Tag Archives: Korean War

Tucker Carlson interviews Deirdre Griswold, a DPRK sympathizer

I watched this last night and was just amazed at this woman that Tucker interviewed.

Her name is Deirdre Griswold and here’s what Wikipedia says about her:

“Deirdre Griswold is a former candidate for President of the United States. Griswold ran in the 1980 as the nominee of the communist Workers World Party. Her running mate was Gavrielle Holmes.

She is the daughter of Vincent Copeland (deceased in 1993, at 77), one of the founders of the party. Her mother, Elizabeth Ross Copeland, and paternal aunt, Cynthia Cochran, were also communists.”

You’ve got to see what she had to say about North Korea. Her segment starts at the 2:34 mark.

I knew that there were blind and fanatical die-hard progressives/commies. I have just never heard one such as this. Scary!

DCG

A Hero to Remember: Sgt. Reckless

reckless2

While watching the American Heroes Channel, we came upon a documentary about Sergeant Reckless, a horse for the United States Marine Corps that served in the Korean War. I’m surprised I’d never heard of her before and thought I’d share the story here.

reckless

From Wikipedia:

Sergeant Reckless, a horse that held official rank in the United States military, was a mare of Mongolian horse breeding. Out of a race horse dam, she was purchased in October 1952 for $250 from a Korean stableboy at the Seoul racetrack who needed money to buy an artificial leg for his sister. Reckless was bought by members of the United States Marine Corps and trained to be a pack horse for the Recoilless Rifle Platoon, Anti-Tank Company, 5th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division. She quickly became a unit mascot and was allowed to roam freely through camp, entering the marines’ tents, where she would sleep on cold nights, and was known for her willingness to eat nearly anything, including scrambled eggs, beer, coca-cola and, once, about $30 worth of poker chips.

She served in numerous combat actions during the Korean War, carrying supplies and ammunition, and was also used to evacuate wounded. Learning each supply route after only a couple of trips, she often traveled to deliver supplies to the troops on her own, without benefit of a handler. The highlight of her nine-month military career came in late March 1953 during fighting around Vegas Hill when, in a single day, she made 51 solo trips to resupply multiple front line units. She was wounded in combat twice, given the battlefield rank of corporal in 1953, and then a battlefield promotion to sergeant in 1954, several months after the war ended. She also became the first horse in the Marine Corps known to have participated in an amphibious landing, and following the war was awarded two Purple Hearts, a Marine Corps Good Conduct Medal and several other military honors.

reckless3

Reckless’s baptism under fire came at a place called Hedy’s Crotch, near the villages of Changdan and Kwakchan. Though loaded down with six recoilless rifle shells, she initially “went straight up” and all four feet left the ground the first time the recoilless rifle was fired. When she landed she started shaking, but Coleman, her handler, calmed her down. The second time the gun fired she merely snorted, and by the end of the mission that day appeared calm and was seen trying to eat a discarded helmet liner. She even appeared to take an interest in the operation of the weapon. When learning a new delivery route, Reckless would only need someone to lead her a few times. Afterwards she would make the trips on her own.”

To learn more about Sgt. Reckless (and buy a book about her if you so desire), go here.

“She wasn’t a horse — she was a Marine!”

DCG

North Korea’s leader Kim Jong Un had his uncle fed to 120 ravenous dogs

Simply put, we have in North Korea, a psychopathic country ruled by a sick and evil psychopath.

Lest we forget, the U.S. and North Korea are technically still in a state of war. The Korean War (1950-53) ended with a cease fire; there never was a peace treaty signed. Today, the U.S. still maintains a “forward presence” on the Korean peninsula, with 28,500 American soldiers, sailors, airmen, and Marines stationed in South Korea.

H/t FOTM’s joworth

 

~Eowyn

Consortium of Defense Analysts

Jang and KimJang Song Thaek (in red circle); Kim Jong Un (in yellow circle)

Ching Cheong reports for The Straits Times, Dec. 24, 2013, that North Korea leader Kim Jong Un‘s execution of his uncle and No. 2 man, , took Beijing by surprise and will adversely affect bilateral relations. Jang was known for his close ties with Beijing.

