Tag Archives: King County

Rape, strangulation and assault: Three attacks by homeless people in Seattle in less than a month

jenny durkan

In November 2015 the former mayor of Seattle, homosexual Ed Murray, declared a state of emergency in Seattle due to the homelessness situation. At that time, there was an estimated 10,000 people living on the streets. Fast-forward to May 2018 and the number of homeless people has increased to over 12,100.

The city has a very lax policy in allowing the homeless to commit drug offenses. The homeless openly use and drug dealers are frequently spotted at homeless hangouts. The city even allows drug use at some homeless shelters.

Now the homeless have become more brazen with their criminal activities. No amount of tax payer dollars is going to solve the problem until Seattle officials stop coddling these individuals.

From MyNorthwest.com: Police report there’s been another assault from a man, believed to be homeless, against innocent passers-by, this time a father and his daughter walking to the Cinerama in Belltown on Father’s Day.

The unidentified victims were on their way to a screening of “The Incredibles 2” when the suspect, David Ailep, allegedly followed the pair as they walked down the sidewalk. When the female victim tried to walk away from Ailep, he said to her “why are you laughing at me” and “stop laughing at me.” She wasn’t laughing at him.

According to the police report, obtained by KTTH 770 AM, she asked Ailep to get away from her, but he refused:

“She observed that Ailep had his right hand in his pocket (she noted that it looked like was holding a knife in his hand covered by his jacket pocket) and his left hand was up and back in a striking position like he was going to hit her,” the report says. “She feared that he was going to strike her, and she decided to pull out her ASP baton from her purse to defend herself.”

The female victim screamed at him to get away from her, but he refused, grabbing both of her arms, and rattling her back and forth until he was able to take the baton from her, according to the police documents. She yelled out in pain.

At this point, her father became aware of the assault and jumped into help, tackling Ailep to the ground. While on the ground, according to the police report, Ailep swung the baton at the father, hitting him “directly on the forehead” leaving a “visible swollen laceration” from the baton strike.

After police arrived in the area of the 9-1-1 call, they spotted a suspect matching Ailep’s description. When the two officers attempted to make contact with Ailep, he sprinted away on foot and, “without any instruction given to him,” laid on the ground to be detained.

One of the officers observed Ailep to be under the influence of drugs. He said Ailep had a difficult time staying focused, and appeared frantic and “in a complete stand of delusion or delirium.”

During the interview, he made random statements to the officer like “what’s in your sink man” and “I take showers.” He repeated random statements like “easy” and “twelve, thirteen, twenty-two.” The police report claims he “appeared to be suffering from the effects of a powerful psychedelic and or stimulant narcotic…” and claimed he performed oral sex for drugs. While he claimed his pockets were empty, a search found a folding knife, a cell phone, and a wallet that didn’t belong to him.

After his arrest for felony assault and theft, a King County Intake nurse advised Ailep was not suffering from mental illness but was “extremely intoxicated” from a stimulant narcotic. While the Seattle Police Department hasn’t confirmed Ailep is homeless, a source suggested they believe him to be.

This is the third high-profile homeless attack on a passerby in the last several weeks, with a rape in Ballard and a strangling of a tourist near the Space Needle occurring within weeks of each other. These incidents are occurring as Mayor Jenny Durkan asks for community support to place tiny home villages in residential neighborhoods. The South Lake Union village may be low barrier, which would allow someone like Ailep the ability to keep his drugs in his home.

See also:

DCG

Seattle to help the homeless safely inject drugs with medical mobile unit

mobile medical unit

King County’s medical mobile unit

Seattle’s homeless crisis is exacerbated by the fact that the local area politicians and government officials believe that enabling an addiction is part of the solution.

Taxpayers are coughing up MILLIONS of dollars to provide assistance to those in need. Yet many of the homeless don’t want help any help.

The inhabitant of the “tent mansion” near Seattle Center has refused help from the city, choosing instead to live on the street, than follow the rules of a shelter. She said, “We don’t want to change our lifestyle to fit their requirements. We intend to stay here. This is the solution to the homeless problem. We want autonomy, right here.”

The Pierce County Sheriff’s Office recently offered to help the homeless at an encampment. They brought in agencies to offer services and help with drug addiction. Out of the 50 campers there only one accepted the assistance.

