Tag Archives: NRA

Seattle-King County Public Health want doctors to be more inquisitive into patient firearm access/ownership

guns

On Tuesday, Seattle-King County Public Health published a statement with their intent to decrease gun violence. The blog was posted by Dr. Jeff Duchin, Health Officer for Public Health – Seattle & King County.

About Dr. Duchin: “Jeff served for over 15 years as Chief of the Public Health’s Communicable Disease Epidemiology & Immunization Section. Jeff trained as a Medical Epidemiologist in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) after which he completed the CDC’s Preventive Medicine Residency program.”

See his full bio here.

The doctor is on Twitter. Here’s a few of his tweets:

The blog post by Seattle-King County Public Health talks about suicide and firearm-related injuries including statistics, deaths  and costs to taxpayers. Read the full blog post here.

Here are excerpts from the agency’s new pledge:

“For that reason, Public Health is joining with leading medical professional associations to form a new collaboration with a renewed commitment to decrease firearm-related injury and deaths by working together and using a public health approach.

Prevention is the core of a public health approach, and firearm injuries and deaths can be prevented. We must address prevention of firearm-related injuries in the same way we do for other types of injuries, poisonings, and infectious and chronic diseases, using a public health approach that includes:

  • Screening to identify patients with risk factors for firearm-related injury
  • Educating patients and families about risk factors, firearm safety and injury prevention as we do for other diseases and causes of injury – gun owners and non-gun owners alike understand the importance of firearm safety
  • Gathering data and conducting research on risk and protective factors for firearm related injury and death in order to make evidence-based recommendations and strategies
  • Promoting the adoption of successful prevention strategies, including those addressing upstream drivers of violence, such as childhood abuse, neglect and trauma, poverty, substance use disorders, disrupted families and communities, and being a victim of violence
  • Fostering multidisciplinary and community collaborations with stakeholders interested in reducing firearm-related injury and death, including gun-owners

The medical community has an important role in this work.  You can read our joint statement, which includes a description of our approach and examples of actions healthcare providers can take to reduce firearm-related injury and death, at http://www.kingcounty.gov/firearm-injuries-ph. 

(WARNING: I tried clicking on the link to read the document and each time I did my computer froze. Not sure if it’s just my computer or the Public Health link.)

This collaboration among healthcare provider professional organizations is the first of many steps local and statewide medical professionals can take together to reduce firearm injury and death in our communities. We invite other healthcare professional organizations to join us by endorsing our statement and/or participating in our future work.”

MyNorthwest.com has some more details:

“Those efforts include joining with experts at Harborview Injury Prevention and Research Center, Washington State Medical Association, King County Medical Society, and other state and local medical groups to recommend more screening and education for patients of all ages, including everything from identifying risk factors to talking to them about the importance of safely storing guns.

It recommends medical professionals should also respect beliefs of lawful firearm owners in order to effectively communicate. Also, to use healthcare providers who are also gun owners to provide leadership and knowledge on the issue.


I wonder if any of the “data” gathered by doctors could be used in the future to determine if compliance is being achieved with Mayor Durkan’s proposed new gun legislation?

DCG

Vogue magazine asks, “Should we still let children play with toy guns?”

It’s the “Classic Mother BB Gun Block.”

Pro-tip for the women cited in this article: We have THOUSANDS of strict gun laws already on the books. The problem is enforcement and those darn criminals who don’t obey them.

And if you’re interested in teaching your child about proper firearm safety instead of an irrational fear, there are LOTS of resources available. For example, see here, here, here, here, here and here.

From Yahoo (originally from Vogue): Over the weekend, on a party supplies run at Flying Tiger, the charming Danish discount store, my 4-year-old daughter’s eyes sparkled at the sight of a neon-color water gun. “Can I have that?” she asked—the same question she’d repeated at the sight of the modeling clay and princess crowns and silly straws.

I wavered for a beat. I’d come of age in the late ’80s and ’90s—the height of the backyard Super Soaker battle. And before that water gun became the hottest ticket at Toys “R” Us, my brother and I had wielded tiny green plastic water pistols filled and refilled with rudimentary plugs, sneakily shooting each other in the eyes. I remember all of this as pure, absurd fun.

“No,” I told my daughter, and briskly steered her on.

I offered no explanation in the moment—and I hadn’t really turned the question over in my head before—but my gut gave me my answer: that I didn’t want to introduce her to this or any other gun in a world that already seemed to be teeming with them in movies and video games, on TV and, most of all, on the news. Her fleeting interest in the toy gun was innocent, but, sadly, my view of it no longer was.