Beijing expressed their displeasure of Kim through the publication of a detailed account of Jang’s brutal execution in Wen Wei Po, the Chinese government’s official mouthpiece in Hong Kong, on Dec 12.

According to the report, unlike previous executions of political prisoners which were carried out by firing squads with machine guns, Jang was stripped naked and thrown into a cage, along with his five closest aides. There, the six men were eaten by 120 ravenous hounds who had been starved for three days. The Chinese call it quan jue

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Veterans Day Tribute

A War Hero Named Reckless

There is a great war hero who is listed alongside George Washington and Thomas Jefferson as one of the top 100 heroes of all time.

But this hero is not human.

This great hero was a Mongolian mare — a horse named Reckless.

Reckless was a pack horse during the terrible Korean war, and she carried recoilless rifles, ammunition and supplies to Marines.  Nothing too unusual about that, lots of animals got pressed into doing pack chores in many wars.

But this horse did something more. During the battle for a location called Outpost Vegas, Reckless made 51 trips up and down the hill, on the way up she carried ammunition, and on the way down she carried wounded soldiers.

What was so amazing? Well, she made every one of those trips without anyone leading her. 

One can imagine a horse carrying a wounded soldier, being smacked on the rump at the top  of the hill, and heading back to the  “safety” of the rear. But to imagine the same horse, loaded with ammunition, and trudging back to the battle where artillery is going off, without anyone leading her is unbelievable. To know that she would make 50 of those trips is unheard of. How many horses would even make it back to the barn once, let alone return to the soldiers in the field even a single time?

Here is a clip of her story and photos to prove where she was and what she did.

For her heroism, Reckless was twice promoted — first to Sergeant, then to Staff Sergeant by the Commandant of the U.S. Marine Corps.

Reckless was retired at the Marine Corps Base in Camp Pendleton where a General issued the following order: “She was never to carry any more weight on her back except her own blankets.” This great valiant creature died in 1968 at the age of 20.

Please go to http://www.sgtreckless.com for more information, and join the official Sgt Reckless Fan Club on Facebook.

H/t my dear friend Sol.

~Eowyn

A Hero to Remember

An American Hero

My father served in the US Navy and was involved in both the Vietnam and Korean Wars.  My father was my hero growing up (most of the time!), raised me as a conservative, and taught me the difference between right and wrong.  He also shared a story with me of his hero, Slade Deville Cutter.  I would like to share his story with you.

My father was a Recruit Chief Petty Officer of Company 497 and completed his US Navy training in San Diego (my father is on the front right). The training was brutal – it involved “gunnery” training (doesn’t sound that bad to me!) and practice run-throughs of the “gas chamber” (that sounds brutal!).

Photo of my dad taken by Captain Slade Cutter on 27 May 1960

My father then went on to serve on the USS Neosho . It was there he met his hero, Captain Slade Cutter.

Slade Cutter was ‘da man. He was a career US Naval Officer and was awarded four Navy Crosses and tied for 2nd place for Japanese ships sunk during World War II. My dad shared the following with me:

“I spent about 2 1/2 years on The USS Neosho, some with Slade Cutter as Captain and some with Reuben Whitaker as Captain. Both were famous and excellent World War II submarine captains.  The only bad feature about the Neosho was no air conditioning! The air search radar was obsolete, but our radar repeaters and communications equipment were good. Most importantly, we respected and admired our Captain Cutter.  He was a man of courage.”

“Cutter was really concerned about the welfare of his crew.  (Dad presumed it came from the fact that he survived so many attacks.)  His crew always came first.  The better the performance of the people on the ship, the better chance they had of surviving.

Cutter’s four war patrols as Commanding Officer of the USS Seahorse netted 19 sinkings and more than 70,000 tons of shipping in the postwar accounting. Cutter succeeded in sinking 9 vessels in enemy Japanese-controlled waters during a Second Water Patrol.  He also succeeded in delivering damaging torpedo attacks against heavily escorted enemy convoys. On one occasion, it was necessary to pursue an enemy convoy over a period of 80 hours and only by exceptional determination and skill was Cutter able to penetrate the escort screen and sink two freighters.

