Tag Archives: King County

Homeless Seattle man, accused of a stabbing, on the loose after failing to show up for court-appointed treatment program

The city of Seattle/King County has a homeless crisis that bureaucrats perpetuate by coddling criminal activities committed by the homeless. Law-abiding citizens are terrorized by these actions: Feces and urine line Seattle streets along with drug needles all over the place. Mentally unstable people are allowed to roam the streets and scare citizens.

The mayor of Seattle, Jenny Durkan, the Seattle City Council and King County bureaucrats are to blame. They take MILLIONS of taxpayer dollars to “solve” the homeless crisis yet do NOTHING to actually solve the problem.

In an effort to help a violent homeless criminal, bureaucrats believed that he would turn his life around if just given the chance. Never mind the fact that he was deemed likely to commit a violent offense.

From MyNorthwest.com: A violent, homeless man with a long criminal record is on the loose, this time, after allegedly stealing a safe from an apartment complex in South Lake Union, nearly $2,500 worth of goods from a local clothing shop, and a woman’s bike and bank card. He’s already being investigated for stabbing a man.

In King County Adult Drug Diversion Court, Prosecutor Dan Satterberg initially asked for $20,000 bail in July for the suspect, Jordan Anthony Acosta. His reasoning was that Acosta “…is likely to commit a violent offense, and is likely to fail-to-appear to future court appearances.”

The King County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office says the parties, including the judge, agreed to release Acosta so that he could participate in outpatient treatment that would be monitored by the court, however. Acosta didn’t appear at a recent court hearing and the judge issued a bench warrant for his arrest, according to the Prosecutor’s Office.

Acosta, 27, has a long criminal history that includes felony theft and assault in the 2nd degree. In all, he has had six warrants for his arrest since 2014. The most recent incidents happened within days of each other.

On July 22, 2018, surveillance allegedly shows Acosta allegedly breaking into a Seattle apartment complex where he pried his way through at least four locked locations, stealing a laptop, key fobs that allow entry into the apartment complex, and a safe holding rent checks (mine included). When officers were dispatched to the location, they immediately recognized Acosta on the surveillance video, according to a police document.

Just three days later, on July 25, Acosta and a second unidentified man, allegedly broke into a Seattle clothing store, stole several backpacks and clothes retailing nearly $2,500. Again, when officers viewed surveillance footage, they immediately identified one of the suspects as Acosta, according to the police document.

Then, on August 2, Acosta fled from cops after they caught him riding without a helmet. The bike — and the bank card, ORCA card, and movie pass he had in his possession — did not belong to him, according to court documents. Indeed, the cards are from a suspected car prowl and the bike stolen from an apartment garage.

Acosta lists a homeless shelter as his residence. There’s been a rash of crime committed by homeless people, sometimes to fuel their drug addiction.

Acosta is also being investigated for stabbing a man in May 2018. In that incident, Acosta allegedly stole a man’s music equipment from an apartment building. When the man attempted to retrieve the stolen goods with a friend, Acosta allegedly stabbed the friend before being arrested. The court document says “The State has concerns about community safety given that this defendant has demonstrated a willingness to stab victims attempting to retain their property.”

Apparently the prosecutor decided it was a good idea to recommend Acosta for the outpatient program because he hadn’t been convicted of a violent crime.

Read the whole story here.

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DCG

PS: Don’t expect this to be an isolated incident: Satterberg is running for re-election unopposed as his challenger dropped out of the race last week due to medical reasons.

Good luck Seattle! You’re going to need it…

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Liberal logic: Despite increase in King County’s homeless population, 10-plan to end homelessness is “not a failure”

Homeless in King County: “Not a failure”/Q13Fox photo

In 2005 King County (Washington) created a 10-year plan to end homelessness. They established the Committee to End Homelessness in King County (CEH), charged with implementing the goals of the Ten-Year Plan: prevent homelessness whenever possible; move people rapidly from homelessness to stable housing; increase the efficiency of existing systems and improve collaboration; and create the public and political will to end homelessness.

Since then, statistics show there has been an increase in homeless citizens:

  • January 2006: 7,910
  • January 2010: 8,937
  • May 2018: 12,112

Despite the increase in homeless in Seattle and King County, a former director for the CEH claims that he doesn’t believe the plan was a failure.

