Tag Archives: NAACP

Seattle candidate accused of defrauding tax-payer funded democracy voucher program

sheley secrest

Sheley Secrest

The accusation is, of course, raaaaaaaaaacist.

From Seattle Times: Seattle police are investigating a City Council campaign after an allegation that it tried to defraud Seattle’s first-in-the-nation, taxpayer-funded “democracy voucher” program.

The police inquiry comes after a former campaign manager for Sheley Secrest went to city elections officials to accuse Secrest of putting her own money into the campaign and claiming it was donated by Seattle voters.

The Seattle Times reached five of those voters. All five said they did not give money to Secrest.

“No, I did not make a contribution,” said Jennifer Estroff. “I’m very confident of that.”

“I definitely did not give a donation,” said Robert Carson. “That’s definitely false.”

Seattle police Deputy Chief Carmen Best said that because of the investigation, “it would be inappropriate to comment further at this time.”

Secrest, an attorney and vice president of the local NAACP chapter, finished sixth in the Aug. 1 primary, with 4.5 percent of the vote and did not advance to the fall election for City Council Position 8.

Secrest strongly denied the allegation Wednesday, dismissing it as a fabrication by her disgruntled former campaign manager Patrick Burke, whom she said she fired. “I know he’s upset because he was terminated,” she said.

She maintained the campaign did not take any shortcuts or violate any ethics. “Nothing has been filed against me. There have been no complaints,” she said.

She did not have an explanation for why five people listed as contributors on records submitted to the city elections office told The Seattle Times they did not donate to Secrest. “I have absolutely no clue,” she said. She said contributions were collected from all of them.

If the allegations are substantiated, they could deeply bruise Seattle’s novel program, approved by voters in 2015 to give grass-roots candidates a better chance against well-funded campaigns. At the same time, an investigation might show the program’s integrity.

The contributions at issue were crucial to Secrest’s efforts to qualify for potentially more than $100,000 in democracy vouchers. She did not qualify, in part, because some signatures submitted by the campaign were not from Seattle residents and some were not from registered voters, according to elections records.

The voucher program’s rules for qualifying require that a candidate collect 400 small contributions and corresponding signatures from Seattle voters. Elections officials then verify the signatures as a safeguard against fraudulent signatures, which were found in Portland’s public-financing system.

As Secrest got close to qualifying, she reported 56 signatures collected June 23 that might put her over the threshold. Each signature was accompanied by a reported $10 contribution on paperwork submitted to the Seattle Ethics and Elections Commission. The commission oversees the voucher program.

Burke, the former campaign manager, alleges Secrest used $560 of her own money to account for the 56 contributions, substituting her own funds for those her campaign said came from Seattle voters. That would be illegal.

Burke said he was sitting in a car with Secrest on June 26 when she took out an envelope full of $20 bills. According to Burke, she said “that’s 560” and filled in a $10 contribution next to each of the 56 signatures. Burke said he asked Secrest where she got the money, and she replied, “off my credit card.”

“I categorically deny all of that,” Secrest said. “That never, ever took place … To say we did something dishonest, that’s offensive.”

She also said, “It’s a shame a white man would lead these attacks.”

Read the rest of the story here.

DCG

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NAACP Issues Police Violence Travel Advisory

Who issued a Travel Advisory?

Did your “Spidey sense” tingle at that headline, too? See also:

Travel Advisory Issued for U.S. State of Missouri

11:18 GMT – Trending on EIN Newsdesk
NAACP officials say their recent travel advisory for Missouri is the first that the civil rights group has issued for any state. But the warning follows a recent trend of similar alerts issued by other groups for vulnerable people around the United States. The travel advisory, circulated in June by the Missouri NAACP and recently taken up by the national organization, comes after … (continue reading)


EfficientGov:
The FBI’s 10 Most Dangerous Cities

February 2, 2017 – by Megan Wells

Top 10 Most Dangerous U.S. Cities, by Violent Crimes:

1. St. Louis, Missouri

  • Population: 317,095
  • Total violent crime: 2,781
  • Violent crime rate per 100,000 inhabitants: 877.02

https://efficientgov.com/blog/2017/02/02/fbi-10-dangerous-cities/


About that police violence problem in Missouri

Missouri…  just the kind of place to want fewer police.
Hmmm…

The NAACP fails to acknowledge the fact that mob violence from any demographic, and the deliberate assassination of police officers would force police to act more quickly, sometimes with lethal force. Even if the mobs were a bunch of white Baby Boomers, the police would be forced to act. It’s the behavior, not the color.

PS: Who issues travel advisories?

We are accustomed to travel advisories issued by the State Department. Does the NAACP fancy itself now as a legitimate arm of the US government? The terms, “self-appointed” and “overreach,” come to mind.

