Tag Archives: Kshama Sawant

General strike, rally called for this weekend in Seattle

trump-triggeredFrom MyNorthwest.com: Better stock up on essentials before the weekend — just in case. A National General Strike, a Seattle area strike, and a rally have been called for. And as with any event in Seattle, whether it be a Seahawks game or a protest march, locals should plan for traffic and other interruptions.

A general strike means no working, no school, and no shopping. For many people, this should be easy. According to the Facebook event for the general strike, it will run from Feb. 17-20 (Friday through Monday). It covers the weekend and Presidents Day, which some workers have off as a holiday.

The event is organized by General Strike USA. It’s a bit wordy, but according to the event page:

WE DEMAND RECONSTITUTION. Disrupt the economy until we have a government, instead of being had by one. This is how we stop Trump and the entire corrupt political establishment before they destroy us and the planet we call home.

At this dangerous point in our history, we must confront a bitter truth: any political system that can allow Donald Trump to come to power is not a system worth keeping. Indeed, our elections, as controlled by the major political parties, offer us merely a contest of personalities rather than a choice between real alternatives. These contests mask the major parties’ underlying unity in a neoliberal economic establishment that serves the wealthy few at the expense of the impoverished many.

The general strike promotes a change of the system, not a change within the system, and encourages dismantling the establishment.

So far, the Facebook event has more than 2,000 people signed up, nationally, to participate, with 3,000 more interested in taking part. And 22,000 more have been invited to strike.

General strike in Seattle: A separate, unrelated general strike is organized in Seattle amid the national event. The Solidarity Strike is slated to take place between 11 a.m. and 4 p.m., Feb. 17 at Volunteer Park in Seattle. It is organized by Solidarity for Justice in Education.

As the organization’s name implies, the strike is more focused on Washington’s education system as lawmakers are in session, attempting to fully fund it. The State of Washington has been ordered by its own Supreme Court to fully fund education. But there has been a tug-of-war between Democrats and Republicans on just how to do that.

The event notice states: Solidarity Demonstration to #Resist the WA Senate Republican proposal to fund education by undermining collective bargaining rights of Education Workers. All Labor Unions are welcome and encouraged to stand in support of this Legislative attack on Unions. No Right to Work in Washington.

The Seattle event has 1,300 people interested in taking part, and 324 confirmed to go. There are 1,600 more invited to come. Comments on the event’s page seem to have a theme — it would have a better turnout if organizers planned it on the weekend, instead of during the workday.

Free Daniel rally: Before Seattle’s strike in Volunteer Park, another event has been put together at the last minute by a range of organizers, including Seattle Councilmember Kshama Sawant.

The “Free Daniel Rally Against Deportations Fight Trump!” is scheduled for 9 a.m. at the Seattle Federal Courthouse in downtown Seattle. At least 1,000 people are interested in attending, and more than 200 have committed to going. Another 1,400 have been invited.

The event is partially motivated by a series of immigration roundups and detainments. Then, locally, Daniel Ramirez Medina was detained after he had an encounter with the law. He is covered under regulations passed under the Obama administration that allows immigrants who entered the country as minors to stay in renewable two-year periods. That regulation is known as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA.

The Facebook event states: Over the last week, Trump’s administration has detained and deported 600+ immigrants. Here in Seattle, on Tuesday 2/14, Daniel Ramirez Medina, a 23-year-old father who has received repeated approval to stay and work under the DACA program, was taken by ICE.  Medina has a court appearance on Friday during the rally.

The Department of Homeland Security argues another perspective. It says that those protected under DACA can be deported if they are perceived as threats to public safety.

According to a press release from DHS:

On February 10, Daniel Ramirez-Medina, a gang member, was encountered at a residence in Des Moines, Washington, during an operation targeting a prior-deported felon. He was arrested by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) and was transferred to the Northwest Detention Center to await the outcome of removal proceedings before an immigration judge.

This case illustrates the work ICE fugitive operations teams perform every day across the country to remove public safety threats from our communities when they encounter them. ICE officers, along with their law enforcement partners, have and will continue to enforce our nation’s laws to protect public safety, national security, and to preserve the integrity of our immigration system.”