MyNorthwest.com did an interview with Bill Block, the former director of the CEH who said, “I think we’ve accomplished a lot of things for the people we’ve actually need helped,” Block said. “I think we weren’t prepared for the degree to which the mental health system would expand using homelessness as their discharge, or the criminal justice system, or the chemical dependency system.”

And since under his leadership the plan was not a failure, he had to find someone to blame: the federal government.

He said, “In all other developed countries, the national government is responsible for ensuring that there’s an adequate supply of housing for low-income workers,” he said. “And this government stopped doing that in the early ’70s. And that’s a major difference between us and England, or France, or Germany, or the other developed countries.”

Read about the whole interview here.

If this is Block’s idea of success, I’d hate to see an ACTUAL failure.

The only success I see is keeping the industrial homeless complex alive via taxpayer dollars.

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DCG

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Homeless carrying weapons are “slipping through security” at King County Courthouse

The King County Courthouse is surrounded by homeless people on any given day. Back in April, a King County Councilmember said that it was the worst spot in the city for violent behavior. Citizens are routinely accosted and that it smells so bad because of the public defecation and urination.

In the summer of 2017, a homeless man brandishing a pair of scissors tried to attack King County Sheriff John Urquhart right outside of the courthouse. See the full video of the attempted attack here.

Even judges have stated that it is unsafe around the courthouse. In 2017, two judges described the conditions as “unsanitary” with a “potentially frightening atmosphere.”

Now KIRO7 reports that the weapons that the homeless carry are slipping through the x-ray machine at the courthouse. Apparently the machines are “failing” because they don’t have high-resolution cameras. The machines are also very expensive to maintain. New machines are in the budget for next year.

Some of the items making it through into the courthouse include knives, pepper spray and brass knuckles.

The homeless don’t have any place to store their weapons so apparently they feel it is perfectly acceptable to bring them into a courthouse. It’s not acceptable – it’s against the law and is considered a misdemeanor. I wonder how many homeless people who bring prohibited weapons into the courthouse have actually faced any consequences? That is a rhetorical question, of course.

Read the whole KIRO7 story here.

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DCG

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Liberal utopia of Seattle: 8 new cases of HIV identified in homeless population

Many progressive-run cities on the west coast have a serious homeless crisis. The homeless are free to do drugs in the open (and in shelters), drink on the streets and generally continue their dangerous activities with no consequences. Heck, their bad behaviors are even encouraged by the bureaucrats. See the following posts:

Now the homeless are about to be responsible for a potential health outbreak in the Emerald City, thanks to Seattle Police allowing them to shoot up where ever they want and the bureaucrats keeping the homeless industrial complex alive.

From MyNorthwest.com: A cluster of new HIV infections in North Seattle has health officials worried that it’s unknowingly being spread by homeless addicts.

Eight new cases have been identified among people described as being homeless, heterosexual, and drug users. Public Health said several of the people reported exchanging sex for money or drugs.

Doctors say the cluster is unusual and suggests that HIV could be gaining inroads into the heterosexual population through dirty needles.

This cluster is unusual and worrying, suggesting that we are seeing an increase in HIV among heterosexuals who inject drugs, and that HIV could be gaining inroads into the heterosexual population through injection drug use,” Dr. Matthew Golden, MD, Director of Public Health’s HIV/STD Program said in a news release. “Changes in drug use patterns, with greater mixing between heroin users and people who inject methamphetamine, may be putting more people at risk for HIV.”

An average of 10 heterosexual people who use injection drugs are diagnosed with the disease in King County each year, according to Public Health. So far, there have already been 19 in 2018.

Public Health says it is alerting healthcare providers and urging them to increase HIV testing and prevention counseling, increasing outreach and testing programs, providing case management for individuals newly-identified with infections, and continuing to assure access to sterile injection equipment and condoms.

“The most effective way to prevent HIV transmission in the community is to identify people with HIV, link them to medical care and ensure that they are treated,” Dr. Jeff Duchin, Health Officer for Public Health – Seattle & King County said in a news release. “Medications for HIV suppress the infection, safeguarding the health of infected persons and preventing HIV transmission.”

Public Health says homelessness is a contributing factor for communicable diseases and HIV. The homeless have poor access to health care, have a high prevalence of injection drug use, and face behavioral health challenges.

DCG

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Children & teenagers can receive free birth control from Seattle Schools – without parental notification

Note: I’m re-publishing various past posts we were able to recover from Word Press after they shut us down. This step is necessary to have them appear on our new blog.