King County already offers medical mobile units.

Yet Seattle, which recently approved a business “head tax” to solve their homeless crisis, is going ahead with their medical mobile unit. Guess they have to spend their recently-acquired taxpayer dollars somewhere.

From MyNorthwest.com: Seattle council members are looking to get around the dilemma of where to place a safe injection site by making it mobile. The city is now exploring what Human Services Department spokesperson Meg Olberding describes as a “large mobile medical van.”

The van would be akin to the medical RVs the county and city currently use to serve homeless residents. KIRO 7 reports that they will be much larger, however.  The option is referred to as “fixed-mobile.” A medical van would park at a fixed location, but return to a secure location every night.

“It is an option where we would actually lease or go into an agreement regarding a fixed site, and then with that, we would have a mobile van,” said Dr. Jeffrey Duchin, Health Officer for Public Health Seattle-King County. “… this is potentially a very large vehicle that we would then house the consumption activity in.”

The mobile van would offer consumption booths and recovery space. According to Q13, the safe injection van would cost about $350,000; along with $1.8 million to get the van set up, and $2.5 million to operate it. Seattle has already set aside some money for a safe injection program and the van could be paid for from those funds.

“Obviously, there will continue to be concerns about the neighborhood, security of the neighborhood, about other activities happening in the neighborhood, so we would want to make sure we provide a safe area, not only for the neighbors but for the individuals who are using as well,” Duchin told the council.

The mobile option faces a similar issue that a fixed site does — where to park it. One thing is clear, the council doesn’t want to wait much longer. Councilmember Teresa Mosqueda said that she favors purchasing a van. The city would then conduct community outreach for potential locations.

“Every day we don’t move forward, people are at risk for overdose and death, so with that in mind and with this sense of urgency for the third time this year alone that you have heard us express this, I am calling on our mayor and our county as a whole to act with urgency so we can move forward this year,” Mosqueda said. “We have the resources in hand; we have the support from the broad public, and we have data-driven solutions.”

(I have researched the validity of safe injection sites and there is a very mixed reaction as to whether or not they work. One can easily choose the data that supporst their opinion.)

“This is a data-driven, public health harm reduction model that is proven to be effective at saving lives and getting people into treatment,” she said.

The city will spend the next two months considering potential locations to park the van (so much for that “sense of urgency”). Officials favor a private lot, and note that most drug activity happens around SoDo, downtown, and the west side of Capital Hill, according to KIRO 7. The city did consider buying property specifically for the van, but found that it was “cost restrictive” inside Seattle.

Read the whole story here.


Enslaving drug users only perpetuates the cycle. And it keeps the taxpayer money flowing to develop more “solutions.”

DCG

#WaronWomen: King County judge allows alleged rapist & registered sex offender to walk out on $1 bail

john chun

King County Superior Court Judge John Chun

What a slap to the face for this rape victim.

About the judge, John Chun, who granted the $1 bail for this homeless criminal:

  • He was appointed by Gov. Jay Inslee (D) in December 2013
  • He served as a law clerk for the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals
  • Rated Exceptionally Well Qualified by the King County Washington Women Lawyers in 2013
  • Rated Well Qualified by the Joint Asian Judicial Evaluations Committee in 2013
  • Rated Exceptionally Well Qualified by Q-Law: the LGBT Bar Association Judicial Evaluation Committee in 2013
  • Rated Exceptionally Well Qualified by the Latina/o Bar Association of Washington in 2014

From MyNorthwest.com: A man who allegedly kidnapped a woman in downtown Seattle and raped her 11 years ago walked out of the King County Superior Court on $1 bail this week.

KIRO Radio reporter Hanna Scott told KIRO Radio’s Dori Monson that according to court documents, a man identified as Johnny Lee Lay and an accomplice allegedly abducted a woman from Second Avenue and Pike Street in a Cadillac in 2007.

Lay purportedly raped the woman in the backseat of the car, before taking to her a homeless camp outside of town and raping her a second time. He told the woman that he wanted her to work as a prostitute for him. When she responded that he would have to kill her first, he held a screwdriver to her head, threatening her with it.

After the men let her go, the woman went to the police and was given a rape kit. However, the kit was not submitted for testing until 2016 — nearly a decade after the rape.