The water gun fights my brother and I used to have in the summer were from another era, maybe even another world—before Columbine and Parkland; Orlando and Sutherland Springs; and before these much-covered mass shootings rightfully reminded the public of the regularly occurring violence in lower socioeconomic and minority communities.

Back then, guns might have been just toys; now, it’s impossible for me not to see them as charged with the trauma of recent events.

I considered that same question again today—should we let our children play with toy guns at a time when the U.S. is grappling with the impact of gun violence?—when I saw the pictures of Prince George holding a rather realistic-looking black toy gun at an English polo match over the weekend. Part of the debate over toy guns has hinged on distinguishing them, clearly, as toys—so as never to be mistaken for the real thing. There are state laws, including one in New York, requiring toy guns be brightly colored, as opposed to black, aluminum, or silver. Perhaps for this reason, the photos stood out: to some eyes, the prince’s looked eerily like a real pistol.

“I gasped when I saw the photos,” an American friend said on Facebook.

And she has a reason to: America has a gun violence homicide rate that is 25 times higher than that of other developed countries, according to Everytown for Gun Safety; we outrank all other countries in the number of mass shootings that occur here; we own an estimated half of all civilian guns worldwide. A child wielding a toy gun in the U.K., where firearms are much harder to obtain, arouses a different sense of shock or unease than they might in America, though no less alarming—remember the brouhaha when Pippa Middleton’s friend pointed a firearm out of their convertible at a paparazzi?

There’s also the matter of who’s holding the toy gun. “The photo of Prince George juxtaposed with the story of Tamir Rice, a young black boy killed by police in Ohio because he had a toy gun in hand is an important part of the racial and white supremacy dynamics at play here,” Erika Soto Lamb, the founding and former head of communications for Everytown and Moms Demand Action for Gun Safety and a mother of two sons, ages 5 and 7, told Vogue. “It’s not safe for a black child in America to play with toy guns.”

Soto Lamb is a Texas native who was raised around real guns; she grew up playing cops and robbers and revering A Christmas Story—the irreverent classic in which mischievous young Ralphie Parker dreams of his very own BB gun. But she does not allow her two sons to play with toy guns of any kind. While at Everytown and Moms Demand Action, “when my life was a daily deluge of news stories about gun violence in America, and working with mothers whose children had been killed, it was simply untenable to come home and hand my children guns to play with,” Soto Lamb said.

When I began asking other parents today about kids and toy guns, many echoed her uneasiness. “My daughter is just 3, but I don’t think a gun can be an innocent toy in this day and age,” Anna Davies, a fellow writer in Jersey City, New Jersey, told me. “It’s much easier to just not have them in our lives.”

Another friend said she was “uncomfortable” when her 5-year-old daughter recently received a toy water gun in a birthday party goodie bag. One mother stealthily returned a “machine-gun” toy loaded with foam pellets that her son received at his own birthday party. “It was designed to look like the real deal,” she said. “I was so horrified, I immediately stashed it away while he was busy tearing into his other gifts.”

I can hear the other side now: that parents denying their kids toy guns are overthinking this. That a toy is still just a toy. But if Barbies arguably possess the power to body shame little girls, and princesses can mess with their sense of independence, then can’t guns, even if just subliminally, sanction violence? “I believe we have a cultural problem with guns in this country, and I don’t want to normalize the use of them,” Kathy Healy Champion, a mother of three in Connecticut, said. She doesn’t allow her children to play with toy guns. “I see it as a step in the right direction.”

After Sandy Hook, Soto Lamb says she began to view A Christmas Story through a different lens: “I realized that America’s problem with gun violence goes deeper than any laws, there is a cultural shift that needs to happen,” she said. “We give them blocks to inspire them to be builders, we give them paint to inspire artistic expression . . . what are we feeding our children, in the metaphorical sense, when we hand them toy guys to play with?

It doesn’t have to be a real gun to spark debate: According to Apple, Google, Facebook, Microsoft, and Twitter, even emoji guns carry a certain charge that doesn’t necessarily belong in our texts or tweets: all of those companies scrapped their original gun emojis in favor of “water guns.” The TSA—Transportation Security Administration—recommends toy guns be packed with checked baggage; it bans “squirt guns, Nerf guns, toy swords, or other items that resemble realistic firearms or weapons.”

