Tag Archives: National Education Association

Liberal utopia of Oregon: State ranked 49th in U.S. graduation rate in 2017

Oregon Governor Kate Brown

Despite a massive education budget that is 13% of their total $37 billion state budget, Oregon has lousy results when it comes to getting kids to graduate. They rank 49th in the nation.

One of the problems is that dollars invested in education aren’t going to the classroom, they are going toward ever increasing Public Employee Retirement System (PERS), healthcare benefits and salaries. Read about the disastrous state of that program (over $22 BILLION in unfunded liabilities) here.

Despite the current situation of education in Oregon, the National Education Association (NEA) endorsed demorat Governor Kate Brown for re-election last year (she won). Excerpts from the NEA endorsement:

“Throughout her career, Kate has pushed for high-quality public education at every level—from increasing the number of preschool students to improving high school graduation rates to expanding access to technical education for adults. Understanding that reasonable class-sized lead to increased student success, Kate has proposed using additional funding to drop kindergarten class sized from an average of 22 to 20, and grades 2-3 down to 23 students per class. Kate…understands that attracting the best educators leads to student achievement.

Good luck in re-electing a governor that got you to the rank of 49th, Oregon. Maybe you’ll get up to 48th or 47th rank next year.

A recent story from Oregon Live outlines how great the state of Oregon is in educating the kids. From their story:

Oregon’s graduation rate for the class of 2017 ranks No. 49 in the nation, the federal government announced Thursday. Oregon’s rate — 77 percent — was the lowest of any state except New Mexico, where the rate was a paltry 71 percent.

Nevada, which had previously trailed Oregon, leap-frogged ahead and achieved an 81 percent on-time graduation rate, the U.S. Department of Education said.

Nevada’s big increase occurred after the state dropped its longstanding requirement that students pass exams on reading, writing, math and science to get a diploma. Oregon does not require students to pass such exams to graduate.

The new federal report does not indicate how Oregon’s most current graduation rate — 79 percent for the class of 2018 — compares to other states’.

It was a coincidence that the National Center for Education Statistics announced the state-by-state rates and new U.S. average graduation rate — 84.6 percent — for the class of 2017 on the same day that Oregon officials announced the state’s graduation rate for the class of 2018.

State officials crowed about the improvement Oregon schools brought about from 2017 to 2018, with increases of 2 percentage points or more for Latino, Native American and white students, for low-income students and for girls and for boys.

The news was not as bright in the latest federal report for the class of 2017. The national graduation rate increased just 0.5 percentage points, the most tepid improvement since 2011. Five states achieved graduation rates of at least 90 percent, led by Iowa and New Jersey at 91 percent.”

DCG

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New Mexico could be first state to force students to apply for college