According to Scott, this is just one of thousands of instances in which a rape kit has waited years to go to the lab.

“That was going on forever in our state — it was up to each individual police department when, or if, they would submit these, at all,” Scott said.

Scott further explained that the woman had learned the suspect’s name when she saw his ID fall out of the seat in the car. The man told her that he would kill her if she told anyone about him, but she went to the police anyway.

According to records, Lay, 48, has a long criminal history.

“Johnny Lay is a pretty much chronically homeless person,” Scott said. “He lived here in King County for a long time, had major issues with crack cocaine and other drugs. He is also a registered sex offender.

In 2001, then 28-year-old Lay was convicted of third-degree sexual assault with a 14-year-old girl. He is currently registered as a child sex offender in Illinois, where he is listed as homeless.

When Lay appeared in court on Monday charged with first-degree sexual assault, prosecutors were seeking $500,000 bail based on his list of past convictions. Lay’s attorney, however, used the state’s delay in testing the rape evidence in the suspect’s favor.

“The defense attorney’s argument was, ‘Look, you can’t say he poses this danger to the community when you waited this many years,’” Scott explained.

King County Superior Court Judge John Chun granted Lay $1 bail.

As per court orders, Lay must check in with the Community Corrections Alternative Program on a daily basis and cannot get within 500 feet of the alleged victim. Lay’s next appearance in court is scheduled for Tuesday, June 19.


Remember ladies of Seattle: While judges allow perps like this to roam free the local politicians are trying to weaken your right to protect yourself.

DCG

Shocker, not: New homeless count in King County shows spike in number of people sleeping outside

king county homeless2

Homeless in Seattle…

You know what that means: The local governments are going to need more taxpayer dollars!

From Spokesman Review: For the first time, King County’s annual one-night count of homelessness found more than half of homeless people were sleeping outside versus in shelter, with a stark increase in the number of vehicle campers.

With pressure to show progress on the homelessness crisis, the county on Thursday announced an overall 4 percent increase in the annual snapshot count of homeless people, to 12,112.

The count, conducted in January, found a worsening problem of people living in tent camps, cars, RVs and the street compared to last year. More than 70 percent of the county’s unsheltered homeless people were in Seattle.

The Seattle TimesProject Homeless is funded by The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Campion Foundation, the Paul G. Allen Family Foundation, Raikes Foundation, Schultz Family Foundation, Seattle Foundation, Seattle Mariners, and Starbucks. The Seattle Times maintains editorial control over Project Homeless content.· Find out more about Project Homeless.

As Seattle and the county’s declared state of emergency on homelessness enters a THIRD year, the one-night numbers are sure to roil an already heated debate about how to better respond.

Compared to more rapid rises in homeless counts over the past five years, a slower 4 percent increase represents progress, said Kyra Zylstra, interim director of All Home, the county’s homelessness coordinating agency, which organizes the yearly count.

“It’s not the kind of progress we all want to see,” Zylstra said. “But our performance data shows that the resources that we are investing in are housing people faster.”

The increase in people living outside includes 370 residents of Seattle’s six sanctioned tent camps. They are counted as “unsheltered” because federal guidelines do not recognize sanctioned tent camps as shelter.

The new homelessness figure points to some gains, including significant drops in the numbers of homeless veterans and families. Zylstra credited rapid rehousing, which provides rental assistance, with helping more people find stable housing.

Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan said the results point toward a need for greater regional collaboration.

“We must continue to take urgent action on the homelessness crisis with holistic, regional solutions,” she said in a released statement,” Durkan said. “The reduction in veterans who are experiencing homelessness shows we can have an impact with focused strategies. But there is much work to be done”

Overall, about two-thirds of homeless people in the county are men, and more than three-quarters lived in households without children. There were also signs of homelessness worsening outside of Seattle, with increases in people living outside in north and east King County.

The results come at a critical time. Seattle’s new business head tax, which will charge large businesses $275 per worker to fund homeless services and affordable housing, spotlighted a struggle to find the right balance between long- and short-term strategies. The business community has organized an effort to repeal it.

In the midst of that debate, a task force on homelessness, called One Table, has had delays in recommending more countywide, comprehensive strategies.

Read the rest of the story here.