Captain Cutter once stated, “The Seahorse sank 19 enemy ships during the four war patrols I was the skipper. The crew got the job done. I was merely the coordinator. They were brave and talented, and I never had to be reckless.  I thought of the lives of those fine men, and frankly, I was aboard too.

Spoken like a true hero.

DCG

North Korea Prepares For War

By now, you must have heard/read about what happened last Tuesday in the Korean peninsula.

On November 23, 2010, the looney regime in Pyongyang bombarded an island near the disputed sea border between North and South Korea, killing at least two South Korean marines, injuring 15 soldiers and 3 civilians, setting dozens of buildings ablaze and sending civilians fleeing for shelter. The extent of casualties on the northern side is unknown.

South Koreans watch the North Korean commies shelling Yeonpyeong island

The clash, which put South Korea’s military on high alert, was one of the rivals’ most dramatic confrontations since the Korean War ended in 1953 with a truce but without an armistice or peace treaty.

The skirmish began when Pyongyang warned the South to halt military drills in the area, according to South Korean officials. When Seoul refused and began firing artillery into disputed waters, albeit away from the North Korean shore, the North retaliated by bombarding the small island of Yeonpyeong, which houses South Korean military installations and a small civilian population. Yeonpyeong is only 7 miles from, and within sight of, the North Korean mainland.  In all, North Korea fired dozens of rounds of artillery in three separate barrages that began in the mid-afternoon, while South Korea returned fire with about 80 rounds.

Since then, both sides are vowing retaliation, while the United States has condemned Pyongyang’s bombardment as “a provocative, outrageous attack.” A U.S. aircraft carrier strike group set off for Korean waters Wednesday after Obama pledged America would stand “shoulder to shoulder” with South Korea and stage joint military exercises in response.

The U.S. military is already stretched thin in Afghanistan and Iraq (still), and we can ill afford — in both manpower and dollars — to fight yet another war. So I’ve been watching events since Tuesday, hoping that tensions will die down. Alas, the latest news is ominous: North Korea is recalling its expatriates from Russia, in preparation for war.

And who do we have in the White House? None other than a Commander In Chief who can’t even throw a ball like a man. Meanwhile, the American sheeple are in a post-Thanksgiving shopping frenzy (let’s accumulate even more credit-card debt!), oblivious to the mounting tensions in Asia and in denial about America’s stalled economic “recovery.”

~Eowyn


Expats recalled as North Korea prepares for war

 By Shaun Walker in Moscow – The Independent – Nov 27, 2010

A mass exodus of North Korean workers from the Far East of Russia is under way, according to reports coming out of the region. As the two Koreas edged towards the brink of war this week, it appears that the workers in Russia have been called back to aid potential military operations. Vladnews agency, based in Vladivostok, reported that North Korean workers had left the town of Nakhodka en masse shortly after the escalation of tension on the Korean peninsula earlier this week. “Traders have left the kiosks and markets, workers have abandoned building sites, and North Korean secret service employees working in the region have joined them and left,” the agency reported.

Russia’s migration service said that there were over 20,000 North Koreans in Russia at the beginning of 2010, of which the vast majority worked in construction. The workers are usually chaperoned by agents from Kim Jong-il’s security services and have little contact with the world around them. Defectors have suggested that the labourers work 13-hour days and that most of their pay is sent back to the government in Pyongyang. Hundreds of workers have fled the harsh conditions and live in hiding in Russia, constantly in fear of being deported back to North Korea. “North Korea’s government sends thousands of its citizens to Russia to earn money, most of which is funnelled through government accounts,” says Simon Ostrovsky, a journalist who discovered secret North Korean logging camps in the northern Siberian taiga. “Workers are often sent to remote locations for years at a time to work long hours and get as little as three days off per year.”

Now it appears that some kind of centralised order has been given for the workers to return home. Russia’s Pacific port of Vladivostok is thousands of miles and seven time zones from Moscow, but only around 100 miles from the country’s heavily controlled border with North Korea. In 1996, a diplomat from the South Korean consulate in the city was murdered with a poisoned pencil, in what was widely believed to be a hit carried out by the North’s secret agents. There are even two North Korean restaurants in the city. It is not known how many of the workers in other Russian towns have been called back to their homeland this week, or whether the exodus is permanent or temporary.