King5: At least 1,000 high school girls went to the nurse to talk about getting birth control at school, and their parents may never find out, even if they decide to begin treatment. That’s the law, actually. In Washington, minors can access birth control without parental permission — even at school.

Seattle-King County Public Health updated the city council on Wednesday about its school health program providing medical care at 26 middle and high schools in Seattle. The health centers are run by private organizations, like Swedish and Group Health, and are nothing like the nurse’s office you may remember.

The county knows 1,293 high schoolers discussed birth control options, like the pill, IUDs and arm implants, with the school health center. There are no records for the number of high schoolers who decided to get birth control at school. The county says 49 middle schoolers discussed the same options, some as young as 13 years old.

Of the 49 middle school girls, four obtained a long-acting reversible contraceptive (LARC). The health department said no middle school girl obtained an IUD; instead, the 4 girls received an arm-implantable contraceptive device.

Sara Rigel with Seattle Public Health says for the 15-17 year old group there was a 92% reduction in teen birth rates from 1990 to 2013. That’s far better than numbers outside King County where there was only a 62% drop. (No links provided for these statistics.)

In line with state law, student health centers at Seattle Public Schools provide all forms of contraception to all students, including long-acting reversible contraceptives or IUDs. The goal is to lower the number of girls dropping out of school because they become pregnant. And they do so with or without parental notification.

When asked if a child as young as 12 years old could get an IUD through a middle school clinic, Rigel said if a 6th grader asked for birth control, they would be provided it as long as they did not appear to be the victim of abuse. She said the clinic would ask a lot of questions before providing contraception.

I’m all for reducing unwanted pregnancies. But is it acceptable for schools to provide medications without parental knowledge? Just wish some parents would take more interest in their child’s activities and well being.

DCG

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Seattle Clown Councilmember believes "inclusive" Ping-Pong tables will help deter crime

king county courthouse homeless seattle times photo

The homeless situation just by the courthouse/Seattle Times photo


You cannot make this stuff up.
About this council member, Sally Bagshaw:

  • Served on the council since 2009
  • Prior to that, she served eight years as Chief Civil Deputy Prosecutor of the King County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office
  • Began her legal career as an Assistant Attorney General after graduating from Stanford University and the University of Idaho Law School
  • Has also served as business and finance lawyer for both Washington State University and University of Washington

From MyNorthwest.com (by Jason Rantz): The area surrounding the King County Courthouse in downtown Seattle is dangerous. Crime is rampant. Homelessness is out of control.
It’s not safe to visit as a juror. It’s not safe to work in the buildings nearby. You can’t even walk around the neighborhood without olfactory offenses, human waste everywhere.
The solution? Ping-Pong!
Seattle City Councilmember Sally Bagshaw says that she’d like to bring a host of amenities to the area as an “inclusive” way to make the area safer. She’d like to see Ping-Pong tables, seating, and food trucks come to the area.
“This could be a place where we bring tables and chairs like we did at Westlake and Occidental,” Bagshaw told KING 5. “When there are places to be, and there’s food, and they can sit, then [the park] gets activated and there’s space for everybody.”
There doesn’t yet seem to be much support for the idea, certainly not from people most familiar with the area. “Playing Ping-Pong isn’t any more of a diversion than placing Volleyball nets up,” one Seattle police officer told me.
Indeed, this area has seen a remarkable amount of a crime. Former King County Sheriff John Urquhart was confronted by a homeless man with a knife. Things got so bad several months ago — with jurors and a half dozen courthouse employees being assaulted — that two judges spoke out.
Crime aside, the area smells of human feces and urine. Take a stroll through the blocks surrounding the courthouse and you’re likely to see someone using the nearby park or a random sidewalk as a toilet. Could you imagine eating a grilled cheese from a nearby food truck in a neighborhood like this?
Bagshaw says other nearby areas have benefited from the amenities she’s talking about. She points to Occidental Park, which has seen a decrease in the types of behavior we experience near the courthouse. She’s right, we have, but the context is so remarkably different. It makes a comparison a bit disingenuous because, she claims, her move wouldn’t displace the homeless folks who are near the courthouse for services.
Occidental Park is surrounded by businesses catering to tens of thousands of people visiting the area for Sounders, Seahawks, and Mariners games. During game days, they absolutely displace the homelessness population. And they don’t have to be there for access to services. The courthouse? They need to be in that spot for access to the services provided. And does Bagshaw realize many of the people who are living on the street and committing these acts of violence are living with an untreated mental illness or addiction? Access to a Ping-Pong table won’t stop them from acting out; treatment would.
Perhaps — and stay with me here as I’m about to unveil a radical and controversial idea — we continue to increase police presence and — wait for it — enforce the law.
People feel inherently unsafe when you let crime and homelessness envelop a neighborhood. Perhaps the council should give officers the green light to actually do their job and we can, for once, stop the shouts for affordable housing and, instead, call for treatment on demand? No, it’s not as fun as Ping-Pong, but it might actually save lives.
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DCG