See my many other blog posts on Seattle’s homeless crisis:

DCG

Lenient drug use policies and lax enforcement in the Pacific Northwest are endangering children

needles in snohomish county herald net photo

Needle cleanup in Snohomish County, Washington/Herald Net photo

In February, Snohomish County (north of King County – Seattle area) announced that drug users would get a pass if they’re busted with less than 2 grams of any drug. Apparently the county doesn’t have enough prosecutors to take on these cases.

Just before Snohomish County announced this, the King County Prosecutor’s Office announced that they were cutting loose about 1,500 misdemeanor cases from 2017 due to staffing shortages. An anonymous police officer in King County — going under the Reddit handle of “BummedCop” — noted that charges ranging from criminal trespass to theft, vehicle prowls, and possession of stolen property would be dismissed.

Until recently, Snohomish County allowed drug consumption sites at supervised drug facilities. In March, the county council approved an ordinance that permanently bans drug consumption sites. From MyNorthwest.com:

“The permanent ban follows a six-month moratorium on drug consumption sites that county officials passed in September 2017. The council used the time to codify a permanent ban.

“We want to get out ahead of the game and make sure we’re not having these safe injection sites anywhere near Snohomish County,” Councilmember Nate Nehring said in September.”

Meanwhile in King County they are working on providing “safe injection sites” for drug users. After studying the issue for almost a year and a half, county and city officials believe that the need for these sites exists yet have not formally decided on any locations. The task force does suggest six different options ranging from $350,000 to $5 million to start with close to $4 million in annual costs.

Seattle has also considered “safe consumption sites” where people can inject and smoke illegal drugs under medical supervision.

The drug use is so rampant in Snohomish County that at the end of 2017, over ONE MILLION used syringes were collected during the previous six months by a Snohomish County needle exchange program. From Herald Net:

Strayneedles have become a symptom and a symbol of the nationwide opioid crisis. Recovering addicts spent days cleaning nine tons of garbage and thousands of heroin needles from their former home, a patch of woods behind a Home Depot south of Everett.

Robert Smiley stayed in the camp years ago, when he abused alcohol and smoked crack. He dumped a bucket of 7,624 needles onto a tarp Monday, to show how many carpeted the ground days ago.

“All I know is this doesn’t need to be your neighborhood anymore,” Smiley said to an audience of volunteers, as they celebrated the progress of their cleanup at a barbecue Monday.

Smiley, 53, leads the Hand Up Project, a nonprofit that seeks to get people off the streets, into detox and into sober housing. Many of the volunteers are recovering addicts who lived in the camp in the past. Now they want to make things right, in a neighborhood plagued by drugs and related crime.

The city of Everett (in Snohomish County) provides free taxpayer-funded needle clean-up kits to Snohomish County residents and business owners so they can clean up needles found in the community. The kits include a sharps container, puncture proof gloves, safety glasses, tongs, hand sanitizer and simple instructions for safe collection.

And what is the result of lax drug-use policies and non-enforcement? Children are routinely encountering needles in parks/playgrounds/streets throughout Snohomish and King counties.

Last week a toddler was pricked by a dirty needle in an Everett playground.  MyNorthwest.com reports that the babysitter, Dana Smith, heard a scream. “The way he was screaming, he’s never screamed like that,” Smith said. “It was so scary and he was hysterical.”

The babysitter looked through the mulch and found a needle that appeared to be half used and filled with a brown substance. After safely retrieving it, she took the boy to the hospital.

Seattle’s Cal Anderson Park has become notorious for drug use. There are so many instances of children finding needles that a mom created a “See a Needle” web site to teach parents/kids/teachers what to do if they encounter needles.

In downtown Seattle, a mom took her three-year-old to see the Hello Kitty exhibit at the Experience Music Project (EMP). She turned her back for a second and the child had a syringe in her hand.

Syringes have been found in Les Grove Park in Auburn (King County), which has become a haven for homeless and drugs. A mom says she’s found dozens of used needles inside the park, including one that was just finger deep in a sandbox.

A public path near a Seattle elementary school had to be closed due to people repeatedly finding needles there. The public path is used by people to camp there and inject drugs. According to an elementary school PTA member, along with finding used needles, condoms and human waste is also a common site.