 

Rachel Dolezal speaks out: ‘I am not a fraud’

rachel dolezal

Rachel Dolezal: Her label is too complicated…

I have a label for her: delusional.

From MyNorthwest.com: Nearly two years after the world discovered that the head of Spokane’s NAACP was not a black woman, but a white woman passing as African-American, Rachel Dolezal maintains she is not a fraud.

“I have an authentic identity,” Dolezal told KIRO Radio’s Jason and Burns Show. “Even though I was born to white parents, I have an authentic cultural and philosophical, political identity, and that is described as ‘black’ within the terms we have in our society right now.”

“If there was a more complex label allowed, I would describe myself as trans black … born into a white category and identifying as black, maybe even Pan-African, pro black, bisexual, activist, artist, other,” she said. “I really am a human being. I am a mom. I am a woman. The last thing that describes or defines me is a fraud.”

That’s a sentiment delivered in Dolezal’s recently-released book, “In Full Color: Finding My Place in a Black and White World.” What readers will likely find is that there is more to the story behind Dolezal than reported. For example, Gerald Hankerson, NAACP president of the Alaska Oregon Washington state area is quoted on the back cover:

The storm of vitriol Rachel received in the national spotlight was as cruel as it was undeserved. Her deep compassion for others shines through every chapter of her life and has clearly motivated her truly outstanding advocacy work.

Albert Wilkerson Jr., the man who Dolezal describes as her non-biological father, wrote the forward. He describes how her “vibe felt black” and how he was unaware of Dolezal’s white parents, but it didn’t matter to him. He cared more about her social justice work.

But not everyone is as accepting as Hankerson and Wilkerson, as Jason and Burns found out when they interviewed Dolezal, pressing her on issues of fraud and comparing trans-racial experiences to that of the transgender community.

Rachel Dolezal: Early life

Dolezal briefed Jason and Burns on her life story, starting when she was very young and she did not feel white. By the time she was 8 years old, she learned to repress her non-white feelings.

“I felt like I had been born wrong,” she said. “I had something wrong with me and I had to atone for that whether it was in the religious sphere I was in; sometimes it was labeled as being demon possessed, or just even dancing to music was not OK as a girl. I really repressed my entire childhood. When I got to college I was still, in many ways, repressed and heavily socially conditioned and brainwashed into believing race was biological.

Things began to change when she attended college in Mississippi, she said. She thinks it was then that many people began to feel as if she was light-skinned, but African American.

“The way that I moved in the very racially polarized Mississippi culture, people were, ‘Well, she can’t be white if she is comfortable in this environment,’ or is doing with x, y, z; fighting for civil rights,” Dolezal said. “…so people started assuming that I was black. And I let that assumption be and carry. But I didn’t assert or feel personal agency to name my identity until after my divorce.”

Her identity was put on hold again, Dolezal explained, when she was married after college. Her husband had no interest in black culture. Her religious upbringing kicked in and she submitted to her husband. But at 26, she was divorced. She took on four jobs, raised her kids, started therapy to deal with sexual and childhood abuses, and the PTSD it left behind. She continued on as a black woman and met her non-biological father. And eventually she became involved in the Spokane NAACP.

Some of her community has faded away, and others close to her have stuck around through the hard times. “When this all happened they had whatever reaction they felt,” Dolezal recalled. “Some people were bothered and felt a sense of betrayal that I hadn’t disclosed everything to them. Those relationships I lost. Other people were not bothered by it … Those relationships with people who knew me better than the surface, who knew me more than a casual relationship, they lasted.”

And since the fallout in 2015, Dolezal has found support in other corners of the world. People have reached out to her.

“In the public eye, I think I am on a little bit of an island, but I hear from people every day who feel the way I feel; in the same direction, in the opposite direction across the color line,” she said. “An Asian man who feels white and has done surgery to his eyes to transition; a white man who feels Mexican and has done surgery to his nose and has altered his appearance and is living in Mexico; a black woman who feels white and has altered her appearance. I hear from people all the time who have a sense of plural identity, but are handling it in a very private way … I think people are scared. They don’t want to be mocked and shamed or ridiculed into isolation or be treated the way I have been treated.”

“I don’t see myself as a victim,” Dolezal said. “I do feel like I’m a survivor … I’ve survived a number of things throughout life and I’m doing my best to make it through another round of challenges right now.”

DCG

McGregor hopes to become 1st transgender person on Seattle City Council

matt mcgregor for seattle city council

Seattle City Council candidate Matt McGregor

Playing identity politics in Seattle. Well, I’m sure that will work heavily in his favor in proggieland.

From Seattle Times: “We’re not going back in the shadows:” That’s a message Mac McGregor wants to send with his campaign this year for Seattle City Council. McGregor is trying to become the first transgender person elected to the council, and he believes he’d be the first elected anywhere in Washington state.