melissa harris perry
While I’m all for higher education, I believe it is 1) the job of the parents to decide this matter with their children and 2) dangerous to have the government tell you what your children must do. Stay out of our lives!
From NY Post: New Mexico’s high school juniors would have to apply to at least one college or commit to other post-high school plans as part of a proposed graduation requirement that would be the first statewide push of its kind in the US.
The proposal is scheduled for its first legislative hearing on Thursday. If it eventually becomes law, New Mexico would be the first state to require post-high school plans of students, said Jennifer Zinth, who is the director of high school and STEM research at the Education Commission of the States, a Denver-based group that tracks education policy.
The bill sponsored by Rep. Nate Gentry, a Republican, and Sen. Daniel Ivey-Soto, a Democrat, would make it mandatory for public school juniors to apply to at least one two- or four-year college. Exceptions would be made for students who can prove they have committed to military service, a vocational program, or work upon graduation in an apprenticeship or internship. Parents and school guidance counselors would have to approve of the students’ plans.
The measure was drafted with the aim of reversing declines in college enrollment across the state, which fell nearly 14 percent from 155,065 enrolled students in 2010 to 133,830 in 2016.
Ivey-Soto, an attorney and former educator, said it also could encourage prospective first-generation college students to seriously consider getting into a higher education institution. “There’s a reason we call graduation commencement because it’s the beginning of their future,” Ivey-Soto said. “Let’s take that seriously.”
The New Mexico bill is modeled after a similar requirement that Gentry said was put in place for high school students in San Marcos, Texas, more than a decade ago. And last year in Chicago, Mayor Rahm Emanuel made post-high school plans a graduation requirement — saying students had to either have plans to enter the military, take part in a “gap year” program, get a job offer or apprenticeship, or have an acceptance letter from a college.
The New Mexico proposal has received a mixed response from educators, with some questioning whether the bill that asks for no extra funding will further strain schools without enough counselors to give students the attention they need to develop post-graduation plans.
“We just need to make sure that the schools are funded well enough that there is a counselor or a person who can help each student,” said Betty Patterson, president of the National Education Association-New Mexico union representing more than 8,500 school employees.
The bill seeks to boost the state’s college enrollment rate in the hopes the state would have a better-educated workforce. That could attract more companies to New Mexico, where the unemployment rate is 6.5 percent, the second-highest in the US and more than two percentage points higher than the national rate.
While students would not be required to attend college, Gentry thinks requiring them to fill out applications will make them more likely to do so. Applying to the flagship University of New Mexico costs $25. Many of the state’s community colleges don’t charge application fees and applying online can take as little as 20 minutes.
At the Academy for Technology and the Classics charter school in Santa Fe, principal Susan Lumley said she was wary of the bill if it didn’t come with extensive support for helping students apply to college.
The school in Santa Fe graduated 43 students last year and all but one enrolled in college. The only one who did not enroll in college went to a vocational school for tattoo artists.
“You’ve got to provide the support to make that happen,” Lumley said. “First-generation kids, for a lot of them, the reason they don’t go to college is they have no idea how to even start that process.”
DCG

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Best and worst states for homeschooling

We are told America is “home of the free and the brave.”
The last time I checked, no where in the U.S. Constitution does it say that Americans are compelled to send our children to dysfunctional public government schools, run by the NEA teachers’ union that recommends to its members a book dedicated to Satan.
And yet, since education is regulated by the states, if parents choose to teach their children themselves, they should know that 4o of America’s 50 states put restrictions on homeschooling, ranging from the mildest (parents must notify the state of their homeschooling) to the most onerous, including home visits by government officials.
The non-profit homeschool advocate organization HSLDA (Home School Legal Defense Association) has a map showing which states fall into which of the following four categories:

  • States requiring no notice: No state requirement for parents to initiate any contact
  • States with low regulation: State requires parental notification only.
  • States with moderate regulation: State requires parents to send notification, test scores, and/or professional evaluation of student progress.
  • State with high regulation: State requires parents to send notification or achievement test scores and/or professional evaluation, plus other requirements (e.g. curriculum approval by the state, teacher qualification of parents, or home visits by state officials).

homeschool map
legend

Here are the 10 freest states for home schooling (in green):

  1. Alaska
  2. Connecticut
  3. Idaho
  4. Illinois
  5. Indiana
  6. Michigan
  7. Missouri
  8. New Jersey
  9. Oklahoma
  10. Texas

Here are the 6 least free states for home schooling (in red):

  1. Massachusetts
  2. New York
  3. North Dakota
  4. Pennsylvania
  5. Rhode Island
  6. Vermont

I guess we should be glad that homeschooling is still legal in all 50 states, although I doubt that will remain so for long.
H/t Eric Blair of Activist Post
See sage_brush’s excellent series on homeschooling, drawing on her experience and lessons she learnt successfully homeschooling her children:

and “Government Tentacles Reaching Into Home Schools,” May 4, 2012.
~Eowyn

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United Nations & the NEA Conference for Radical Sex Ed

I want to express my gratitude to the Catholic Family & Human Rights Institute for sounding the alarm on this!  ~LTG
H/t beloved fellow Tina!  ~Eowyn

A social policy research group is exposing a radical sexual ideology that was on display at a United Nations’ meeting.
 The two-week annual gathering of the United Nation’s Commission on the Status of Women recently concluded in New York City.
  Continue reading

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