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Seattle-King County Public Health want doctors to be more inquisitive into patient firearm access/ownership

guns
On Tuesday, Seattle-King County Public Health published a statement with their intent to decrease gun violence. The blog was posted by Dr. Jeff Duchin, Health Officer for Public Health – Seattle & King County.
About Dr. Duchin: “Jeff served for over 15 years as Chief of the Public Health’s Communicable Disease Epidemiology & Immunization Section. Jeff trained as a Medical Epidemiologist in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) after which he completed the CDC’s Preventive Medicine Residency program.”
See his full bio here.
The doctor is on Twitter. Here’s a few of his tweets:

The blog post by Seattle-King County Public Health talks about suicide and firearm-related injuries including statistics, deaths  and costs to taxpayers. Read the full blog post here.
Here are excerpts from the agency’s new pledge:
“For that reason, Public Health is joining with leading medical professional associations to form a new collaboration with a renewed commitment to decrease firearm-related injury and deaths by working together and using a public health approach.
Prevention is the core of a public health approach, and firearm injuries and deaths can be prevented. We must address prevention of firearm-related injuries in the same way we do for other types of injuries, poisonings, and infectious and chronic diseases, using a public health approach that includes:

  • Screening to identify patients with risk factors for firearm-related injury
  • Educating patients and families about risk factors, firearm safety and injury prevention as we do for other diseases and causes of injury – gun owners and non-gun owners alike understand the importance of firearm safety
  • Gathering data and conducting research on risk and protective factors for firearm related injury and death in order to make evidence-based recommendations and strategies
  • Promoting the adoption of successful prevention strategies, including those addressing upstream drivers of violence, such as childhood abuse, neglect and trauma, poverty, substance use disorders, disrupted families and communities, and being a victim of violence
  • Fostering multidisciplinary and community collaborations with stakeholders interested in reducing firearm-related injury and death, including gun-owners

The medical community has an important role in this work.  You can read our joint statement, which includes a description of our approach and examples of actions healthcare providers can take to reduce firearm-related injury and death, at http://www.kingcounty.gov/firearm-injuries-ph. 
(WARNING: I tried clicking on the link to read the document and each time I did my computer froze. Not sure if it’s just my computer or the Public Health link.)
This collaboration among healthcare provider professional organizations is the first of many steps local and statewide medical professionals can take together to reduce firearm injury and death in our communities. We invite other healthcare professional organizations to join us by endorsing our statement and/or participating in our future work.”
MyNorthwest.com has some more details:
“Those efforts include joining with experts at Harborview Injury Prevention and Research Center, Washington State Medical Association, King County Medical Society, and other state and local medical groups to recommend more screening and education for patients of all ages, including everything from identifying risk factors to talking to them about the importance of safely storing guns.
It recommends medical professionals should also respect beliefs of lawful firearm owners in order to effectively communicate. Also, to use healthcare providers who are also gun owners to provide leadership and knowledge on the issue.


I wonder if any of the “data” gathered by doctors could be used in the future to determine if compliance is being achieved with Mayor Durkan’s proposed new gun legislation?
DCG

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Rape, strangulation and assault: Three attacks by homeless people in Seattle in less than a month

The homeless situation in Seattle/Q13Fox photo

In November 2015 the former mayor of Seattle, homosexual Ed Murray, declared a state of emergency in Seattle due to the homelessness situation. At that time, there was an estimated 10,000 people living on the streets. Fast-forward to May 2018 and the number of homeless people has increased to over 12,100.

The city has a very lax policy in allowing the homeless to commit drug offenses. The homeless openly use and drug dealers are frequently spotted at homeless hangouts. The city even allows drug use at some homeless shelters.

Now the homeless have become more brazen with their criminal activities. No amount of tax payer dollars is going to solve the problem until Seattle officials stop coddling these individuals.

