Tag Archives: King County Sheriff

Homeless carrying weapons are “slipping through security” at King County Courthouse

The King County Courthouse is surrounded by homeless people on any given day. Back in April, a King County Councilmember said that it was the worst spot in the city for violent behavior. Citizens are routinely accosted and that it smells so bad because of the public defecation and urination.

In the summer of 2017, a homeless man brandishing a pair of scissors tried to attack King County Sheriff John Urquhart right outside of the courthouse. See the full video of the attempted attack here.

Even judges have stated that it is unsafe around the courthouse. In 2017, two judges described the conditions as “unsanitary” with a “potentially frightening atmosphere.”

Now KIRO7 reports that the weapons that the homeless carry are slipping through the x-ray machine at the courthouse. Apparently the machines are “failing” because they don’t have high-resolution cameras. The machines are also very expensive to maintain. New machines are in the budget for next year.

Some of the items making it through into the courthouse include knives, pepper spray and brass knuckles.

The homeless don’t have any place to store their weapons so apparently they feel it is perfectly acceptable to bring them into a courthouse. It’s not acceptable – it’s against the law and is considered a misdemeanor. I wonder how many homeless people who bring prohibited weapons into the courthouse have actually faced any consequences? That is a rhetorical question, of course.

Read the whole KIRO7 story here.

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King County cops teaming up to fight rise in gun violence

stoopid
In August 2015, the Seattle City Council voted unanimously to establish a tax on gun and ammunition sales in the city, and to require gun owners to report lost and stolen firearms to police. At the time, council president Tim Burgess said this: “Gun violence is a public-health crisis in our city and our nation. City government can and must pursue innovative gun-safety measures that save lives and save money.”
It’s been two years since that gun tax was adopted. And it’s working about as well as you would expect…
From MyNorthwest.com: In his 4 ½ years as King County sheriff, John Urquhart cannot recall a time or an issue that brought together nearly every high-ranking law enforcement official in the Puget Sound region. Until Wednesday, when the region’s recent rise in gun violence put local and federal law enforcement in one room.
Most recently, there were six shootings in two days in the Seattle region. The issue is so severe that Urquhart was blunt while speaking with KIRO Radio’s Ron and Don.
“Young people with guns, that’s exactly what it is … my message to parents is if you think your kids are out there with guns – and I think most parents know – you better put a stop to it, even if you have to call us,” Urquhart said. “Because if you don’t, they are going to get killed. Either we are going to kill them – which is what happened in Seattle two weeks ago – or other people out there, other kids with guns are going to kill them. That’s how serious this is. We don’t want to kill them, we don’t want your kid to get killed. Do something about it.”
The meeting on Wednesday brought together the Washington State Patrol, Seattle Police Department, ATF, DEA, FBI, the DOC, the U.S. Attorney’s Office, and the U.S. Marshal’s Office — each discussing how they have noticed the rise in gun violence.
“There has been an uptick in some gang activity,” Seattle Police Chief Kathleen O’Toole told KIRO 7. “…We had the death of an innocent 16-year-old girl here, just around the corner. We had an elderly couple in the middle of the night that were subject to gunfire. It has to stop. The community is not going to tolerate it, and the police department is not going to tolerate it.”
Urquhart wouldn’t say exactly what tactics are going to be used moving forward, but he did provide some insight. “They are real simple: Boots on the ground,” he said. “We’re are going to go out there and if you have got guns, if you are shooting people, if you are doing drive-bys, we are going to find you and we are going to arrest you, and we are going to work together to find out who is doing this.”
King County gun violence
In just the first four months of 2017, the King County Sheriff’s Office has already logged a considerable number of firearm-related incidents in unincorporated parts of the county. The sheriff did not have the numbers from previous years on hand, but did say that they are “way up.”

  • 14 homicides
  • 40 shootings (people struck by gunfire, but survived)
  • 100 drive-by shootings
  • A total of 120 shots fired were reported to 911 in cities that the sheriff covers (Des Moines, Kent, etc.)

The numbers do not reflect Seattle’s statistics. Seattle shots fired in a 12-month period starting in April:

  • 2013: 73 reports
  • 2014: 76 reports
  • 2015: 113 reports
  • 2016: 103 reports
  • 2017: 119 reports

“The only common denominator is all the guns,” Urquhart said. “Individuals, groups of people, some gangs involved, but not 100 percent. It would be a mistake to say that this is a gang problem, because that is not exactly what this is in every situation.”
“This could be as simple as somebody disrespecting somebody else’s mother or somebody else’s girlfriend … There’s no one situation that applies to all this violence except that everybody has guns and they are shooting people,” he said. “They are shooting innocent people and they are shooting up houses.”
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King Co. Sheriff asks off-duty officers to carry guns, extra mags after Paris attacks

A move that every one who supports the Second Amendment should practice.

Sheriff John Urquhart

Sheriff John Urquhart


Although the majority of King County residents are very liberal, the Sheriff has some common sense. MyNorthwest.com reports that King County Sheriff John Urquhart has instructed off-duty deputies to carry their sidearm with extra magazines, following the deadly Paris attacks.
Prompted by the Paris terrorist attacks, the sheriff sent his deputies a request, via a letter, that off-duty officers be armed with their service weapons and extra magazines of ammo should a terrorist attack hit the Puget Sound region. He said, “It’s not a policy, it’s a request.”
The sheriff added, “We are living in tough times…and certainly what happened in Paris could happen here in Seattle. I want to make sure my deputies are willing, available and have proper equipment to fight that if it happens.”
Urquhart has the guts to say what Obama wont – that the biggest threat to the area is homegrown terrorism, and locals who decide to support terrorists organizations such as ISIS. “What I am worried about, what causes me lose sleep at night, is a homegrown terrorist,” Urquhart said. “That’s somebody that hasn’t come over from Syria, that’s not an official part of ISIS, but has been radicalized by ISIS by their propaganda. They’ve been implored to take action wherever they are, around the world,” he said. “I’m afraid of a homegrown terrorist that does something here. It’s going to be a soft target.”
Urquhart believes that having off-duty deputies armed and prepared will greatly help the situation. “We are all frustrated by what’s going on, mainly because we don’t know what to do. This threat is so nebulous, and yet so real. And I thought this is something we can do,” Urquhart said.
“I always tell my people to be vigilant, ‘if you see something, say something,’ all of that. But it’s not enough,” he said. “Here is something they can do. They can be ready. We have the training. We have the experience. We have the weapons; let’s carry them.” (Amen to that!)
The King County Sheriff’s Office has 700 commissioned officers, according to Urquhart. While off-duty deputies were once required to carry their service weapon wherever they went, that is not the case currently. But for Sheriff Urquhart, it’s already a personal policy that he follows. “I carry all the time,” he said.


I carry because of crime in my town (recently, a woman was walking her dog on a neighborhood street in the afternoon and a man came up behind her and put a knife to her throat) and I typically leave work when it is dark. I trust that my firearms skills will protect me much better than urinating on a potential attacker.
Also, because I can.
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