DCG

 

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More Libtard Butthurt: Multiple days of anti-Trump protests planned in Seattle

butthurt

The TDS (Trump Derangement Syndrome) is going to blow the BDS (Bush Derangement Syndrome) off the charts.

From MyNorthwest.com: Seattle voters did not come out in favor of President-elect Donald Trump during the last election. Protests erupted in the city after he defeated Democrat Hillary Clinton. Now that Trump is slated to take over the Oval Office on Jan. 20, people in Seattle plan to continue their opposition with a series of anti-Trump protests and events.

There are three major events planned and targeted at President-elect Trump.

Brothers and Sisters,

We don’t have a moment to waste in getting organized against Trump’s racist, misogynistic, anti-immigrant, anti-muslim, anti-lgbtq rhetoric, proposals, and cabinet members.

Join the Resist Trump Coalition and my office at City Hall to help build the biggest possible protests against Trump on January 20th and 21st.

Detailed information about the agenda for this meeting will be provided asap.

Solidarity! Kshama

The event specifically cites opposition to building a wall on the Mexican border, stopping the Dakota Access Pipeline, ending rape culture, and supporting Black Lives Matter. The Facebook event page reads:

The Democratic Party has proven they are incapable of stopping Trump. It is time to build a new party for the 99% based on the united power of all exploited and oppressed people, on movements for social and economic justice, on the belief that we CAN do better than this corrupt and rotten system!

#ResistTrump !! #OccupyInauguration !!

  • Jan. 21: The day after the inauguration, the “Women’s March on Seattle” is planned between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. for downtown Seattle. A route for the march has yet to be released, but the Facebook event page states it will be announced once approved by city officials. The women’s march is organized be four private citizens. As of Tuesday morning, the event has 29,000 people signed on for the Seattle march, with 41,000 more people interested in attending.

The event announcement reads:

In solidarity with the march taking place in Washington, DC, we will march in Seattle. ALL women, femme, trans, gender non-conforming, and feminist people (including men and boys) are invited to march. We are showing our support for the community members who have been marginalized by the recent election.

The Seattle women’s march is meant to coincide with the larger, national march on Washington D.C. that same day.

DCG

Beloved Seattle café closes because they were ‘crushed’ by ever-growing costs, including city’s new minimum wage

I anxiously wait for comments from the socialist and $15-minimum-wage supporter, Seattle councilmember Kshama Sawant.

government solve all problems

From MyNorthwest.com: The owner of a beloved cafe and bakery says the costs to operate in Seattle contributed to the sudden shuttering of its doors.

Alcena Plum, former owner of Louisa’s on Eastlake, says the closure is reflective of a city that is becoming increasingly expensive to be in.

“I don’t want to put this all on the minimum wage, but it was definitely a factor,” she told KIRO Radio’s Tom and Curley. “There were ongoing issues with the business for years.”

Plum says the business was struggling to make ends meet. The city’s minimum wage law, which requires employers with 500 or fewer employees to pay at least $11 an hour by Jan. 1, was hurting Plum’s bottom line, she says.

However, there were other factors that played into the closure. “This type of business doesn’t necessarily bring in enough revenue to employ as many people as I was able to employ before,” Plum said. “Then service goes down because I don’t have enough staff or our wait times are longer for food because I can’t afford to hire enough people in the kitchen. Never mind the huge labor shortage for kitchen staff in this city.”

Plum says it’s becoming increasingly difficult to find qualified candidates — or any candidates at all — to work in the food service industry. The people moving to Seattle and King County are all doing so to work in the tech industry, she says. She’s not wrong.

According to Gene Balk with The Seattle Times, the number of people born in Washington and living in King County declined. Between 2014 and 2015, their number fell by more than 17,000 — a 2 percent drop,” Balk writes. “There are now 850,000 Washington-born residents in the county or 40 percent of its total population.

By the same token, Seattle’s housing market became the hottest in the nation as the booming tech industry drives record population growth, GeekWire reports. Transplants “flock to the region” for tech jobs.

“People are working in tech,” Plum said. “You don’t have people moving into [Seattle] to work in a kitchen … It doesn’t pay the most, although the wages are going up.”

Plum says when she places ads for the cook, she now gets zero response.