From MyNorthwest.com: Police report there’s been another assault from a man, believed to be homeless, against innocent passers-by, this time a father and his daughter walking to the Cinerama in Belltown on Father’s Day.

The unidentified victims were on their way to a screening of “The Incredibles 2” when the suspect, David Ailep, allegedly followed the pair as they walked down the sidewalk. When the female victim tried to walk away from Ailep, he said to her “why are you laughing at me” and “stop laughing at me.” She wasn’t laughing at him.

According to the police report, obtained by KTTH 770 AM, she asked Ailep to get away from her, but he refused:

“She observed that Ailep had his right hand in his pocket (she noted that it looked like was holding a knife in his hand covered by his jacket pocket) and his left hand was up and back in a striking position like he was going to hit her,” the report says. “She feared that he was going to strike her, and she decided to pull out her ASP baton from her purse to defend herself.”

The female victim screamed at him to get away from her, but he refused, grabbing both of her arms, and rattling her back and forth until he was able to take the baton from her, according to the police documents. She yelled out in pain.

At this point, her father became aware of the assault and jumped into help, tackling Ailep to the ground. While on the ground, according to the police report, Ailep swung the baton at the father, hitting him “directly on the forehead” leaving a “visible swollen laceration” from the baton strike.

After police arrived in the area of the 9-1-1 call, they spotted a suspect matching Ailep’s description. When the two officers attempted to make contact with Ailep, he sprinted away on foot and, “without any instruction given to him,” laid on the ground to be detained.

One of the officers observed Ailep to be under the influence of drugs. He said Ailep had a difficult time staying focused, and appeared frantic and “in a complete stand of delusion or delirium.”

During the interview, he made random statements to the officer like “what’s in your sink man” and “I take showers.” He repeated random statements like “easy” and “twelve, thirteen, twenty-two.” The police report claims he “appeared to be suffering from the effects of a powerful psychedelic and or stimulant narcotic…” and claimed he performed oral sex for drugs. While he claimed his pockets were empty, a search found a folding knife, a cell phone, and a wallet that didn’t belong to him.

After his arrest for felony assault and theft, a King County Intake nurse advised Ailep was not suffering from mental illness but was “extremely intoxicated” from a stimulant narcotic. While the Seattle Police Department hasn’t confirmed Ailep is homeless, a source suggested they believe him to be.

This is the third high-profile homeless attack on a passerby in the last several weeks, with a rape in Ballard and a strangling of a tourist near the Space Needle occurring within weeks of each other. These incidents are occurring as Mayor Jenny Durkan asks for community support to place tiny home villages in residential neighborhoods. The South Lake Union village may be low barrier, which would allow someone like Ailep the ability to keep his drugs in his home.

DCG

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Seattle to help the homeless safely inject drugs with medical mobile unit

