Tag Archives: Oxford University

Debauched Oxford University students raped a goat

Within England’s elitist Oxford University is a secret society called the Piers Gaveston Society.
As described by the UK newspaper, The Guardian, the Piers Gaveston is a “highly exclusive” men-only club, made up of a self-selecting group of 12 undergraduates. Named after the alleged male lover of Edward II, king of England from 1307 to 1327, the Society was founded in 1977 and carries the Latin motto “Fane non memini ne audisse unum alterum ita dilixisse” or, in English:

“Truly, none remember hearing of a man enjoying another so much”

Like its namesake, Piers Gaveston encourages and indulges in what The Mail describes as “excess, high camp [and] ostentatious decadence” and prides itself on being a clandestine organization. Its members are given obscure titles such as “Poker”, “Despenser” (Hugh le, Earl of Winchester, a favorite of King Edward II), and “Catamite” (a boy who has a sexual relationship with a man), who all observe the Sicilian code of Omertà, maintaining silence about the club.
Every year, Piers Gaveston holds a summer ball, described by the Telegraph as parties where “Cross-dressing is as likely to feature as speed-laced jelly. The rules are simple – there are none.” Each member invites 20 guests – preferably more women than men. The invitees are given 72 hours’ notice and told to turn up for a hired coach that would drive them to an undisclosed destination in the countryside.

July 1, 2017, that “posh” (upper-class) half-naked students were seen queuing up to board the bus to this year’s £90-per-head ball Piers Gaveston summer ball held in a remote field — the females wearing only nipple tassels and body paint, the men in high heels.

Reportedly, “revellers” at the ball fornicated a goat. A poster on student gossip page Oxfeu wrote:

“Shoutout to those at Piers Gav who decided to f*** a goat — great to know Oxford remains a bastion of intellect.”

On Oxford missed connections page Oxlove, a poster wrote:

“To the guy I slept with in the orgy tent at the PG, let’s get a drink?”

Another student wrote:

“Oriel blonde in the pink skirt: why did you reject me at gav? You are the reason I went and yet you refused to join me in the sex tent.”

Another posted:

“To the guy wearing baubles at the Gav, it’s not christmas but you’re a gift I’d like to have. About your bod no one could ever lament. So next year meet me in the orgy tent?”


Piers Gaveston past members include movie actor Hugh Grant and former UK Prime Minister David Cameron who took part in an initiation ceremony in which Cameron screwed a dead pig’s mouth, according to an unofficial biography of Cameron written by Conservative donor Lord Ashcroft who claims to have photographic evidence. (The Guardian)
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~Eowyn

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Avoiding making eye contact or asking where someone is from are signs of racism says Oxford University

microaggressions
From Daily Mail: Avoiding making eye contact with someone or asking where they are originally from have been deemed as racist micro-aggressions in a newsletter issued by Oxford University.  The institution’s Equality and Diversity Unit states these two common behaviours could potentially cause the listener ‘mental ill-health’. 
The Trinity term newsletter claims asking someone where they are ‘originally’ from implies that the questioner does not believe they are British.  The Trinity term newsletter also mentions ‘not speaking directly to people’ and ‘jokes drawing attention to someone’s difference’ as possible forms of everyday racism.
It says people doing these things are often ‘well-meaning’, but insists they are still reinforcing negative stereotypes and making people feel like they ‘do not belong’.
But Professor Frank Furedi, author of What’s Happened To The University, said the advice was ‘Orwellian’ and called on Oxford to ‘wake up to reality’.  He told MailOnline: ‘To go from simply stating someone is racist based on what they say to assume they are unconsciously racist is a very Orwellian turn. Microaggressions empower the accuser to say that it doesn’t matter what you intend by that look, I just know by the look of your eyes you are racist.
‘It is a very insidious way of thinking. Universities used to understand the reality that humans are complex.  It would be nice if Oxford could wake up to reality.’
Oxford University said the advice was part of an attempt to fight discrimination and encourage equality of opportunity. Students at the university recently took part in a campaign called ‘I, too, am Oxford’, to raise awareness of unconscious racism.
At one college, Pembroke, students are advised by their representatives to report ‘macro and microaggressions’ to a welfare officer. She will then deal with the issue by ‘mediation with the other party’ or ‘through the harassment policy’.
Professor Furedi said giving advice on avoiding microaggressions happens at ‘virtually every’ university in the USA, but is fairly new to the UK. The Emeritus Professor of Sociology at Kent University urged British students to resist the trend, adding: ‘A minority of students make it their own cause. ‘But there are usually a lot of people who think it is stupid but they acquiesce to it and eventually the influence of these ideas becomes more prominent.’
An Oxford University spokesman told MailOnline: ‘The Equality and Diversity Unit works with University bodies to ensure that the University’s pursuit of excellence goes hand in hand with freedom from discrimination and equality of opportunity.
‘The newsletter is one way of advising and supporting staff towards achieving these aims.’
The row comes two months after a Cambridge college was accused of ‘cultural misrepresentation’ by students after serving ‘Jamaican stew’ and ‘Tunisian rice’.  Students argued the dishes served at Pembroke College were not authentic to countries they were described to be from, The Sunday Times reported.
The original complainant said: ‘I’m used to as a minority student being constantly invalidated when flagging up specific issues but if people feel their cultures are misrepresented they have the right to address this. Micro-aggressions are a reality of the everyday exist­ence of many people of colour.’
DCG

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