Tag Archives: Jerry Brown

Signatures submitted for Jerry Brown’s criminal justice initiative

My Solution?
don't do the crime
From Sacramento Bee: Gov. Jerry Brown’s criminal justice initiative may be heading for the fall ballot after proponents on Friday began submitting hundreds of thousands of signatures.
Dana Williamson, a former Brown confidant who is spearheading the campaign, posted a photo online of several cardboard boxes filled with signed petitions. “Heading to counties with nearly a million (signatures) for @JerryBrownGov criminal justice measure,” Williamson wrote on the social media service Twitter. Brown must have about 585,500 valid signatures to qualify for the November 8 ballot.
His measure would override a tough sentencing law he signed during his first stint as governor, in 1976. It would allow certain non-violent felons to seek early parole, give juvenile court judges the power to try a juvenile as an adult after a hearing and permit the state Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation to allot credits to prisoners for good behavior.
A court challenge to keep it off the ballot is pending before the California Supreme Court.

Jerry Brown: "You have power over your life"

Jerry Brown: Giving felons “power over their lives”


Touting his proposal earlier this year, Brown said there was no incentive now for people in prison to rehabilitate their lives. “You get out at a certain day. Not earlier, not later,” he said of the system. “But if you can get parole, or you can earn credits … for going home earlier, then you have a power over your life. You can take charge. And learning how to take control of your life is exactly what we need people to do.
In addition to opposing the policy, the state prosecutor’s group challenged the mechanics of the initiative. The California District Attorneys Association contends that Brown and his allies short-circuited the process by combining their plan with a different juvenile justice proposal that had been submitted earlier. The case is pending at the state Supreme Court.
Mark Zahner, chief executive for the district attorneys, promised a vigorous opposition campaign beginning next week.
Zahner said in a statement: “With crime rates rising dramatically across the state of California for the first time in decades we believe the voters will be extremely reluctant to pass a measure that allows violent felons who have committed crimes along the likes of domestic violence, human trafficking, rape of an unconscious person and assault with a deadly weapon to be let back out on the streets before serving the time sentenced by a judge.”
Friday is the deadline for initiative proponents to submit their signatures under a bill recently signed by Brown. Supporters of another initiative to direct funding from reusable bag sales to an environmental fund said Thursday that they planned to turn in about 600,000 signatures.
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How's that new minimum wage gonna work for CA? The "exodus" has begun for the apparel industry

Just less than a month ago, I reported on how a deal was struck to raise the California minimum wage to $15 by 2022. Statewide polls showed strong support for increasing the state’s mandatory minimum wage with California voters saying the gap between the rich and poor is widening and those voters thinking government should do more to bridge the gap.
So after just several weeks of this raise announcement, what’s predicted to happen? Take a wild guess…
be careful what you wish for
Via LA Times: Los Angeles was once the epicenter of apparel manufacturing, attracting buyers from across the world to its clothing factories, sample rooms and design studios.
But over the years, cheap overseas labor lured many apparel makers to outsource to foreign competitors in far-flung places such as China and Vietnam.
Now, Los Angeles firms are facing another big hurdle — California’s minimum wage hitting $15 an hour by 2022 — which could spur more garment makers to exit the state.
Last week American Apparel, the biggest clothing maker in Los Angeles, said it might outsource the making of some garments to another manufacturer in the U.S., and wiped out about 500 local jobs. The company still employs about 4,000 workers in Southern California.
“The exodus has begun,” said Sung Won Sohn, an economist at Cal State Channel Islands and a former director at Forever 21. “The garment industry is gradually shrinking and that trend will likely continue.”
In the last decade, local apparel manufacturing has already thinned significantly. Last year, Los Angeles County was home to 2,128 garment makers, down 33% from 2005, according to Bureau of Labor Statistics data. During that period, employment also plunged by a third, to 40,500 workers. Wages, meanwhile, jumped 17% adjusting for inflation, to $698 per week — although that can include pay for top executives, as well as bonuses, tips and paid vacation time.
Many apparel companies say Los Angeles is a difficult place to do business. Commercial real estate is expensive and limited, the cost of raw materials continues to rise and it can be difficult to find skilled workers who can afford to live in the city. They expect things will become even more challenging after the minimum-wage hike further raises their expenses.
The minimum wage is accelerating changes in the L.A. apparel industry that began decades ago, industry experts said.
In the 1990s, as borders opened up, foreign competitors began snatching up business from Southland garment factories. Eventually, many big brands opted to leave the region in favor of cheaper locales. Guess Jeans, which epitomized a sexy California look, moved production to Mexico and South America. Just a few years ago, premium denim maker Hudson Jeans began shifting manufacturing to Mexico.
Read the whole story here.
government solve all problems
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Deal struck to raise California minimum wage to $15