Needles are also prevalent on the east side of King County. Bothell Police tweeted about what to do when you encounter a needle in a park. Their most recent tweet about needles on April 24:

Heading to a park/playground to enjoy the sun? Unfortunately that means some kids may come across discarded needles. What should you do if you see a discarded needle or drug paraphernalia? Thanks to Daisy’s wonderful artwork, we have an idea. – Don’t Touch – Mark it – Call 911.”

I understand that the opioid crisis is a contributing factor to children finding needles. King County does as well and in January they filed a lawsuit against Purdue Pharma, the company behind the painkiller OxyContin, blaming the company of fueling the opioid epidemic there.  The suit also alleges “the opioid epidemic has contributed significantly to the homelessness crisis in King County.”

More about the lawsuit from KIRO TV:

The lawsuit descries describes deplorable conditions in parks, including syringes found daily this summer on a children’s play area at a park in White Center, used needles daily on ball fields, and homeless encampments filled with human waste that destroyed years of environmental restoration work.

The court filing provides the most vivid details released to the public about the extent of the problem. 

But even if King County wins the suit, a financial gain from the lawsuit is likely years away – and it’s not clear how county officials can adequately address the exploding problem of homelessness, biohazardous waste and syringes that often create a public safety risk. 

The lawsuit states that tens of thousands of needles still litter local parks, putting staff at risk and requiring them to provide reduced services to park-goers to avoid the chance of injury. Sheriff’s deputies and Metro employees also are repeatedly exposed to dangers, and Metro has collected more than 650 pounds of the roughly pen-size needles since 2013.”

The Pacific Northwest/Seattle area has been trying to address the opioid and homeless crisis for many, many years. And they have spent millions and millions of dollars.

Yet it is NEVER enough taxpayer dollars.

When you allow the homeless and junkies to freely shoot up with no criminal consequences you end up with discarded needles. Needles that become a public safety issue.

What do you want to bet another tax will be the next solution?

DCG

Report finds that King County needs to spend $410 million a year to solve homeless crisis

homeless in seattle

The result of progressive policies: The new King County/Seattle area…

king county homeless2.jpg

king county homeless

I’ve done many posts on King County/Seattle’s homeless problem and how the local governments plan to solve this issue with more taxpayer money. See the following:

The City of Seattle spent $54 million on the homeless last year. King County spent over $195 million. There are an estimated 11,643 homeless people in King County. And according to a King County Auditor’s report, “the region’s leaders fail to communicate well enough to make any progress, and affordability continues to prevent people from overcoming homelessness.”

The real solution now proposed: Taxpayers are going to have to cough up a lot more money. I guarantee you it still won’t be enough.

From Seattle Times: Seattle and King County could make the homelessness services system run like a fined-tuned machine (HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA), but without dramatically increasing the region’s supply of affordable housing options, solving the region’s homelessness crisis is all but impossible.

That is the central finding of a new, independent analysis of King County’s homelessness crisis by the consulting firm McKinsey & Company, which produced the report pro bono for the Seattle Metropolitan Chamber of Commerce.

The report estimates King County is short up to 14,000 units affordable for people experiencing homelessness. Because of the gap, and the rising numbers of people who are homeless, annual spending — public, private or both — needs to double to $410 million if the problem is to be solved, according to the report.

And that’s only if the annual rate of people becoming homeless doesn’t increase.

“This is a supply-side issue,” said Dilip Wagle, a McKinsey senior partner based in Seattle. “We are just running out of affordable housing units.”

The startling findings come as Seattle engages in a furious public debate over the city’s proposed plan to impose a $75 million annual tax on its largest businesses — including Amazon — to pay for more affordable housing and services for the homeless.

The chamber has vigorously fought the tax, so the McKinsey report results — produced independently of the chamber — may contradict their stance.

Chamber president and CEO Marilyn Strickland said she agrees more affordable housing is needed, but argues the so-called head tax is not the answer. She added that the chamber does not feel like what McKinsey produced was their report.

“We have record revenues, we have record tax collection,” Strickland said. “If building were more of a priority, they (the City Council) should make it one and make it one now.”

But Seattle Councilmember M. Lorena González, after reading details of the report in The Seattle Times, pushed back against the chamber’s assertion that the current spending on homelessness is enough, when this analysis proves that it isn’t, she said.

