Tag Archives: North Korea

Chilling video of a political assassination in 2.33 seconds

Kim Jong-nam was the eldest son of the late North Korean dictator Kim Jong-il, who died in 2011 and who himself had succeeded his father Kim Il-sung in the bizarre hereditary dynasty of communist North Korea.

Jong-nam had been the heir apparent to his father until he fell out of favor in 2001 after a failed attempt to visit Tokyo Disneyland by entering Japan with a false passport. Jong-nam was exiled from North Korea in 2003, becoming an occasional critic of his family’s regime and an advocate for reform, while he lived a life of comfort and gambling on the island of Macao as his countrymen died from starvation. Jong-nam’s younger paternal half-brother, the ruthless Kim Jong-un, was named heir apparent and became leader after Jong-il’s death in 2011.

On February 13, 2017, Kim Jong-nam was assassinated via poison by two women at Kuala Lumpur International Airport, Malaysia.

Japan’s Fuji TV obtained and aired the chilling closed-circuit security footage of the assassination.

The footage begins with Kim — carrying a black backpack over his right shoulder and dressed in light-blue jeans, a sport coat and a cap — arriving alone at the airport’s crowded departures hall shortly before 9 a.m. on Feb. 13. Police said he had been in Malaysia for about a week, and had intended to take a 10:50 a.m. AirAsia flight back to his home in Macau.

He stops to look up at the flight schedules, then walks to a nearby self-check-in kiosk.

The next scene is blurry, showing two women approaching Kim. One woman, identified by police to be Siti Aisyah, 25, an Indonesian masseuse at a spa in Kuala Lumpur, approaches Kim on the left and catches his attention. The second woman, in white top, identified by police to be a Vietnamese named Doan Thi Huong, 28, attacks Kim from behind, wrapping both arms around his head and holding a cloth over his face.

Huong’s contact with Kim lasted 2.33 seconds, according a timer added to the video compilation. The two women quickly walk away in opposite directions. Kim’s backpack slips off from his shoulder and he stumbles backward. He stands motionless for several seconds.

Kuala Lumpur police told The Wall Street Journal that the video of the assault is blurry because a camera closer to the scene wasn’t working. How convenient. /sarc

A subsequent clip, of better quality from a different camera, shows Kim walking quickly to the nearby customer-service desk. There he tells an airport employee that two women had just wiped a wet cloth on his face, and that he feels dizzy. The airport worker escorts him out to the hallway where Kim speaks animatedly with the police and repeatedly motions toward his face. A police officer and an airport employee escort Kim, now moving less steadily, to a small, glass-fronted airport medical clinic.

An unspecified amount of time passes. The next clip shows Kim on a stretcher at the clinic, being moved. Police said he had a seizure. Kim died en route to Putrajaya Hospital.

Here’s a video with a CGI reenactment of the assassination:

According to Zerohedge, Malaysia’s police said they believe Kim was poisoned during the assault, but are awaiting confirmation from autopsy results. Police arrested the two assailants, Aisyah and Huong, and detained them for a week. Neither however has been charged. Police also arrested a North Korean man and a Malaysian man suspected of being involved in the assault, and say they are searching for others, including several North Korean men.

suspects-in-kim-jong-nams-assassination

South Korea Defense Ministry spokesman Jeong Joon-hee said Pyongyang is behind the death: “The government assumes that North Korea’s regime is behind the incident.”

~Eowyn

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Another Obama false flag: Cyber security experts say Sony hacking was an inside job

Sony Pictures Entertainment has reversed its prior decision to pull the movie The Interview, an action comedy about two American journalists (played by Seth Rogen and James Franco) who wrangled an interview with North Korea’s ruthless savage dictator Kim Jong Un, then assassinated Kim.

The Interview

Hackers who call themselves “Guardians of the Peace,” determined by federal investigators to be associated with the North Korea government, had hacked into Sony’s computers and leaked a trove of embarrassing emails. Then the hackers threatened to to carry out terrorist attacks against cinemas that screen The Interview, which originally was scheduled for release on December 25.

On Dec. 17, Sony buckled under pressure and took the unprecedented step of canceling the Dec. 25 release of the The Interview.

Obama and the F.B.I. accused North Korea of targeting Sony and pledged a “proportional response” just hours before North Korea’s Internet went dark without explanation.

But now Sony has reversed its decision.

The movie is being screened today in independent theaters across the United States. Beginning yesterday at 10 a.m. PT, the movie can also be downloaded from from Google Play, YouTube Movies, Xbox Video and the website SeetheInterview.com for $5.99, or $14.99 for an HD version.

Here’s a preview:

Sony’s reversal has led InfoWars to wonder if the whole thing is a marketing scam — “a cynical PR campaign from the start.”

Indeed, the New York Times reports:

A number of private security researchers are increasingly voicing doubts that the hack of Sony‘s computer systems was the work of North Korea…with some even likening the government’s claims to those of the Bush administration in the build-up to the Iraq war.