What is possibly the most frustrating part of the closure for Plum is she had to put 20 people out of work with only a day’s notice. Some of her employees had worked at Louisa’s for 18 years or more. Plum started a GoFundMe campaign to try and help her former employees.

As far as other restaurants go, Plum says they are probably tackling similar issues. However, some establishments may have multiple restaurants or are backed by more money. “Look who is backing them. Where is money coming from?” Plum asked. “That’s a question above my pay grade. I’m a single mom with a café-bakery. I don’t know how people make this stuff work anymore, to be honest. We were being crushed under the weight of debt and things we weren’t able to pay for anymore.”

Residents of Seattle shouldn’t be surprised if they see menu prices continue to increase due to ever-growing costs, Plum says. As for smaller places like Louisa’s go, Plum doesn’t hold out much hope. “Places like mine won’t survive this.”

DCG

Socialist Seattle City Council Member Kshama Sawant warns of a larger anti-Trump protest in the future

You thought the Bush Derangement Syndrome was bad? I predict major proggie butthurt for the next four years…

Socialist Kshama Sawant dares to question someone else's "objectivity"

Socialist Kshama Sawant has a major butthurt issue

From MyNorthwest.com: Seattle City councilmember Kshama Sawant warns that the protest against President-elect Donald Trump on Wednesday night is just the beginning.

Sawant, who attended the march, warned of an even larger event on Inauguration Day. KIRO 7’s Essex Porter reports Sawant called for a nationwide shutdown on Jan. 20, 2017.

The protest against President-elect Donald Trump at Westlake Center grew into a march with several hundred people across the streets of Seattle.

The original protest was organized by the Socialist Alternative, and included concerned members of the LBGTQ community, immigrants and Muslims worried about the Trump presidency.

Hundreds of others joined the march that moved across the city until around midnight. But not everyone agreed with the message. “America voted. America voted for Trump. What is this?” one man asked during the march.

trump-hate

 

Five people were shot in downtown Seattle (at Third Ave. and Pine) around 7  p.m. on Wednesday night. Police do not believe the shooting is related to a protest.

Calling the recent presidential election a “mandate for hate,” Socialist Alternative Seattle organized a protest of Donald Trump the day following his election as president, prompting hundreds to gather and march through downtown Seattle.

The crowd gathered at Westlake Park around 4 p.m., many holding signs that said “Fight Racism,” and chanting “Dump Trump.” There were other chants as well, but they cannot be printed here.

More than 2,200 people responded to the Facebook event Wednesday indicating they plan to attend the demonstration in “mass opposition to Trump and his agenda.”

The organization is the one that spearheaded the campaign to elect Kshama Sawant to Seattle City Council, the first independent socialist in a major U.S. city in decades. The event description adds: “The Democratic Party has proven they are incapable of stopping Trump. The Democratic Party has failed. This is the result of the Democratic Party leadership backing Hillary Clinton instead of Bernie Sanders. It is time to build a new party of the 99 percent.”

Read the whole story here.

DCG

Seattle socialist council member not happy with UW researchers study of impact of $15 minimum-wage law

Remember, Kshama Sawant is a socialist. That leads me to question her objectivity.

sawant

From Seattle Times: Seattle City Councilmember Kshama Sawant is raising concerns about city-commissioned research into Seattle’s landmark minimum-wage law and about public comments by one of the University of Washington professors leading the effort.

Professor Jacob Vigdor and other members of the UW team, who in July published a preliminary report on the impact of the law, are defending their work and saying they don’t control how their comments are presented in the media.

Professor Jacob Vigdor

Professor Jacob Vigdor

The report said Seattle’s labor market thrived after the city became the first major metropolis in the country to enact a law setting its minimum wage on a multiyear path to $15 per hour. It said much of that success can be attributed to trends separate from the law itself, such as the growth of Seattle’s tech sector.

Why all the fuss about a group of number crunchers and their study, which is scheduled to continue for five years? People across the country — including pundits and activists on both sides of the political spectrum — are closely watching what happens in Seattle as they debate whether to raise minimum wages in their own cities and states, and nationwide.

