Tag Archives: National Center for Education Statistics

Liberal utopia of Oregon: State ranked 49th in U.S. graduation rate in 2017

Oregon Governor Kate Brown

Despite a massive education budget that is 13% of their total $37 billion state budget, Oregon has lousy results when it comes to getting kids to graduate. They rank 49th in the nation.

One of the problems is that dollars invested in education aren’t going to the classroom, they are going toward ever increasing Public Employee Retirement System (PERS), healthcare benefits and salaries. Read about the disastrous state of that program (over $22 BILLION in unfunded liabilities) here.

Despite the current situation of education in Oregon, the National Education Association (NEA) endorsed demorat Governor Kate Brown for re-election last year (she won). Excerpts from the NEA endorsement:

“Throughout her career, Kate has pushed for high-quality public education at every level—from increasing the number of preschool students to improving high school graduation rates to expanding access to technical education for adults. Understanding that reasonable class-sized lead to increased student success, Kate has proposed using additional funding to drop kindergarten class sized from an average of 22 to 20, and grades 2-3 down to 23 students per class. Kate…understands that attracting the best educators leads to student achievement.

Good luck in re-electing a governor that got you to the rank of 49th, Oregon. Maybe you’ll get up to 48th or 47th rank next year.

A recent story from Oregon Live outlines how great the state of Oregon is in educating the kids. From their story:

Oregon’s graduation rate for the class of 2017 ranks No. 49 in the nation, the federal government announced Thursday. Oregon’s rate — 77 percent — was the lowest of any state except New Mexico, where the rate was a paltry 71 percent.

Nevada, which had previously trailed Oregon, leap-frogged ahead and achieved an 81 percent on-time graduation rate, the U.S. Department of Education said.

Nevada’s big increase occurred after the state dropped its longstanding requirement that students pass exams on reading, writing, math and science to get a diploma. Oregon does not require students to pass such exams to graduate.

The new federal report does not indicate how Oregon’s most current graduation rate — 79 percent for the class of 2018 — compares to other states’.

It was a coincidence that the National Center for Education Statistics announced the state-by-state rates and new U.S. average graduation rate — 84.6 percent — for the class of 2017 on the same day that Oregon officials announced the state’s graduation rate for the class of 2018.

State officials crowed about the improvement Oregon schools brought about from 2017 to 2018, with increases of 2 percentage points or more for Latino, Native American and white students, for low-income students and for girls and for boys.

The news was not as bright in the latest federal report for the class of 2017. The national graduation rate increased just 0.5 percentage points, the most tepid improvement since 2011. Five states achieved graduation rates of at least 90 percent, led by Iowa and New Jersey at 91 percent.”

DCG

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US students are getting worse at math as science and reading skills stagnate

This is what happens when school administrators are concerned that everyone receives a participation trophy and coddle special snowflakes. Maybe they should focus more on real education instead of worrying about which bathrooms transgenders should use.

American Federation of Teachers union members wear "Obama, Biden 2012" shirts as they wait in line to hear U.S. Vice President Joe Biden speak during their AFT convention in Detroit, Michigan, July 29, 2012. REUTERS/Rebecca Cook

American Federation of Teachers union members wear “Obama, Biden 2012” shirts as they wait in line to hear U.S. Vice President Joe Biden speak during their AFT convention in Detroit, Michigan, July 29, 2012. REUTERS/Rebecca Cook


From Daily Mail: Americans students are having major math problems and have fallen behind the rest of the world, a new study has revealed. The latest global snapshot of student performance shows declining math scores in the U.S., while performances in science and reading stagnated.
The concerning findings were part of the 2015 Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) study, which looks into the performance of more than 500,000 15-year-olds across schools in more than 70 countries. Just under 6,000 students took part in American schools.
The top performing country in all three categories was Singapore, while Hong Kong and Macau were second and third in mathematics. Japan and Estonia, and Canada and Hong Kong rounded out the top-three in science and reading, respectively.  The U.S. ranked 40th in math, 24th in reading, and 25th in science.
‘We’re losing ground – a troubling prospect when, in today’s knowledge-based economy, the best jobs can go anywhere in the world,’ Education Secretary John B. King Jr. said after the results were published. ‘Students in Massachusetts, Maryland, and Minnesota aren’t just vying for great jobs along with their neighbors or across state lines, they must be competitive with peers in Finland, Germany, and Japan.’
Education Secretary John King

Education Secretary John King


Math was a stubborn concern, the experts identifying the drop off the result of something that has been building for years. The U.S. average score was 470, below the international average of 490. Singapore topped the math chart with an average of 564. The American score was 12 points lower than it was in 2012 and 18 points lower than in 2009. The tests are based on a 1,000-point scale.
‘This pattern that we’re seeing in mathematics seems to be consistent with what we’ve seen in previous assessments – everything is just going down,’ Peggy Carr, acting commissioner at the National Center for Education Statistics, said.
Andreas Schleicher, director of education and skills at OECD, said the struggle of American students in math was in part due to their inability to solve more complex problems. ‘Students are often good at answering the first layer of a problem in the United States,’ Schleicher said. ‘But as soon as students have to go deeper and answer the more complex part of a problem, they have difficulties.’
Moving away from math, the study also found U.S. students were right around the international average in science and reading. Americans scored 496 in science, compared to a global mean of 493, and 497 in reading, compared to 493. Scores in both categories have remained flat since 2009. The study is the latest to document how American students are under-performing their peers in several Asian nations.
ATF President Randi Weingarten

ATF President Randi Weingarten


The American Federation of Teachers (AFT) described the results as ‘disappointing but not surprising’. ‘They were predictable given the impact of the last 15 years of U.S. education policies combined with continuing state disinvestment following the 2008 recession. Thirty-one states still spend less per pupil than before the recession,’ AFT President Randi Weingarten said.
Judge Judy shakes head rolls eyes
National Center on Education and the Economy President Marc Tucker said the test proves the U.S. needs to look at what works for ‘smarter countries’ around the world and adopt those methods. ‘It is critical to look not only at their average high performance, but also at the strategies they use to achieve much greater equity across and within schools compared to the United States,’ Tucker said.
The test is coordinated by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), and conducted every three years. Schools included in each country are randomly selected.
DCG

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