The 53-year-old, who sits on Seattle Police Department’s LGBTQ Advisory Council and served on the Seattle LGBTQ Commission, said November’s election motivated him to seek office.

McGregor said President Trump’s “pretty extreme, religious-right administration” wants to roll back the clock on protections and acceptance of minorities. “They want us to be silent, but we’re not going to do it,” he said. “I’m going to stand for all marginalized people.”

The Beacon Hill resident is one of 10 candidates registered with the Seattle Ethics and Elections Commission to run for Position 8. Position 8 and Position 9, the council’s citywide seats, are up for election this year. The council’s seven district seats will be up in 2019. Position 8 is an open seat because Councilmember Tim Burgess announced in December he would not seek re-election.

Other than McGregor, the candidates include former Tenants Union of Washington State executive director Jon Grant, local NAACP Vice President Sheley Secrest, Washington State Labor Council political director Teresa Mosqueda and Washington State Human Rights Commission chair Charlene Strong.

Others are Ryan Asbert, who has promised to make council decisions based on a constituent-input app; Hisam Goueli, a Northwest Hospital doctor who wants to develop city-run health insurance; James Passey, who describes himself as a Libertarian; Rudy Pantoja, whose video-recorded interaction with a North Precinct police-station opponent at City Hall in August went viral; and Jenn Huff, are also registered.

Grant’s campaign has raised the most money — nearly $76,000 — most of it through the city’s new democracy-vouchers taxpayer program. Mosqueda’s campaign has raised about $53,000 and Goueli more than $11,000. The other candidates have each raised less than $10,000.

The outcome of the Position 8 race could have a significant impact on Seattle politics: Burgess is one of the nonpartisan council’s longest-tenured members and is widely considered the most moderate voice on a panel of progressives (HAHAHAHA‼!).

McGregor is a former martial-arts competitor, coach and gym owner with “a black belt in 17 different styles.” He grew up in Florida in a “ very dysfunctional family.”

“It was my community that stepped up and made a difference in my life … giving me rides to school events and making sure I had a sandwich,” he said. “That really taught me to give back to my community.”

The candidate, who lives with his wife and teenager, said he thought twice about launching a campaign, wondering whether someone might target his family. “I’ve been pretty public about who I am for a while, but you put yourself under a different level of scrutiny running for office,” he said.

McGregor said he agrees with Mayor Ed Murray on many issues, but believes the way the city has been carrying out evictions and cleanups of unauthorized homeless encampments hasn’t been fair. “I understand it’s a complex problem. There’s no easy answer to the homeless issue we have in our city,” he said. “Even if we took everybody off the street who was there today and gave them housing, we’d have another homeless problem in six months.”

He said he’d like to see the city get community members more involved in cleaning up encampments. “I’m a big community organizer and some groups are already starting to do it,” he said. “

Other key issues for McGregor include police reform and the persistent gap in pay between men and women. He said he helped develop training for the Seattle Police Department around interacting with transgender people.

McGregor said the city needs to “keep asking more” of developers in the creation of affordable housing so that teachers, nurses and police officers aren’t priced out.

DCG

Rachel Dolezal, white woman who identifies as black, now jobless, may soon be homeless

Rachel Dolezal

Girlfriend needs a dose of reality. Or is “reality” a “social construct” as well?

From Fox News: Rachel Dolezal, the infamous white woman who for years passed herself off as African American and rose to become head of an NAACP branch, is now jobless, on food stamps and expects to soon be homeless.

A defiant Dolezal, 39, recounted her current plight to The Guardian. Dolezal said she’s only been offered jobs in reality television and porno flicks. A friend helped her come up with the money for February’s rent and she doesn’t know how she’s going to pay for March.

And she still says she’s not white.

“I do think a more complex label would be helpful, but we don’t really have that vocabulary,” Dolezal told The Guardian. “I feel like the idea of being trans-black would be much more accurate than ‘I’m white.’ Because, you know, I’m not white . . . Calling myself black feels more accurate than saying I’m white.”

Dolezal was exposed in June 2015 when a local television crew asked her the simple question: “Are you African American?”

Pictures of a younger, white-skinned and blonde-haired Dolezal soon surfaced and her story exploded. The formerly successful leader of the Spokane NAACP chapter and a university professor, Dolezal – who once sued historically-black Howard University for racial discrimination, because she was white – now says she’s been turned down for 100 jobs and her memoir was rejected by 30 publishers before finding a taker.

She’s also apparently begun ruffling feathers in the transgender community by claiming that race, like gender, is fluid. “It’s more so,” Dolezal told The Guardian. “Because it wasn’t even biological to begin with. It was always a social construct.”