“I’m not only concerned that we’re in danger of drawing erroneous conclusions about Seattle’s minimum-wage increase — I’m concerned about the consequences that could have on the nationwide fight for $15 (per hour),” said Sawant, who holds a doctorate in economics and was an instructor at Seattle Central College before winning office.

In a letter addressed to Vigdor on Tuesday, Sawant questioned the study’s methodology and Vigdor’s objectivity. On the first issue, she attacked the “synthetic Seattle” statistical model that the UW team used to prepare the report.

Socialist Kshama Sawant dares to question someone else's "objectivity"

Socialist Kshama Sawant dares to question someone else’s “objectivity”

To try to isolate the impact of the minimum-wage law from other conditions, the team aggregated ZIP codes from outside the city that had previously shown data and trends similar to ZIP codes inside the city. The team compared what happened in real Seattle from June 2014 through December 2015 to what happened in synthetic Seattle.

“I have strong reservations about the relevance of a model built on geographically and demographically distant ZIP codes,” rather than on ZIP codes just outside the city’s borders, Sawant wrote. She faulted the researchers on other academic grounds, as well, saying they failed to adjust for seasonality and to include chain businesses in the study, for example.

Sawant also went after Vigdor’s comments in the media. “Wages, jobs, hours worked and net business openings all increased in Seattle. Yet you chose to emphasize to the press that employment rates and hours worked went down compared to the fictional synthetic Seattle,” she wrote. “It is professionally irresponsible to draw such a conclusion from the data at this time.” To conclude, Sawant wrote, “Your methodological shortcomings and ideological editorializing undermine the credibility of the report.”

In a letter replying to Sawant on Tuesday, Vigdor and 10 other UW researchers, including several professors, said their work is a collective project.

“The research products generated by the minimum-wage study team are the work of all team members and not one member,” they wrote. “The entire team has participated in discussion around research design, analysis, interpretation and presentation of results. We have taken great care to discuss where we find the evidence most compelling and where we are most uncertain. We believe our report reflects this care and caution.”

The synthetic Seattle approach has been used before for minimum-wage research and is a good approach for various reasons, the team wrote. And besides, the July report had an appendix with the approach Sawant prefers. “None of the conclusions reached in our report are contradicted” by the use of that alternate approach, the team’s letter said.

The researchers admitted to some methodological challenges. But, they wrote, “In the end, we believe that every question or criticism raised in your letter reflects information fully disclosed and discussed in the report itself.”

With regard to Vigdor’s objectivity and comments, the team noted, “Our work product is a public document, subject to partisan interpretation,” and said parts of the report have been used to promote both positive and negative views of Seattle’s law.

The researchers said their comments in the media can be taken out of context. But they said the stories about the July report that have been most misleading have been those written by people who didn’t speak to the team.

In an interview, Vigdor insisted that he’s playing it straight. “We have no ideological commitment,” he said. “We may appear as though we have some ideological slant because we’re not reliably agreeing with anybody.”

The former Duke University professor is an adjunct fellow at the conservative Manhattan Institute and a onetime visiting scholar at the right-leaning American Enterprise Institute. He said that he recently spoke out against American Enterprise Institute scholar Mark Perry’s criticism of Seattle’s minimum-wage law.

“Our entire team is troubled by the high and persistent degree of income inequality in the United States and believe our nation has a moral responsibility to ensure that the fruits of our prosperity are shared equitably,” the UW letter said.

“We are committed to producing objective and rigorous research, however, regardless of our individual preferences or concerns.”

DCG

Socialist Sawant wants to cap fees landlords charge Seattle renters

Is the socialist going to pick up the tab for any unpaid fees? Don’t hold your breath.

Socialist Kshama Sawant

Socialist Kshama Sawant

From the Seattle Times: Seattle City Councilmember Kshama Sawant on Thursday proposed legislation that would put a cap on the amount of money landlords charge incoming renters.

The ordinance would limit move-in fees — including a security deposit and any nonrefundable, one-time payments — to no more than the cost of one month’s rent.

Sawant’s legislation also would require landlords to allow renters to pay their move-in fees in installments rather than immediately and in full. Landlords asking for last month’s rent up front would likewise be required to accept that sum in installments.

The council member said her proposal is aimed at reducing costs for Seattle renters during a time in which many of them are struggling to make ends meet.