Fueling their suspicions is the fact that the [Obama] government based its findings, in large part, on evidence that it will not release, citing the ‘need to protect sensitive sources and methods.’ […]

“Essentially, we are being left in a position where we are expected to just take agency promises at face value,” Marc Rogers, a security researcher at CloudFlare, the mobile security company, wrote in a post Wednesday. “In the current climate, that is a big ask.”

Mr. Rogers, who doubles as the director of security operations for DefCon, an annual hacker convention, and others like Bruce Schneier, a prominent cryptographer and blogger, have been mining the meager evidence that has been publicly circulated, and argue that it is hardly conclusive.

For one, skeptics note that the few malware samples they have studied indicate the hackers routed their attack through computers all over the world. One of those computers, in Bolivia, had been used by the same group to hack targets in South Korea. But that computer, as well as others in Poland, Italy, Thailand, Singapore, Cyprus and the United States, were all freely available to anyone to use, which opens the list of suspects to anyone with an Internet connection and basic hacking skills.

For another, Sony’s attackers constructed their malware on computers configured with Korean language settings, but skeptics note that those settings could have been reset to deflect blame. They also note the attackers used commercial software wiping tools that could have been purchased by anyone.

They also point out that whoever attacked Sony had a keen understanding of its computer systems — the names of company servers and passwords were all hard-coded into the malware — suggesting the hackers were inside Sony before they launched their attack. Or it could even have been an inside job. […]

On Wednesday, one alternate theory emerged. Computational linguists at Taia Global, a cybersecurity consultancy, performed a linguistic analysis of the hackers’ online messages — which were all written in imperfect English — and concluded that based on translation errors and phrasing, the attackers are more likely to be Russian speakers than Korean speakers.

Such linguistic analysis is hardly foolproof. But the practice, known as stylometry, has been used to contest the authors behind some of history’s most disputed documents, from Shakespearean sonnets to the Federalist Papers.

[…] other private security researchers say their own research backs up the government’s claims. CrowdStrike, a California security firm that has been tracking the same group that attacked Sony since 2006, believes they are located in North Korea and have been hacking targets in South Korea for years.

But without more proof, skeptics are unlikely to simply demur to F.B.I. claims. “In the post-Watergate post-Snowden world, the USG can no longer simply say ‘trust us’,” Paul Rosenzweig, theDepartment of Homeland Security’s former deputy assistant secretary for policy, wrote on the Lawfare blog Wednesday. “Not with the U.S. public and not with other countries. Though the skepticism may not be warranted, it is real.”

In real life, Kim Jong Un, the obese grandson and son of North Korea’s previous dictators, Kim Il Sung and Kim Jong Il, lives a life of luxury and gluttony while his subjects starve to death. Kim the 3rd reportedly had his own uncle killed and fed to dogs.

See:

Update (Dec. 26, 2014):

Evidence is mounting that this Sony “hack” is another Obama admin. false flag.

1. Almost every cyber security expert now says the FBI is wrong: North Korea is not responsible for the hack; in fact, Pyongyang has denied it’s responsible. Instead, the hack most likely was a Sony inside job by someone named Lena. (Daily Mail) H/t FOTM’s CSM

2. The movie is panned by critics: The Interview received only an average 50% rating on Rotten Tomatoes.

3. Despite being panned by critics, but thanks to the mega publicity from the “hacking” and Sony’s initial withdrawal of the movie, The Interview played to packed cinemas across America on Christmas Day. (Daily Mail)

~Eowyn

Kim Jong-Un’s death scene in Sony’s axed movie “The Interview”

For North Korea’s bullying that resulted in Sony Pictures Entertainment pulling the movie The Interview from movie screens, see “North Korea bullies Hollywood; Sony wusses out; Obama useless“.

Since Sony, by buckling under Pyongyang’s threats, is willing to swallow $41 million to $55 million in lost revenue, Sony should just release the movie free online. That’s the best way to defeat North Korea’s bullying.

~Eowyn

North Korea bullies Hollywood; Sony wusses out; Obama useless

Kim Jong-UnHere’s looking at you, Dictator and uncle-killer Kim Jong Un!

I have no fondness for Hollywood, but we’re now in a new era when foreign governments like North Korea wield veto power over whether a Hollywood-made movie is screened.

The movie is Sony Pictures Entertainment’s The Interview, an “action comedy” flick starring Seth Rogen and James Franco as journalists instructed to assassinate North Korean leader Kim Jong-un (played by Randall Park) after successfully booking an interview with him.

The Interview

On June 25, 2014, Korean Central News Agency—the state-run news agency of North Korea — condemned the movie and promised a “decisive and merciless countermeasure” if The Interview were to be released, stating that “making and releasing a film that portrays an attack on our top-level leadership is the most blatant act of terrorism and war and will absolutely not be tolerated.”

In November 2014, the computer systems of parent company Sony Pictures Entertainment were hacked by a group that calls itself with no hint of irony “Guardians of Peace.” Federal investigators have confirmed that the group has ties to North Korea.

The North Korean hackers leaked several upcoming Sony films, as well as embarrassing emails in which producers bad-mouthed actors like Angelina Jolie (“minimally talented spoiled brat”) and Leonardo di Caprio, and made “racist” remarks about Barack Obama.