minimum wage
From The Sacramento Bee: Gov. Jerry Brown, labor unions and state lawmakers have reached a deal to gradually raise California’s minimum wage to $15 an hour, likely averting a fight on the November ballot, sources said late Saturday.
Democratic lawmakers were expected to discuss the agreement privately in a caucus on Monday. Brown presented the agreement to lawmakers last week, a source said.
The agreement, discussed by labor groups in a teleconference on Saturday, comes after intense advocacy by labor unions and statewide polls showing strong support for increasing the state’s mandatory minimum wage beyond its current $10 an hour.
The deal would raise the statewide minimum incrementally, reaching $15 an hour by 2022, and linking increases to inflation after that. Small businesses would be given an additional year to comply.
It also appears to include a concession to labor unions, who advocated for paid sick time for home health care workers, a source said.
The Governor’s Office did not immediately respond to a request for comment. Sen. Mark Leno, D-San Francisco, confirmed to The Associated Press on Saturday that an agreement had been reached.
Discussions surrounding the minimum wage increase come amid increasing concern about income inequality in the country. According to a Public Policy Institute of California poll last week, 81 percent of likely California voters say the gap between the rich and poor is widening, and 58 percent of likely voters think government should do more to bridge the gap.
government solve all problems
Brown, a fourth-term Democrat, had been reticent about a minimum wage increase, concerned about the impact of rising wages in the event of an economic downturn. In January, he told reporters any wage increase “has to be done very carefully and it has to be done over time.”
The agreement he brokered includes the ability for a governor to temporarily stop future increases in the minimum wage during a recession, sources said. The agreement, if passed, would replace a ballot initiative to raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2021.
The initiative qualified for the ballot last week, even as its sponsor, Service Employees International Union United Healthcare Workers West, continued to negotiate on a compromise.

SEIU's best buddy...

SEIU’s best buddy…


The Service Employees International Union’s state council, California’s largest labor union, has been gathering signatures for its own minimum wage increase, and labor advocates feared competing proposals could hurt the chances of either initiative passing.
Steve Trossman, a spokesman for Service Employees International Union United Healthcare Workers West, said that “if something passes and is signed by the governor, we will look at it and our executive board will decide what to do with our initiative.”
The agreement, if passed, will likely avoid an expensive campaign on the fall ballot, with supporters having raised more than $4.7 million for the effort so far.
DCG

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Worst gas leak in U.S. history is uncontrolled in So. California; a public health crisis

If you go by the Establishment Media, you wouldn’t know there’s a MONUMENTAL environmental and public health disaster in southern California, which is worse than the 2010 BP Gulf Oil spill.
For more than 3 months, since October 23, 2015, methane gas has been leaking, uncontrolled, from a natural gas well connected to the huge Aliso Canyon underground storage facility near Porter Ranch, Los Angeles — the second largest natural gas storage facility in the United States which supplies processed natural gas to upwards of 20,000,000 people throughout the greater Los Angeles area. 
The facility belongs to the Southern California Gas Company, a subsidiary of Sempra Energy.
The leak is so bad that on January 6, 2016, California Governor Jerry Brown issued a state of emergency. 
Erin Brockovich calls the Aliso Canyon gas leak “the equivalent of the BP oil spill on land, in a populated community“. Unlike the BP oil leak from an undersea well 5,000 feet below the surface and 60 miles out at sea, the Aliso Canyon gas leak is in a high-density residential area of Los Angeles County, with the city of Los Angeles a stone’s throw away.
Aliso Canyon gas leak map
The general area affected by the Aliso Canyon gas leak has a population of 30,000 people. Already, some  2,500 households have been relocated from Porter Ranch; another 6,500 plus families are in the process of being relocated. When is the last time that 10,000 households were relocated for any type of manmade disaster?  That’s how bad this gas leak is.
Methane is the most powerful greenhouse gas (GHG). The Aliso Canyon leak is coming from a broken pipe in an old gas well, SS 25, which is over 8500 feet deep. When well SS 25 was drilled in 1953, it was provided with a safety valve. In 1979, the safety valve was removed because it was old and leaking, but a new replacement valve was never installed because the well was not considered “critical” in that it wasn’t “within 100 feet of a road or a park, or within 300 feet of a home”.
What makes this ongoing and uncontrolled leak so dangerous is the fact that the broken pipe is directly connected to the second largest gas storage facility in the United States, a facility that can hold 86 billion cubic feet of natural gas. 