“Seattle renters are facing a serious crisis. In May, one-bedroom apartment rentals rose 11 percent, the highest increase in the nation,” Sawant said in a statement, referring to a report by the rental-search website Abodo. “We need to reduce all barriers faced by renters. The cost of moving into a rental unit is first on that list.”

The Abodo report said the price for an average one-bedroom apartment in Seattle rose to $1,906 in May from $1,722 in April. The company’s most recent report said the price for an average one-bedroom in Seattle fell 9 percent from June to July.

Read the whole story here.

See also:

DCG

Will socialist Seattle City Councilmember Kshama Sawant apologize for her claim of anti-Muslim crime?

Don’t hold your breath…

Socialist Kshama Sawant

Socialist Kshama Sawant

Last January, I told you about socialist Seattle Council member Kshama Sawant and how she claimed that the death of a teen muslim, Hamza Warsame, was a hate crime caused by anti-Muslim sentiment in Seattle.

Claims were made that Warsame was allegedly beaten and thrown from the building in Capitol Hill, Sawant issued a statement calling for “justice.” Even though no foul play was found to have incurred, Sawant told KIRO Radio’s Jason Rantz that her point remains valid.

“At that time, when (victim Hanza Warsame) unfortunately met his demise, Islamophobia the rhetoric was heated,” Sawant said. “(Donald) Trump was really stirring it up. The attacks had just happened. Bernardino had just happened. There was a lot of buzz about that. At that moment it was understandable that the communities in Seattle were anxious that this might be motivated by that kind of hatred against immigrants, against people of color, against people of a certain ethnicity,” Sawant added. “And what I said in my statement is that the police should conduct a thorough investigation, and if the death to Hamza was linked to a hate crime then the police should carry out the full justice process in order to get those perpetrators to justice. So what I said was conditional.

In early December the King County Medical Examiner announced that investigators determined the fall was an accident.

Well, guess what? According to the Seattle Times, a report released yesterday by the Seattle Police Department reveals that Warsame’s death was an accident.

warsame1

Here’s what happened: The 16-year-old Seattle Central College student had gone to a schoolmate’s tiny apartment to work on a project on homelessness, according to the report.

Video surveillance shows the teen and his 21-year-old classmate entering the building around 2:30 p.m. The two went to the older student’s sixth-floor apartment, where police later saw what appeared to be legally purchased marijuana and a bong, the report says. Warsame told his schoolmate he had never smoked marijuana and would like to try it, and the two smoked together, according to the report.

A toxicology screen by the medical examiner found “relatively high levels” of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the main psychoactive constituent in marijuana, in Warsame’s system.

SJWs agitating before knowing all the facts

SJWs agitating before knowing all the facts

The older student told police he thought everything was fine and went to cook some food, but that Warsame then grew “frantic.” The teen then started talking in agitation about his religion and how he might have put himself in bad standing, and then said he “needed air,” police said. Warsame opened the door and was off the balcony before his schoolmate could react, the report says.

Almost immediately after news of Warsame’s death spread, rumors about an anti-Muslim assault began to circulate on social media. Seattle City Councilwoman Kshama Sawant joined the fray, calling for an investigation into the death.

On her blog, she wrote that anti-Muslim rhetoric had spiked after recent terrorist attacks in Paris and San Bernardino, Calif. “Some reports suggest he was beaten and thrown from the building in an Islamophobic attack by a fellow student,” she wrote.

Sawant asked why Muslims were being targeted and said, “We must come together as a community, united and clear that we will not stand for any threats or hate violence toward our Muslim brothers and sisters.”

According to Seattle police detectives, there was no sign of a struggle in the apartment of the 21-year-old. Police interviewed the neighbor in the apartment below, who told them she was usually able to hear some things that happened in the upstairs apartment quite well, even making out specific words. But she did not hear any fighting or struggling on the day Warsame died, according to the police report.

Police said the medical examiner concluded Warsame’s death was an accident after learning that an adjacent building, at 510 E. Thomas St., was only 11 feet away from the Summit Avenue building from which the teen plummeted. Police said Warsame was 1.5 feet short of reaching the other building’s roof.

DCG