Tag Archives: Ohio State University

Religious people live 4 years longer than atheists

Four days ago, I posted about church attendance reducing suicide risk by half.
Here is more evidence that being a Christian is good for our health, both mental and physical.

The lonely world of atheists

A study by a team of researchers found a surprising correlation between longevity and religious faith: religious people live up to four years longer than atheists.
Published on June 13, 2018 in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science, the article “Does Religion Stave Off the Grave? Religious Affiliation in One’s Obituary and Longevity” was authored by:

  1. Laura Wallace, the lead author, is a doctoral student of psychology at Ohio State University (OSU).
  2. Rebecca Anthony, who is in her final year of medical school at OSU.
  3. Dr. Christian End, associate professor of psychology at Xavier University.
  4. Dr. Baldwin Way, associate professor of psychology at OSU.

As summarized by a press release from Ohio State University, the study employed two samples of obituaries;

  1. A first sample of 505 obituaries published in Iowa’s Des Moines Register  in January and February 2012, showed that people with religious affiliations lived 9.45 years longer than atheists. The gap in longevity shrank to 6.48 years when gender and marital status were taken into account.
  2. A second sample of 1,096 obituaries from 42 major U.S. cities published on newspaper websites between August 2010 and August 2011, found that people whose obits mentioned a religious affiliation lived an average of 5.64 years longer than those whose obits did not. That gap shrank to 3.82 years after gender and marital status were considered.

The researchers tried to account for these likely explanatory (or “contaminating”) factors:

  • Many studies have shown that people who volunteer and participate in social groups tend to live longer than others. As an example, attending church regularly increases the odds of becoming friends with other attendees. Wallace et al. combined data from both samples and determined that volunteerism and social engagement only partly accounted for the greater longevity of religious people. Wallace said: “We found that volunteerism and involvement in social organizations only accounted for a little less than one year of the longevity boost that religious affiliation provided. There’s still a lot of the benefit of religious affiliation that this can’t explain.”
  • What about the importance that many religions place on conformity to community values and norms? The researchers found that in highly religious cities where conformity was important, religious people tended to live longer than non-religious people.

Other possible explanatory factors:

  • The researchers allowed that the longevity effect of religious affiliation may have to do with the rules and norms of many religions restricting unhealthy practices such as alcohol, drug use and sexual promiscuity.
  • In addition, Dr. Way said, “many religions promote stress-reducing practices that may improve health, such as gratitude, prayer or meditation.”
  • Way also admitted that the study could not control for important factors related to longevity such as race and health behaviors.

Nevertheless, lead author Wallace said that overall, the study provides additional support to the growing number of studies showing that religion does have a positive effect on health.
See also:

~Eowyn

Please follow and like us:
error130
Tweet 20
fb-share-icon20

Share and Enjoy !

0Shares
0 0 0
 

"Higher" education: Ohio State core class teaches Christians are dumber than atheists

OSU-psych-question-2014
Campus Reform: An Ohio State University (OSU) class has apparently determined another fundamental difference between Christians and atheists: their IQ points.
An online quiz from the school’s Psychology 1100 class, provided to Campus Reform via tip, asked students to pick which scenario they found most likely given that “Theo has an IQ of 100 and Aine has an IQ of 125.” The correct answer? “Aine is an atheist, while Theo is a Christian.”
According to a student in the class who wished to remain anonymous, the question was a part of an online homework quiz. Students were required to complete a certain amount of quizzes throughout the course but were encouraged to finish all of them in order to prep for the final exam.
“I understand that colleges have a liberal spin on things so it didn’t surprise me to see the question, which is a sad thing,” the student told Campus Reform in a phone interview. “But how can you really measure which religion has a higher IQ?”
Psychology 1100 is a general education requirement class which can primarily be taught by an undergraduate teacher’s assistant.
While the student said the quizzes were based on the textbook used in class, an OSU employee in the psychology department who wished to remain nameless said quizzes are oftentimes created by the teacher’s assistant.
The employee added that the psychology department is “very open to talking with students” if they are worried about grading or a question on an exam.
OSU explicitly prohibits discrimination on campus against any individual based on “age, ancestry, color, disability, gender identity or expression, genetic information, military status, national origin, race, religion, sex, sexual orientation, HIV status, or veteran status,” according to the university’s policy.
“Colleges will tolerate pretty much any religion other than Christianity,” the OSU student said. “If colleges really want to give everyone a fair shot, they should stay away from making comments about any religion.”
Dr. Mike Adams, an outspoken conservative Christian professor at the University of North Carolina, said “every group is protected from offensive speech on campus except for conservative Christians.”
Adams also added that applying this principle to other types of groups would be taboo on college campuses. “So would it be permissible to force blacks to take a class teaching that blacks would have a lower IQ than white people?” he said in an interview with Campus Reform.
This isn’t the first time a researcher has used psychology to suggest those with more social conservative or even religious values have lower IQ scores. A 2011 study published in Psychological Science claimed that “lower general intelligence…in childhood predicts greater racism in adulthood, and this effect was largely mediated via conservative ideology.”
“When science arose, it arose in the West and it did so in Christian nations. It did so because Christianity—with its assumptions about an orderly universe and its emphasis on obtaining knowledge as a cultural value—[was] necessary for science to develop and to flourish,” Adams said. “That anti-Christian bigots use science to attack Christianity is more than Pharisaic hypocrisy. It is deeply ingrained institutional bigotry.”
OSU declined to comment to Campus Reform for this story.
Well, OSU is just being good little commies after all:
goals

  • #17: Get control of the schools.
  • #27: Discredit the Bible and emphasize the need for intellectual maturity (which is ironic since this generation is self-absorbed [#me!] and has postponed maturation).

DCG

Please follow and like us:
error130
Tweet 20
fb-share-icon20

Share and Enjoy !

0Shares
0 0 0
 

Media whores conceal empty seats at Obama rally

Yesterday was the official start of Obama’s re-election campaign. The chosen site was a sports stadium at Ohio State University (OSU) in Columbus.
Even before he arrived, the slavish MSM were in over drive. ABC News reported Saturday morning that the Obama 2012 campaign expected “overflow” crowds.
Mark Landler of The New York Times was at OSU. He likened the rally to “a concert by an aging rock star” and described how “The crowd of 14,000 supporters erupted into cheers and chants of ‘Four more years!’”
Here’s the New York Times‘ photo of the OSU campaign rally:

Wow, what a jam-packed stadium! Impressive, isn’t it?
What the New York Times didn’t tell you is this:
The picture is deceptive. Only 70% of the stadium’s 20,000 seats were occupied. To make the rally appear more attended than it was, event organizers moved people from the stage’s surrounding seats to the arena’s floor to depict a better crowd to television cameras.
Luckily, Mitt Romney’s deputy press secretary Ryan Williams was in the audience at the OSU rally, and tweeted another view of the same stadium:

Source: Buzzfeed

That’s why we call them Media Whores.

H/t beloved fellow Tina.
~Eowyn

Please follow and like us:
error130
Tweet 20
fb-share-icon20

Share and Enjoy !

0Shares
0 0 0