For some parents, the question of how to handle toy guns is ongoing—some allow just water guns and only of the bright-colored variety. Others have nuanced rules—that toy guns should never be pointed at people or used to pretend-kill someone. (But, then again, that’s usually the point of a gun, whether real or fake.) Some parents say the decision isn’t easy—one mother reluctantly allows her sons to partake in paintball gunning, so as not to make them feel left out among friends. The hardest part for Soto Lamb is banning water guns. “Water guns are really so fun, but let’s be honest, Super Soakers are basically assault weapon–style water guns,” she said. “We make do with water blasters”—long tubes with no trigger—“and water balloons.”

Several parents told me their concerns about toy guns tend to get dwarfed by their worry over real gun violence. Responding to some online backlash about Prince George’s toy gun, Davies said, “I wish the outrage would continue to be directed at the NRA, not Prince George and the royal family. Maybe if we lived in a society that had strict gun laws, our toddlers could also play with pretend guns. I think it’s actually something to aspire to—let’s become a society where guns are just as fantastical as lightsabers.”

DCG

Parkland students plan bus tour to target places where NRA “bought and paid for politicians”

emma gonzalez tweet

Be sure to vocalize your true agenda while on the road, kids…

There were record gun sales in April, the second month in a row.

The NRA has reached 6,000,000 members.

The NRA had record attendance at their annual convention in Dallas last month.

The NRA broke a 15-year fundraising record in April.

Donations to the NRA PAC tripled after the #GunControlNow crowd started targeting the NRA.

But hey, you kids keep doing your anti-Second Amendment thing. Hope to see you soon in Oklahoma!

From USA Today: A group of students-turned-activists from Florida’s Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School will be hitting the road next week on a nationwide bus tour aimed at educating voters — and encouraging them to actually vote to end gun violence.

“We’re going to places where the NRA has bought and paid for politicians who refuse to take simple steps to save our lives,” the March for Our Lives leaders said in a statement. The group will visit communities affected by gun violence “to meet fellow survivors and use our voices to amplify theirs.”

The March for Our Lives Road to Change will launch June 12 in Illinois, where the group will join the Peace March led by students from Chicago’s St. Sabina Academy. Cameron Kasky, one of the Florida group’s leaders, said Monday the two-month tour will make at least 75 stops in more than 20 states.

A separate tour will make stops in each of Florida’s 27 congressional districts.

“We can fix the political system,” Kasky said. “Our generation and the many generations that are helping us can change the game.”

The March for Our Lives drew millions of people to rallies across the nation and around the world demanding responsible gun laws. Its leaders included Kasky and several other Stoneman Douglas students who rose to national prominence in the days after a Valentine’s Day shooting rampage at the school killed 17 students and staff.

The last midterm elections, in 2014, drew the lowest turnout since World War II, Kasky said. He noted that 4 million teens will turn 18 this year.

“We are encouraging people around the country to educate themselves on their vote, to get out there and turn voting into more of an act of patriotism than a chore,” Kasky said.

The announcement came one day after graduation ceremonies honored the senior class, including four members slain in the attack — Nicholas Dworet, Joaquin Oliver, Meadow Pollack and Carmen Schentrup. Surprise commencement speaker Jimmy Fallon urged graduates to move forward and “don’t let anything stop you.”

DCG

Seattle mayor proposes new gun legislation that includes safe lock storage

stoopid

How will the chief of police know WHO to survey to determine if compliance is being achieved?

From MyNorthwest.com: Mayor Jenny Durkan is proposing new Seattle gun control legislation to tighten regulations around safe storage of firearms. It will also penalize gun owners who fail to report lost or stolen guns, or if their firearms are misused by an “unauthorized user.”

“The level of gun violence in our communities is not normal, and we can never think it is inevitable,” Mayor Durkan said. “We – and especially our children – should not have to live like this. With Congress in the grip of the D.C. gun lobby and too many state legislatures failing to act, our cities must lead the way – and we must all continue to demand action that saves lives.”