mobile medical unit

King County’s medical mobile unit


Seattle’s homeless crisis is exacerbated by the fact that the local area politicians and government officials believe that enabling an addiction is part of the solution.
Taxpayers are coughing up MILLIONS of dollars to provide assistance to those in need. Yet many of the homeless don’t want help any help.
The inhabitant of the “tent mansion” near Seattle Center has refused help from the city, choosing instead to live on the street, than follow the rules of a shelter. She said, “We don’t want to change our lifestyle to fit their requirements. We intend to stay here. This is the solution to the homeless problem. We want autonomy, right here.”
The Pierce County Sheriff’s Office recently offered to help the homeless at an encampment. They brought in agencies to offer services and help with drug addiction. Out of the 50 campers there only one accepted the assistance.
King County already offers medical mobile units.
Yet Seattle, which recently approved a business “head tax” to solve their homeless crisis, is going ahead with their medical mobile unit. Guess they have to spend their recently-acquired taxpayer dollars somewhere.
From MyNorthwest.com: Seattle council members are looking to get around the dilemma of where to place a safe injection site by making it mobile. The city is now exploring what Human Services Department spokesperson Meg Olberding describes as a “large mobile medical van.”
The van would be akin to the medical RVs the county and city currently use to serve homeless residents. KIRO 7 reports that they will be much larger, however.  The option is referred to as “fixed-mobile.” A medical van would park at a fixed location, but return to a secure location every night.
“It is an option where we would actually lease or go into an agreement regarding a fixed site, and then with that, we would have a mobile van,” said Dr. Jeffrey Duchin, Health Officer for Public Health Seattle-King County. “… this is potentially a very large vehicle that we would then house the consumption activity in.”
The mobile van would offer consumption booths and recovery space. According to Q13, the safe injection van would cost about $350,000; along with $1.8 million to get the van set up, and $2.5 million to operate it. Seattle has already set aside some money for a safe injection program and the van could be paid for from those funds.
“Obviously, there will continue to be concerns about the neighborhood, security of the neighborhood, about other activities happening in the neighborhood, so we would want to make sure we provide a safe area, not only for the neighbors but for the individuals who are using as well,” Duchin told the council.
The mobile option faces a similar issue that a fixed site does — where to park it. One thing is clear, the council doesn’t want to wait much longer. Councilmember Teresa Mosqueda said that she favors purchasing a van. The city would then conduct community outreach for potential locations.
“Every day we don’t move forward, people are at risk for overdose and death, so with that in mind and with this sense of urgency for the third time this year alone that you have heard us express this, I am calling on our mayor and our county as a whole to act with urgency so we can move forward this year,” Mosqueda said. “We have the resources in hand; we have the support from the broad public, and we have data-driven solutions.”
(I have researched the validity of safe injection sites and there is a very mixed reaction as to whether or not they work. One can easily choose the data that supporst their opinion.)
“This is a data-driven, public health harm reduction model that is proven to be effective at saving lives and getting people into treatment,” she said.
The city will spend the next two months considering potential locations to park the van (so much for that “sense of urgency”). Officials favor a private lot, and note that most drug activity happens around SoDo, downtown, and the west side of Capital Hill, according to KIRO 7. The city did consider buying property specifically for the van, but found that it was “cost restrictive” inside Seattle.
Read the whole story here.


Enslaving drug users only perpetuates the cycle. And it keeps the taxpayer money flowing to develop more “solutions.”
DCG

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King County Elections wants pre-paid postage for mail-in ballots

Judge Judy shakes head rolls eyes
Just a thought: If you can’t figure out how to get a stamp and that’s the only thing that makes it “easier” for you to vote, you probably shouldn’t be voting.
From Seattle Times: King County voters might no longer have to worry about finding stamps for their ballots.
Prepaid postage for the county’s mail-in ballots could happen as soon as the Aug. 7 primary if the King County Metropolitan Council approves a supplemental budget request to fund the change. Adopting the request would cost about $191,000 this year and approximately $250,000 annually, said Julie Wise, King County elections director. The county will not be charged for ballots not mailed. Postage would run 50 cents per piece for the county.
Wise, who has worked for the elections division since 2000, has long wanted to send voters prepaid ballots. One of the first things she and County Executive Dow Constantine discussed after her election as director in 2015 was getting prepaid postage on ballots.
“The first thing he said was, ‘Let’s do prepaid ballots, but first let’s make sure this works, and we don’t negatively impact voters,’” she recalled him saying.
Wise moved cautiously to ensure a prepaid postage system could work. The first test happened last year with three special elections in Maple Valley, Shoreline and Vashon Island. She wanted to see how it worked with the post office, and if it increased voter turnout. Shoreline saw a 10 percent increase in voter turnout from its previous special election, going from 30 percent to 40 percent. Maple Valley went from 31 percent to 37 percent and Vashon Island from 46 percent to 52 percent. (Voter increase in one previous special election does not set a pattern.)
“I’m really excited with what we saw with the post office, but also with voter response,” Wise said.
King County Elections has been trying to make it easier for people to vote since the county adopted mail-ballot voting in 2009. The number of drop boxes, which don’t require postage, increased from 10 to 56. Ballots are provided in Korean, Spanish, Vietnamese and Chinese, and the county is partnering with the Seattle Foundation to educate voters throughout the county and increase turnout.
Turnout fluctuates depending what issues are on the ballot and if it is a presidential election year. In 2016, the last presidential election, 82 percent of registered King County voters cast a ballot. The 2016 primary drew 37 percent. With no presidential election last year, 43 percent voted in King County’s general election and 34 percent in the primary.
King County would be the first county in the state to offer prepaid postage for elections. Kim Wyman, the secretary of state, supports the idea but prefers to see the entire state implement prepaid postage at the same time, so all voters are given the same opportunity, and would want the Legislature to fund it, said Erich Ebel, communications director for the Office of the Secretary of State.
Prepaid postage ballots will be used countywide for the Aug. 7 primary if the County Council approves the budget request before May 3, when ballot printing begins.
DCG

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