Tag Archives: Mukilteo shooting

Mukilteo shooting victim’s brother sues killer, store where gun was purchased

Frivolous.

From KIRO: A lawsuit has been filed against a Washington state man convicted of killing three people at a house party and against the store where he bought the gun used in the killings.

The Daily Herald reports David Bui filed the suit earlier this month against 22-year-old Allen Ivanov, his parents and the Cabela’s outfitter store in Marysville, claiming the store and his parents should have known how Ivanov was planning to use the AR-15-style rifle.

(Note: Ivanov legally purchased his firearm. He warned friends that he was going to commit a mass shooting and those who actually knew how he was planning to use the AR-15 said absolutely NOTHING. From Wikipedia: Ivanov sent text messages to his friends alluding to his plans to commit a mass shooting a couple of days beforehand, calling himself a “future shooter”. Police say he was motivated by the recent breakup between him and one of the victims, and his anger that his ex-girlfriend seemed to be moving along in her life.)

Bui is the brother of Anna Bui, who was killed in July 2016 at a house in Mukilteo along with Jacob Long and Jordan Ebner. Ivanov was sentenced last year to life in prison without parole.

Representatives for Bass Pro Shops, Cabela’s parent company, did not return the newspaper’s calls or an email seeking comment.

DCG

Better than Drudge Report. Check out Whatfinger News, the Internet’s conservative frontpage founded by ex-military!

Please follow and like us:
0
 

Mukilteo shooter’s lawyer says tragedy was ‘compounded by the tools’ available

Maybe the lawyer should take his grievances to the Washington State Legislature, who writes the laws concerning firearm ownership for young adults in Washington. Or maybe his client was intent on committing a crime, regardless of the methods available to him.

The perp Allen Ivanov

The perp Allen Ivanov


From MyNorthwest.com: The lawyer of a 19-year-old accused of killing three people during a party in Mukilteo (Washington) took time in court to note how easy it was for his client to get his hands on a gun. “It’s a tragedy,” Attorney Tim Leary told KIRO Radio. “And in many respects, it’s a tragedy compounded by the tools that were available in this incident.”
Allen Ivanov allegedly went to a party July 30 with an AR-15 rifle and opened fire. Three people, including his ex-girlfriend, were killed. A fourth person was injured.
Ivanov seemed depressed recently after he and his ex-girlfriend broke up. He reportedly did not like seeing is ex-girlfriend with other men.
Leary stressed in court that his client was able to buy a gun at the age of 19. “It’s not black or white,” Leary said. “Obviously, if he didn’t have the firearm this could have been a different case. Is the firearm responsible? Well, no.”
KIRO 7 reports that Ivanov could face the death penalty.
“Ultimately, the state is going to bring evidence that suggests my client is the person responsible,” he said. “But is this what really makes the most sense — when we have a situation where we talk about brain development, and kids, and mental illness and a whole host of issues — to have an AR-15 that is that readily accessible, the stakes and the consequences are that much higher?”
As he spoke for the accused Mukilteo shooter in court, Leary noted that the age to consume alcohol is 21, but people can buy guns at the age of 18.
“The thing that struck me in this case is that my client, who is 19 years old, is accused of a horrific crime and it’s alleged that he purchased an AR-15 when he was 19,” Leary said. “Somebody who is 19 years old, if he would have attempted to buy a six-pack of beer on his way to this party, he would have been turned away.”
Leary said that there were incidents of depression in the past for Ivanov, but he did not have the exact timeline as it relates to the shooting.
“Let’s say that he went in the morning he purchased the firearm and a doctor said he was suffering from a major depressive disorder — that would not be a bar from possessing or owning a firearm,” Leary said.
“There’s a reason why we have this endless debate – there are no easy answers,” Leary said. “This is just not a good situation, and it’s a situation made worse by the weapon that he possessed.”
“I’m just noting the disturbing fact that we don’t trust 20-year-olds to own, possess or consume alcohol, but they could walk in and buy an AR-15 with no training at all — no significant background inquiry,” he said.
Leary said that he has received pushback after his comment in court about the availability of the firearm. He said that people argue that 19-year-olds can serve in the military and handle guns — the same age as the alleged Mukilteo shooter.
“I don’t necessarily disagree,” Leary said. “Whether you were drafted to go to Vietnam, or you volunteered and served in Iraq – there’s a selection process and psychological screening and an immense amount of training and respect that goes into handling a firearm.”
(FYI: Washington State requires no training to purchase a firearm. If you want a conceal carry permit you don’t need to take a class, either. Yet when I moved to Oklahoma, I was required to undergo a written test of the laws to obtain my conceal carry. I was exempt from the range class because I had a conceal carry permit from Washington State.)
On the other hand, Leary said his client was unfamiliar with the AR-15, and reportedly read the gun’s user manual in the car before he allegedly carried out his shooting.
“The police reports suggest that my client read an instruction manual on how to operate the gun before he went into that house,” Leary said. “Ultimately, my client’s responsibility will be determined down the road. But is this the best system, and what can we learn from this situation? The loss, in this case, is immeasurable to my client’s family, to the victims and their families, and the community as a whole.”
FYI: From my Legally Armed 2 book (published in 2015) it is noted from the Revised Code of Washington: “9.41.240 Possession of pistol by person from eighteen to twenty-one: Unless an exception under RCW 9.41.042, 9.41.050, or 9.41.060 applies, a person at least eighteen years of age, but less than twenty-one years of age, may possess a pistol only: (1) In the person’s place of abode; (2) At the person’s fixed place of business; or (3) on real property under his or her control.”
DCG

Please follow and like us:
0