The proposal is being sent to the city council for consideration. It requires that guns are safely stored while not under the control of the owner or lawfully authorized user. It will also increase civil penalties for failure to report a firearm that is lost or stolen, or is improperly used. Violation of the regulations will result in a civil infraction. The proposal states:

  • Safe storage: Guns should be stored in a locked container, and rendered as unusable to any person other than the owner or authorized user.
  • Unauthorized access prevention: It will be a civil infraction if a minor, at-risk, or prohibited person obtains a firearm when the owner should have reasonably known they would have access to it.
  • Violation of the safe-storage law, or the unauthorized access regulation could result in a fine between $500 and $1,000.
  • If a prohibited or at-risk person, or a minor obtains a firearm and uses it to commit a crime, injure or kill someone (including themselves), the gun owner could be fined up to $10,000.
  • If a civil case results from a minor, at-risk, or prohibited person accessing a gun, it will be “prima facie evidence” — meaning fact unless proven otherwise — that the owner is negligent.

The new gun law will go into effect 180 days after it passes and Mayor Durkan signs it.

The chief of police will have one year to conduct a survey to determine levels of compliance. The city auditor will monitor the law’s influence on gun injuries and deaths in Seattle.

The legislation was drafted in partnership with Councilmember Lorena González.

“Simply put: If more gun owners lock up their firearms, it will reduce accidental firearm injuries and deaths, help prevent youth suicide, and reduce access to guns among youth who have no legal right to purchase firearms,” González said. “I look forward to championing this common-sense, public health approach through my public safety committee in the coming weeks.”

The mayor’s office says that it was developed after speaking with gun owners, safety advocates, and community members.

“The roots of gun violence are complex, but we know that unsecured, unsafely stored guns help fuel this crisis of violence because they are more likely to cause tragic accidents, fall into the wrong hands, or be used in suicides,” Durkan said. “Requiring that gun owners safely store their guns can help make our communities safer places to live.”

Read the rest of the story here.

DCG

Paul Allen backing initiative to raise minimum age for firearm purchase in Washington state

paul allen

Wonder if Paul Allen read all 30 pages of the initiative he’s throwing his money at…

I’m not surprised this is happening in Washington State. If this initiative passes, it will no doubt be challenged in court.

From Seattle Times: With an assist from two deep-pocketed allies, the Alliance for Gun Responsibility on Monday announced it had raised nearly $3 million for its latest Washington state ballot measure to further regulate firearms.

Microsoft co-founder and philanthropist Paul Allen and venture capitalist Nick Hanauer said they are giving $1 million each to the Alliance’s campaign to get Initiative 1639 onto the November election ballot.

The campaign hasn’t yet started gathering the signatures it needs by July because of three legal challenges against it, including one by the National Rifle Association, Alliance spokeswoman Katy Klein said.

The initiative comes after the latest string of mass killings, including the February shooting at a Parkland, Florida, high school, that killed 17 people and re-energized advocates for stricter regulations of so-called assault weapons. A shooting last Friday left 10 people dead at a Texas high school.

While gun-regulation advocates this year pushed a few new laws through the state Legislature — including a ban on bump stocks, which can make  a semi-automatic rifle fire much like an automatic weapon — they could not find the votes for more sweeping regulations.

Enter I-1639, which among other things would raise the minimum age to purchase a semi-automatic weapon to 21 and require enhanced background checks, training and waiting periods to obtain those firearms.

The proposal would also require gun owners to keep firearms secured at home. Gun owners could face misdemeanor or felony charges in certain circumstances if they allow someone prohibited from obtaining a weapon access to a firearm.

In a tweet Monday, Allen announced his $1 million donation to the initiative campaign, which he called “a reasonable and necessary measure that will improve the safety of our schools and our communities …”

“I hope people throughout the state will support the campaign, so that we can qualify and pass this important initiative into law,” Allen said.

Hanauer and his wife gave another $1 million, according to a tweet by Hanauer and a spokeswoman for the Alliance.

Read the rest of the story here.

The “among other things” are described in the 30-page initiative. I’ve read through the initiative and it’s a doozy. The devil is in the details:

Sec. 3 Enhanced Background Checks (starting on page 3):

(2) In addition to the other requirements of this chapter, no dealer may deliver a semiautomatic assault rifle to the purchasers until:

(a) The purchaser provide proof that he or she has completed a recognized firearm safety training program within the last five years that, at a minimum, includes instruction on: (continues and lists, among other things, suicide prevention, secure gun storage, safe handling, etc.)

(b) The dealer is notified in writing by (i) the chief of police or the sheriff of the jurisdiction in which the purchaser resides that the purchaser is eligible to possess a firearm under RCW 9.41.040 and that the application to purchase is approved by the chief of police or sheriff; or (ii) the state that the purchaser is eligible to possess a firearm under RCW 9.41.010, as provided in subsection (3) (b) of this section; or

(c) The requirements or time periods in RCW 9.41.092 have been satisfied.