On December 16, 2014, the hackers raised their ante, threatening to carry out terrorist attacks against cinemas that screen The Interview, which originally was scheduled for release on December 25.

A day later, Sony buckled under the pressure.

From the AP, Dec. 17, 2014:

Under the threat of terrorist attacks from hackers and with the nation’s largest multiplex chains pulling the film from its screens, Sony Pictures Entertainment took the unprecedented step of canceling the Dec. 25 release of the The Interview.

The cancellation, announced Wednesday, was a startling blow to the Hollywood studio that has been shaken by hacker leaks and intimidations over the last several weeks by an anonymous group calling itself Guardians of Peace.

A U.S. official said Wednesday that federal investigators have now connected the Sony hacking to North Korea and are expected to make an announcement in the near future. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because the official was not authorized to openly discuss an ongoing criminal case.

Sony said it was canceling The Interview release “in light of the decision by the majority of our exhibitors not to show the film.” In a later statement, the studio added there was also no DVD or VOD in the works, either. “Sony Pictures has no further release plans for the film,” a studio spokesman said.

The studio said it respected and shared in exhibitors’ concerns.

“We are deeply saddened at this brazen effort to suppress the distribution of a movie, and in the process do damage to our company, our employees, and the American public,” read the statement. “We stand by our filmmakers and their right to free expression and are extremely disappointed by this outcome.”

Earlier Wednesday, Regal Cinemas, AMC Entertainment and Cinemark Theatres — the three top theater chains in North America — announced that they were postponing any showings of The Interview…. 

“This attack went to the heart and core of Sony’s business — and succeeded,” said Avivah Litan, a cybersecurity analyst at research firm Gartner. “We haven’t seen any attack like this in the annals of U.S. breach history.”

…Sony was also under pressure from other studios whose Christmas films could have been concern over movie going safety. Christmas is one of the most important box office weekends of the year….

Doug Stone, president of film industry newsletter Box Office Analyst, had predicted that The Interview could have made $75 million to $100 million. With Sony taking about 55 percent of domestic revenues, that could mean a $41 million to $55 million revenue loss, according to Stone….

Sony’s announcement was met with widespread distress across Hollywood and throughout many other realms watching the attack on Sony unfold. A former senior national security official in the George W. Bush administration said Sony made the wrong decision. “When you are confronted with a bully the idea is not to cave but to punch him in the nose,” Fran Townsend, Bush’s homeland security adviser, said Wednesday during a previously scheduled appearance in Washington, D.C. “This is a horrible, I think, horrible precedent.”

And where and what is Obama, Hollywood’s darling and recipient of Hollyweirdos’ multimillion $ campaign donations, doing about North Korea’s bullying?

Nothing, of course. He’s too busy with his annual winter vacation in balmy Hawaii.

Hey, Hollyweirdos! You really should look up the meaning of “useful idiots“!

H/t FOTM’s Anon

~Eowyn

Don’t be depressed. Get happy with a new Caption Contest!

This is the 80th world-famous FOTM Caption Contest!

Here’s the pic (h/t Sig94):

Kim Jung-Un

You know the drill:

  • Enter the contest by submitting your caption as a comment on FOTM (scroll down), not via email or on Facebook.
  • The winner of the Caption Contest will get a gorgeous Award Certificate of Excellence and a year’s free subscription to FOTM! :D
  • FOTM writers will vote for the winner.
  • Any captions proffered by FOTM writers, no matter how brilliant (ha ha), will not be considered. :(

To get the contest going, here’s my caption:

Supreme Leader Kim Jong-Un says “조선민주주의인민공화국” (translation: “I’m better than Obama in every way, including churning out bullshit. North Korea rules!”)

This contest will be closed in a week, at the end of next Tuesday, August 26, 2014.

For the winner of our last Caption Contest, click here!

Seen any good pics that you think would be great for our Caption Contest? Email them to us! :D

fellowshipminds@gmail.com

~Eowyn

And Today We Bring You The Latest On Kim Jong-Un

Yup, Gonna Nuke The White House he says. And in other news…..

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Go ahead. I don't care.  :)

Go ahead. I don’t care. 🙂

Seoul (AFP) – A top-ranking North Korean military official has threatened a nuclear strike on the White House and Pentagon after accusing Washington of raising military tensions on the Korean peninsula.

The threat came from Hwang Pyong-So, director of the military’s General Political Bureau, during a speech to a large military rally in Pyongyang Sunday on the anniversary of the armistice that ended the 1950-53 Korean War.

Hwang, who holds the rank of vice marshal in the Korean People’s Army, said a recent series of South Korea-US military drills, one of which included the deployment of a nuclear-powered US aircraft carrier, had ramped up tensions.

“If the US imperialists threaten our sovereignty and survival… our troops will fire our nuclear-armed rockets at the White House and the Pentagon — the sources of all evil,” Hwang said in his speech broadcast Monday on state television.

It is not the first time that North Korea’s bellicose rhetoric has included threats of nuclear strikes on the continental United States and US bases in the Pacific.

But most experts believe it is still a long way from developing a viable intercontinental ballistic missile with the required range.

Rest Here!!!

~Steve~

The North Korean air force!

korean

DCG