Dolezal said she’s never considered identifying as white again.

“I feel that I was born with the essential essence of who I am, whether it matches my anatomy and complexion or not,” Dolezal said. “I’ve never questioned being a girl or a woman, for example, but whiteness has always felt foreign to me, for as long as I can remember. I didn’t choose to feel this way or be this way, I just am. What other choice is there than to be exactly who we are?”

DCG

Pre-order Rachel Dolezal’s book!

rachel-dolezal-book

Available in March 2017! Only $14.49 on Kindle! Only $15.44 for hardcover!

HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!

From Amazon:

A lot of people think they know what Rachel Doležal is. Race faker. Liar. Opportunist. Crazy bitch.

But they don’t get to decide who Rachel Doležal is. What determines your race? Is it your DNA? The community in which you were raised? The way others see you, or the way you see yourself?

On June 11, 2015, the media “outed” Rachel Doležal as a white woman who had knowingly been “passing” as black. When asked if she were African American during an interview about the hate crimes directed at her and her family, she hesitated before ending the interview and walking away. Some interpreted her reluctance to respond and hasty departure as dishonesty, while others assumed she lacked a reasonable explanation for the almost unprecedented way she identified herself. With In Full Color, Rachael Doležal describes the path that led her from being a child of white evangelical parents to an NAACP chapter president and respected educator and activist who identified as black. Along the way, she’ll discuss the deep emotional bond she formed with her four adopted black siblings, the sense of belonging she felt while living in black communities in Jackson, Mississippi and Washington, D.C., and the experiences she’s had while living as a black woman.

Her story is nuanced and complex, and in the process of telling it, she forces us to consider race in an entirely new light—not as a biological imperative, but as a function of the experiences we have, the culture we embrace, and, ultimately, the identity we choose.

Go to the link below to order this sure-to-be best seller:

https://www.amazon.com/Full-Color-Finding-Place-Black/dp/194464816X/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1483069242&sr=1-1&keywords=black+and+white+world+dolezal

DCG

Seattle teachers organize Black Lives Matter day

blacks protesting black-on-black crimes

From MyNorthwest.com: Seattle teachers are organizing a Black Lives Matter demonstration next week.

The demonstration will simply be teachers wearing Black Lives Matter T-shirts on Oct. 19. The teachers are planning their demonstration during the kick-off event for Seattle Public Schools’ effort to close the achievement gap between black and white students. The plan is separate from the effort.

The scenario is familiar to last month when teachers planned to wear Black Lives Matter T-shirts during an unrelated event. The demonstration was received as controversial by some and was ultimately cancelled. The annual Black Men Uniting to Change the Narrative event at John Muir Elementary School was canceled as well — the same day teachers planned to wear Black Lives Matter T-shirts — after there were threats against the school.

KIRO 7 reports that about 1,000 teachers in the district have ordered Black Lives Matter T-shirts ahead of time. And that Hamilton Middle School teacher Sarah Arvey organized the demonstration in response to the threats directed at John Muir Elementary.

black-lives-matter-ferguson

An email was sent from Seattle Public Schools to families on Oct. 7 explaining the school district’s plans, and the teachers’ demonstration. It explains that the district is starting an effort to close the achievement gap between its white students and students of color.

“While Seattle Public Schools outperforms like districts academically and is considered a high performing urban district, we still have unacceptable opportunity and achievement gaps. We have the 5th largest academic achievement gap in the nation between black and white students.”

As a result of that gap, the Seattle district is debuting a campaign called “Close the Gaps.” The district is starting the effort with events during Oct. 16-22.

The email also notes that during the kick-off week, the district is promoting Oct. 19 as a “day of solidarity to bring focus to racial equity and affirming the lives of out students — specifically students of color.” The district points out that the Seattle Education Association — the teachers union — is organizing the Black Lives Matter demonstration.

“In support of this focus, members are choosing to wear Black Lives matter t-shirts, stickers or other symbols of their commitment to students in a coordinated effort.”

The email ends by saying the teachers union is leading the t-shirt effort and “working to promote transformational conversations with staff, families, and students on this issue.”

Ferguson looter

Additional information from Q13Fox:

Throughout the week, they’re encouraging teachers to have race-related lesson plans and they’re offered resources to guide the conversation.

From the TV screens to social media to the classrooms at Garfield High, students are talking about racial injustices and Black Lives Matter.

It’s important for us to know the history of racial justice and racial injustice in our country and in our world and really in order for us to address it.   When we’re silent, we close off dialogue and we close the opportunity to learn and grow from each other,” said Arvey.

I would say that it’s not a political agenda. I would say we’re here to support families. We’re here to support students. As Rita from the NAACP said, when black lives matter, all lives matter,” said Avery.

DCG