Sec. 4 Waiting Period (starting on page 9):

(1) Except as otherwise provided in this chapter and except for semiautomatic assault rifles under subsection (2) of this section, a licensed dealer may not deliver any firearms to a purchaser or transferee until the earlier of:

(b) Ten business days have elapsed from the date the licensed dealer requested the background check. However, for sales and transfers of pistols if the purchaser or transferee does not have a valid permanent Washington driver’s license or state identification card or has not been a resident of the state for the previous consecutive ninety days, then the time period in this subsection shall be extended from ten business days to sixty days.

(2) Except as otherwise  provided in this chapter, a licensed dealer may not deliver a semiautomatic assault rifle to a purchaser or transferee until ten business days have elapsed from the date of the purchase application or, in the case of a transfer, ten business days have elapsed from the date of background check is initiatied.

Sec. 5. Secure Gun Storage (starting on page 10):

(1) A person who stores or leaves a firearm in a location where the person knows, or reasonably should know, that a prohibited person may gain access to the firearms:

(Goes on to list those who are prohibited possessors.)

(6) Nothing in this section mandates how or where a firearm must be stored.

Sec. 6. Availability of Secure Gun Storage (starting on page 11):

(1) When selling or transferring any firearms, every dealer shall offer to sell or give the purchaser or transferee a secure gun storage device, or a trigger lock or similar device that is designed to prevent the unauthorized use or discharge of the firearm.

(2) Every store, shop, or sales outlet where firearms are sold, that is registered as a dealer in firearms with the department of licensing, shall conspicuously post, in a prominent location so that all patrons may take notice, the following warning sign, to be provided by the department of licensing, in block letters at least one inch in height:

WARNING: YOU MAY FACE CRIMINAL PROSECUTION IF YOU STORE OR LEAVE AN UNSECURED FIREARM WHERE A PERSON WHO IS PROHIBITED FROM POSSESSING FIREARMS CAN AND DOES OBTAIN POSSESSION(noted twice in all caps)

Sec. 7 RCW 9.41.094(Waiver of Confidentiality) and 2018 c 201 s 6004 are each amended to read as follows (starting on page 12)

A signed application to purchase a pistol or semiautomatic assault rifle shall constitute a waiver of confidentiality and written request that the health care authority, mental health institutions, and other health care facilities release, to an inquiring court or law enforcement agency, information relevant to the applicant’s eligibility to purchase a pistol or semiautomatic assault rifle to an inquiring court or law enforcement agency.

Sec. 8 RCW 9.41.097(Supplying information on persons purchasing pistols or applying for concealed pistol licenses)and 2018 c 201 s 6005 are each amended to read as follows (starting on page 13)

(1) The health care authority, mental health institution, and other health care facilities shall, upon request of a court, law enforcement agency, or the state, supply such relevant information as is necessary to determine the eligibility of a person to possess a firearm or to be issues a concealed pistol license under RCW 9.41.070 or to purchase a pistol or semiautomatic assault rifle under RCW 9.41.090.

Definitions (starting on page 24)

(24) Secure Gun Storage means:

(a) A locked box, gun safe, or other secure locked storage space that is designed to prevent unauthorized use or discharge of a firearm; and (b) the act of keeping an unloaded firearm stored by such means.

(25) “Semiautomatic Assault Rifle”means any rifle which utilizes a portion of the energy of a firing cartridge to extract the fired cartridge case and chamber the next round, and which requires a separate pull of the trigger to fire each cartridge.

What do you know… their definition of “semiautomatic assault rifle” seems to describe all semiauto rifles as “assault” rifles.

I told you the devil was in the details…

Read the whole initiative here.

DCG

Esquire magazine: We really do want to take your guns

The Deep State’s relentless false-flag mass shootings are working.

A major magazine has come forth calling for gun confiscation.

Founded in 1933 and published by Hearst Corporation, Esquire is a U.S. men’s magazine with 31 international editions in such countries as the UK, Mexico, Middle East, Russia, China and Japan.

Dave Holmes is Esquire‘s Los Angeles-based Editor-at-Large.

In a May 18, 2018 op/ed, “Okay, Now I Actually Do Want to Take Your Guns,” Holmes writes:

Hey there, NRA:

Listen, I know the moments after a gunman opens fire in a school are hectic for you. You have to get your talking points together, you have to mentally prepare to debate a traumatized yet sensible child, you have to look at yourself in the mirror and practice saying that more guns would have made the situation less deadly. It’s a busy time! And since we are always either in the moments after or the moments before a mass shooting, you’re pretty much always busy, I have noticed!