“It is an untenable position that the chamber is taking to acknowledge there is an affordable housing problem while at the same time offering nothing other than a continuing chorus of no’s,” said González, who received a high-level briefing about the report a few weeks ago but was scheduled to have a meeting with McKinsey on the report details Friday.

From what she knew about the analysis so far, González said the research seemed to validate “what the advocates and the nonprofit housing developers have been telling us for quite some time now.”

McKinsey approached the chamber last fall, and produced the analysis in a matter of months. Among other findings in the report:

  • Recent improvements in King County’s homelessness-response system have resulted in more exits to housing, increasing by 35 percent between 2016 and last year. But, while helpful, that alone cannot make up for the region’s affordable housing shortage.
  • “There’s not a ton of more juice to squeeze on efficiencies in the (homeless) crisis-response system,” said Maggie Stringfellow, a McKinsey associate partner in Seattle.
  • There is a 96 percent statistical correlation between the region’s rent increases and the increase in homelessness, a finding that echoes an analysis by Zillow Research, which found those relationships strong in Seattle, Los Angeles, New York and Washington, D.C.

While McKinsey can’t say that higher rents directly cause more people to lose their homes, the two have “risen together in lockstep,” Stringfellow said.

McKinsey found the correlation between opioid deaths and homelessness to be far lower, at 34 percent — an indication that, counter to some assumptions, drug use alone isn’t driving the dramatic rise in homelessness here.

A separate, unrelated report, released Wednesday by the Seattle and King County Public Health Department, found that drug and alcohol overdoses disproportionally impacted people experiencing homelessness.

Read the whole story here.

DCG

King County Elections wants pre-paid postage for mail-in ballots

Judge Judy shakes head rolls eyes

Just a thought: If you can’t figure out how to get a stamp and that’s the only thing that makes it “easier” for you to vote, you probably shouldn’t be voting.

From Seattle Times: King County voters might no longer have to worry about finding stamps for their ballots.

Prepaid postage for the county’s mail-in ballots could happen as soon as the Aug. 7 primary if the King County Metropolitan Council approves a supplemental budget request to fund the change. Adopting the request would cost about $191,000 this year and approximately $250,000 annually, said Julie Wise, King County elections director. The county will not be charged for ballots not mailed. Postage would run 50 cents per piece for the county.

Wise, who has worked for the elections division since 2000, has long wanted to send voters prepaid ballots. One of the first things she and County Executive Dow Constantine discussed after her election as director in 2015 was getting prepaid postage on ballots.

“The first thing he said was, ‘Let’s do prepaid ballots, but first let’s make sure this works, and we don’t negatively impact voters,’” she recalled him saying.

Wise moved cautiously to ensure a prepaid postage system could work. The first test happened last year with three special elections in Maple Valley, Shoreline and Vashon Island. She wanted to see how it worked with the post office, and if it increased voter turnout. Shoreline saw a 10 percent increase in voter turnout from its previous special election, going from 30 percent to 40 percent. Maple Valley went from 31 percent to 37 percent and Vashon Island from 46 percent to 52 percent. (Voter increase in one previous special election does not set a pattern.)

“I’m really excited with what we saw with the post office, but also with voter response,” Wise said.

King County Elections has been trying to make it easier for people to vote since the county adopted mail-ballot voting in 2009. The number of drop boxes, which don’t require postage, increased from 10 to 56. Ballots are provided in Korean, Spanish, Vietnamese and Chinese, and the county is partnering with the Seattle Foundation to educate voters throughout the county and increase turnout.

Turnout fluctuates depending what issues are on the ballot and if it is a presidential election year. In 2016, the last presidential election, 82 percent of registered King County voters cast a ballot. The 2016 primary drew 37 percent. With no presidential election last year, 43 percent voted in King County’s general election and 34 percent in the primary.

King County would be the first county in the state to offer prepaid postage for elections. Kim Wyman, the secretary of state, supports the idea but prefers to see the entire state implement prepaid postage at the same time, so all voters are given the same opportunity, and would want the Legislature to fund it, said Erich Ebel, communications director for the Office of the Secretary of State.

Prepaid postage ballots will be used countywide for the Aug. 7 primary if the County Council approves the budget request before May 3, when ballot printing begins.

DCG