Tag Archives: national security

Trump says additional immigration security steps will come ‘rapidly’

liberal-head-exploding
Yes please.
From NY Post: President Trump said Friday he had “no doubt” that he would ultimately win the federal court case over his stalled executive order that would temporarily ban all refugees as well as immigrants from seven Muslim-majority countries.
Asked how he planned to fight an appellate court decision that kept in place a Seattle judge’s restraining order blocking the ban, the president offered a confident vision but was vague on details.
We are going to keep our country safe. We are going to do whatever is necessary to keep our country safe. We had a [court] decision [and] we think [we] will be very successful with and shouldn’t have taken this much time because safety is a primary reason,” Trump said.
We’ll be doing something very rapidly having to do with additional security for our country. You’ll be seeing that sometime next week. In addition, we will continue to go through the court process, and I have no doubt we’ll win that particular case.”
Trump also alluded to unspecified threats he had learned about in the three weeks of his presidency — and vowed to prevent any attacks on the US.
“While I’ve been president, which is just for a very short period of time, I have learned tremendous things that you could only learn, frankly, if you were in a certain position, namely president,” Trump said during an appearance in the East Wing of the White House with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzō Abe.
There are tremendous threats to our country. We will not allow that to happen. I can tell you that right now. We will not allow that to happen. We’ll be going forward and continuing to do things to make our country safe. It will happen rapidly.”
The president also repeated that the US would not allow dangerous people into the country, but that others would be welcome. “We will not allow people into our country who are looking to do harm to our people. We will allow lots of people into our country that will love our people and do good for our country. It will remain that way during my administration.”
Trump and Abe were heading later Friday to Trump’s Palm Beach resort, Mar-a-Lago, for a weekend of meetings and golf.
DCG

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National Guard ask police for names of gunowners and military vets

Two days ago, I received a very troubling phone call from a trusted friend. The friend does not want his name and that of his state to be made public. I will call my friend X and his state Y.

Here is what X told me:

Last Saturday, August 4, 2012, X got a phone call from a good friend, Z, who is a cop in a small town in Y.
Z said that both he and a cop in another neighboring town were paid a visit by two men, driving in separate unmarked Humvees, who identified themselves as members of the National Guard.
The two National Guardsmen (NGs) said they were “doing a survey” and asked the cops for those residents of their respective towns who:

  • own lots of firearms;
  • are long-distance shooters;
  • are military veterans.

The cops told the NGs that, it being a Saturday, they should come back on Monday when the police chiefs are at the stations. But the NGs said they are asking precisely the rank-and-file police officers; in other words, the NGs’ intent was to bypass the brass, i.e., the chain of command.
After the two NGs left, cop Z followed their vehicles and saw the NGs drive around town, making GPS readings.
Cop Z told my friend X that:

  • The National Guard is working under the Dept. of Homeland Security (DHS).
  • Obama and Eric Holder, known for their antipathy toward the Second Amendment and private gun ownership, found a legal loophole that allows the federal government to ask the questions the two NGs had asked the cops. And so Obama issued a presidential directive empowering such agencies as the FBI, U.S. Marshalls, BATF (Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms), and the National Guard to gather this information to compile a data base.

So I went looking on the web. This is what I found:

  1. I found NOTHING about the National Guard going around asking cops for information on owners of firearms and military vets, in Y or any other state.
  2. The U.S. National Guard is considered to be a reserve military force and, as such, is under the Dept. of Defense, not Homeland Security. The agencies that are under DHS are Customs and Border Protection, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), Transportation Security Administration (TSA), U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, U.S. Coast Guard, U.S. Secret Service, and the Office of Inspector General. (See DHS’s organizational chart).
  3. I cannot find a presidential directive that specifically orders federal agencies like the National Guard to conduct a firearms survey by asking cops in towns across America. But that is not to say that such a presidential directive doesn’t exist. Here’s why:
    I discovered and opened a can of worms about which I’d never even known until now. The “can of worms” is something called Presidential Directives. This is what Wikipedia says:

Presidential Directives … are a form of an executive order issued by the President of the United States with the advice and consent of the National Security Council. The directives articulate the executive’s national security policy and carry the “full force and effect of law”.

Since many of the Presidential Directives pertain to the national security of the United States, many were or are secret (“classified“).

Presidents have issued such directives under various names.
Under President George W. Bush (2001-2009), they were called National Security Presidential Directives (NSPD) and Homeland Security Presidential Directives.
Under Barack Obama (2009- ), they are called NSPD, Presidential Study Directives (to initiate policy review procedures), and Presidential Policy Directives (to promulgate Presidential decisions on national security matters).
Regarding the secrecy of presidential directives, Steven Aftergood of the Federation of American Scientists’ Project on Government Secrecy stated in February 2008 that:
“Of the 54 National Security Presidential Directives issued by the (George W.) Bush Administration to date, the titles of only about half have been publicly identified. There is descriptive material or actual text in the public domain for only about a third. In other words, there are dozens of undisclosed Presidential directives that define U.S. national security policy and task government agencies, but whose substance is unknown either to the public or, as a rule, to Congress.”
For the list of known Homeland Security Presidential Directives of George W. Bush, click here.

As for Obama’s Presidential Policy Directives (PPD), you can see from the table below that:

  • The titles of most of his Directives are unknown.
  • Of those Directives with titles, the contents (texts) of only 4 Directives (Nos. 1, 2, 8, 14) are made public.
  • The list of Obama’s Presidential Policy Directives hasn’t been updated since February 28, 2012, which means there must be more subsequent Directives for which we don’t even have a number!