Anyway, I just wanted to drop you a line and let you know that I now actually do want to take your guns.

All of your guns.

Right now.

It wasn’t always this way. I have responsible gun owners in my family. I’ve never been a fan of shooting at things myself, but guns sure do seem to have brought joy into the lives of some people I love, and as long as they were stored properly, I never had a problem with them being around. I believed that we should place a hurdle or two between a psychopath and an AR-15, but that’s about as ardent as I got. Live and let live, that was my policy. Even with death machines.

That has all changed. And you changed it.

All along, as American life has gotten deadlier, as our kids have gotten less safe in their schools, you have had the opportunity to work with the vast majority of Americans who support the sensible reform of our gun laws. You have had the chance to preserve your own rights as we work together to keep our gun regulations in step with gun technology. You haven’t.

All along, there have been opportunities for sensible, incremental changes. This year alone, we could have banned the manufacture of bump stocks, which turn semi-automatic weapons into automatic ones. We could have raised the minimum age for gun ownership from 18 to 21, or instate a national minimum age for long-gun ownership. We haven’t, largely because you have bought our government.

What you have done is double down. What you’ve done is convince your members that the occasional school shooting, the odd literal slaughter of innocents, is an unfortunate but inevitable quirk of American life, a thing that is necessary to preserve freedom. You have taken to our television screens to tell us that the world is an apocalyptic hellscape, and that the only way to be safe from gun violence is to stock our homes with guns.

You pushed legislation that cut funding from the Centers for Disease Control for research on gun safety in America. Research that might conclude that fewer guns would mean fewer gun deaths, which leaves us with…no meaningful research on gun violence in America. Our ongoing studies on car safety have made cars, roads and highways safer—not without risk, but safer—yet no comparable studies can be done on guns.

Here’s what you get for that.

The young people of America are now expecting to witness gun violence in their schools. They are sitting in trigonometry waiting for the other shoe to drop, except the shoe can shoot 400 rounds a minute. That’s the result of all your hard work. There’s your prize. Stand up and take it! . . . .

This morning, as an active shooter situation unfolded in his town, this guy decided to show up on the scene with a MAGA hat, a full-size American flag and a pistol on his hip, to…I guess attempt to be a hero? This is what your relentless fear-mongering gets us all: an adult human being taking a gun to a school to be helpful.

I was stunned and sad after Parkland. I was heartened by the efforts of the young people who watch their friends get murdered in front of them. I watched you make nice with them on CNN and then, behind their backs, call them terrorists. And then this morning I watched the same goddamn thing happen again, only this time at a high school in Santa Fe, Texas, where at least ten people are dead. As though all of the marching and organizing and common-sense talking had never happened. As though this ever growing pile of young bodies is worth nothing.

So now I’m angry. Now I’m finished trying to reason with you. So now I, a guy who was ambivalent about guns just a few years ago, want to take your guns away. All of them. I want to take them all and melt them down and shape them into a giant sphere and then push it at you so you have to run away from it like Indiana Jones for the rest of your lives. I want Ted Nugent to roam the halls of his gunless house, sighing wearily until he dies. I want to end this thing once and for all, so that all of you who have prioritized the sale of guns over the lives of children have to sit quietly and think about what you’ve done. God help me, I want to take all of your guns out of your hands, by myself, right now.

It won’t happen, of course. So let’s meet in the middle. Let’s meet at…literally anything.

It’s happening. We tried it your way, and it really did not work. The ground is shifting. Get ready.

1 in 3 Americans own guns. Holmes has better get going with his gun confiscation scheme, beginning with these people:

Hillary Clinton gun-control hypocriteNY Gov. Andrew Cuomo with armed guards

H/t FOTM‘s Stovepipe

See also:

~Eowyn

Emma Gonzalez: If you want to shoot assault weapons, go serve your f*cking country

According to Emma an AR-15 isn’t “imperative.”

Set aside the fact that an AR-15 is not an assault weapon. And set aside her fantasy that civilians should not own any of these weapons. And set aside the Second Amendment…

Here’s several reasons why an AR-15 may be imperative:

But hey Emma, you and Media Hogg keep on talking all you want. You’re doing a bang up job for the NRA:

h/t Weasel Zippers

DCG