DCG

Why President Trump got U.S. out of bad-for-America Paris Climate Accord

Yesterday, after briefly describing America’s economic progress since his inauguration, President Trump announced that the United States is out of the 2015 Paris Climate (Change) Accord.

He said (beg. at the 3:13 mark of video below):

“I am fighting every day for the great people of this country. Therefore, in order to fulfill my solemn duty to protect America and its citizens, the United States will withdraw from the Paris Climate Accord … but begin negotiations to reenter either the Paris Accord or a really entirely new transaction on terms that are fair to the United States, its businesses, its workers, its people, its taxpayers…we will see if we can make a deal that’s fair. And if we can, that’s great. And if we can’t, that’s fine….

Thus, as of today, the United States will cease all implementation of the non-binding Paris Accord and the draconian financial and economic burdens the agreement imposes on our country. This includes ending the implementation of the nationally determined contribution and, very importantly, the Green Climate Fund which is costing the United States a vast fortune.

These are the reasons given by President Trump for pulling the U.S. out of the Accord (read his full speech here). Simply put the Paris Climate Accord is:

  1. Bad for America: In Trump’s words, the agreement “disadvantages the United States to the exclusive benefit of other countries, leaving American workers — whom I love — and taxpayers to absorb the cost in terms of lost jobs, lower wages, shuttered factories, and vastly diminished economic production”. According to the National Economic Research Associates, compliance with the terms of the Paris Accord could cost America:
    1. 2.7 million lost jobs by 2025, including 440,000 fewer manufacturing jobs.
    2. By 2040, $3 trillion in lost GDP, 6.5 million industrial jobs, $7,000 less income (or worse) for U.S. households, and cut production for the following sectors: paper down 12%; cement down 23%; iron and steel down 38%; coal down 86%; natural gas down 31%.
  2. Unfair, in that the Accord punishes the U.S. but does nothing about the world’s leading polluters:
    1. China will be able to increase their emissions by 13 years. India makes its participation “contingent on receiving billions and billions and billions of dollars in foreign aid from developed countries.”
    2. U.S. must get rid of our coal plants, but not Europe, China, or India. In India’s case, its coal production will be allowed to double by 2020. “In short, the agreement doesn’t eliminate coal jobs, it just transfers those jobs out of America and the United States, and ships them to foreign countries.”
  3. A massive redistribution of U.S. wealth to other countries.
  4. Ineffective: “Even if the Paris Agreement were implemented in full, with total compliance from all nations, it is estimated it would only produce a two-tenths of one degree…Celsius reduction in global temperature by the year 2100…. In fact, 14 days of carbon emissions from China alone would…totally wipe out the gains from America’s expected reductions in the year 2030, after we have had to spend billions and billions of dollars, lost jobs, closed factories, and suffered much higher energy costs for our businesses and for our homes.”

In other words, the Paris Climate Accord is destructive of America’s economy, unfair, a socialist wealth redistribution in disguise, and ineffectual in actually lowering global temperature. So why would America, unless we were really stupid and self-destructive, want to be a part of this Accord?

And if we are judged by the enemies we have, then Trump’s decision to pull the U.S. from the Paris agreement is a wise one, as the heads of anti-America Hollyweirdos and other globalists explode at the news. See “President Trump nixes Paris Climate Agreement; Hollyweird libtards’ & globalists’ heads explode“.

See also:

~Eowyn