Number

Presidential Policy Directive
Title

Date

PPD 1 Organization of the National Security Council System 02/13/09
PPD 2 Implementation of the National Strategy for Countering Biological Threats (National Strategy) 11/23/09
PPD 3
PPD 4 National Space Policy (Fact Sheet) 06/28/10
PPD 5
PPD 6 Global Development (Fact Sheet) 09/22/10
PPD 7 National Terrorism Advisory System (NTAS) 01/26/11
PPD 8 National Preparedness 03/30/11
PPD 9
PPD 10
PPD 11
PPD 12
PPD 13
PPD 14 Procedures Implementing Section 1022 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2012 (Fact Sheet) 02/28/12

To conclude, given:

  • The known fact that the POS in the White House and his attorney general Eric Holder want nothing more than to limit private gun ownership;
  • The fact that Presidential Directives carry “the full force and effect of law,” but are so secretive that the substance of many of these Directives is unknown to, not just the American people, but “as a rule” to Congress as well;

Then I see no reason to doubt the account of the two cops of a visit by two mysterious National Guardsmen.
We live in perilous times. The Establishment Media are not doing their job, so it is left to the alternative New Media. Our weapon is truth. Please help this post to go viral by publishing this to your Facebook page and e-mailing it to your family, friends, and acquaintances.
~Eowyn

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Georgia Employer Says It with Signs

[youtube=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KJBVrHB0AdQ]
Looman did receive some unexpected attention not long after he put up his signs and Facebook photos. He said someone, and he thinks he knows who it was, reported him to the FBI as a threat to national security. He said the accusation filtered its way through the FBI, the Department of Homeland Security and finally the Secret Service. Agents interviewed him.
“The Secret Service left here, they were in a good mood and laughing,” Looman said. “I got the feeling they thought it was kind of ridiculous, and a waste of their time.”  Full Story   ~LTG

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Russian Cyberattack on Illinois Water Plant

Cyber warfare is real and it’s here.
I belong to an e-mail list of active and retired military men, both American and foreign. The reaction from the list is that:

  • Russia accounts for the greatest number of our computer hacking, but that doesn’t necessarily mean the culprit is the Russian government. Many Russian hackers are criminals.
  • An Australian writes that China, Russia and North Korea are the three worst offenders and that attempts are made to hack his military account every day. He didn’t have active probes on his defense account until 2011; now he gets a minimum of three intercepts a day.

~Eowyn

Water treatment plant, Springfield, IL

Foreign hackers targeted U.S. water plant in apparent malicious cyber attack, expert says

By – Washington Post – Nov. 18, 2011

Foreign hackers broke into a water plant control system in Illinois last week and damaged a water pump in what appears to be the first reported case of a malicious cyber attack damaging a critical computer system in the United States, according to an industry expert.
On Nov. 8, a municipal water district employee in Illinois noticed problems with the city’s water pump control system, and a technician determined the system had been remotely hacked into from a computer located in Russia, said Joe Weiss, an industry security expert who obtained a copy of an Illinois state fusion center report describing the incident.
“This is a big deal,” said Weiss. The report stated it is unknown how many other systems might be affected.
The Department of Homeland Security confirmed that a water plant in Springfield, Ill. had been damaged, but spokesman Peter Boogaard said officials had not yet determined that the water pump failure was caused by a cyber-attack. “DHS and the FBI are gathering facts surrounding the report of a water pump failure in Springfield, Illinois. At this time there is no credible corroborated data that indicates a risk to critical infrastructure entities or a threat to public safety,” he said.
Dave Marcus, director of security research for McAfee Labs, said that the computers that control critical systems in the United States are vulnerable to attacks that come through the Internet, and few operators of these systems know how to detect them. “So many are ill-prepared for cyber attacks,” Marcus said.

Problems with the system in Springfield had been observed for two to three months and recently the system “would power on and off, resulting in the burnout of a water pump,” the Nov. 10 report from the statewide terrorism and intelligence center stated, according to Weiss, who read the report to The Washington Post.
According to the report, hackers apparently broke into a software company’s database and retrieved user names and passwords of various control systems that run water plant computer equipment. Using that data, they were able to hack into the plant in Illinois, Weiss said.
It’s not the first time that two-step technique — hack a security firm to gain the keys to enter other companies or entities — has been used.
Earlier this year, hackers believed to be working from China stole sensitive data from RSA, a division of EMC that provides secure remote computer access to government agencies, defense contractors and other commercial companies around the world. Armed with that data, they breached the computer networks of companies, including Lockheed Martin, whose employees used RSA “tokens” to log in to the corporate system from outside the office. Lockheed said that no sensitive data were taken.
“RSA is the gold standard” for remote access security in industry, said Gen. Keith Alexander, head of U.S. Cyber Command and director of the National Security Agency, at a conference in Omaha this week. “If they got hacked, where does that leave the rest?”
Alexander noted his concern about “destructive” attacks on critical systems in the United States.
According to the fusion center report obtained by Weiss, the network intrusion of the software company “is the same method of attack recently used against a Massachusetts Institute of Technology server” used to “aid and initiate an attack on other Websites.”
For Weiss, though, the incident has significance. “It was tracked to Russia. It has been in the system for at least two to three months. It has caused damage. We don’t know how many other utilities are currently compromised.”
Senior U.S. officials, including Alexander, have recently raised warnings about the risk of cyber attacks on critical infrastructure. Questions persist about the readiness and capabilities of DHS to respond to a major attack, and the scope of authority of the U.S. military, which has the greatest cyber operational capabilities, to respond.

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