Public Health crisis 

The medical ailments and various health conditions associated with over-exposure to natural gas have already affected many residents in Porter Ranch.
The Alison Canyon gas leak is comprised of methane gas, mercaptan, benzene, toluene and other alkanes in lesser amounts. The health risks of mercaptan and methane are the most serious.
1. Mercaptan
Also called methanethiol, mercaptan is an organosulfur addictive added to natural gas so that leaks can be quickly identified because of sulfur’s foul-smelling rotten-egg odor. Mercaptan is the cause of most of the Alison Canyon gas leak medical ailments thus far which have required some form of medical intervention, including the closure of three schools. Mercaptan, at very high concentrations, is highly toxic and affects the central nervous system. Symptoms include fever, cough, dyspnea, tightness and burning in the chest, dizziness, headache, loss of sense of smell, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. Even lower but sustained levels of mercaptan can cause depression, respiratory irritation, respiratory paralysis, pulmonary edema, tremors and seizures, liver and kidney damage, tachycardia and hypertension.
2. Methane
Methane gas in high concentrations and/or prolonged exposure can pose serious health risks because methane depletes oxygen from our bodies, triggering breathing difficulties and eventually resulting in suffocation. Symptoms of methane poisoning include nausea, vomiting, headaches, heart palpitations, cognitive problems (from lack of oxygen in one’s brain), and collapse.
3. Radiation
According to a February 3, 2016 report by radio station 95.1-FM in New York city, efforts by Southern California Gas to seal the leak thus far has failed. Even worse, those efforts have destabilized the well, causing other leaks in other areas of the gas field. Late last week, officials described the leak as “totally out of control”.
The volume of gas is coming out so forcefully, it has been described as “like a volcano,” the plume of gas stretching literally for miles above heavily populated areas of Los Angeles. Below is an infra-red image of the otherwise invisible gas plume.
Aliso Canyon gas leak
Even more alarming, according to experts from the International Association for Protection from Ionizing Rays (AIPRI) in France, the Aliso Canyon gas leak is also spewing lethal levels — about 45.95 curies a day — of naturally-occurring uranium, radon and other radioactive materials into the air around Los Angeles.
The curie (symbol Ci) is a non-metric unit of radioactivity that’s widely used in the United States to describe very large radioactive releases. To illustrate, the French becquerel (Bq) is a much more human-sized unit of measure for radiation, which means one radioactive count per second. The curie is such a large radioactive release that one curie equals 37 billion becquerels.
The Aliso Canyon gas leak is spewing 45.95 curies or 1.7 trillion becquerels of radioactivity a day — a Fukushima-class disaster.
Reportedly, many residents of Chatsworth, Northridge and Granada Hills have been complaining of nosebleeds, vomiting and diarrhea which they attribute to methane or the mercaptan addictive. But the symptoms of nosebleeds, vomiting and diarrhea are ALSO signs of radiation sickness.
From SuperStation91:

Don’t believe us?  Buy your own little Geiger Counter and take some readings yourself.  Folks in the area where this gas is blowing will see radiation counts exceeding 2,000 counts-per-minute.  In some cases, exceeding that by many times.  Then ask the California Highway Patrol what their criteria is for a “Radiation Emergency”?  They’ll tell you “Any reading of 500 Counts-Per-Minute CPM or higher is considered a radiation emergency.”  It’s been their protocol for years.  Same thing with the LA Fire Department.  Ask them.  They’ll tell you.

Explosion

Natural gas can explode if exposed to an ignition source like a pilot light on a stove or in a hot water heater.
We’ve all seen news of gas explosions in homes or buildings, and their devastating aftermath. Imagine what Chatsworth, Northridge and Granada Hills will look like if the miles-high Aliso Canyon gas plume floating above those homes ignites. Entire communities would be flattened.  The deaths and injuries from such an event would be mind-boggling, yet people are not being told how dangerous this leak is and, despite calls by doctors a month ago to evacuate, many are remaining in the area.

That’s because local-state governments and the media are not communicating the gravity of the gas leak.

There is much speculation throughout the LA area that the catastrophe was deliberately hushed up because of the sheer enormity and severity of the problem.
That it took almost two and a half months for Governor Jerry Brown to officially declare the leak to be an emergency may have something to do with Brown’s sister being on the board of Sempra Energy, the parent company of SoCalGas.
SoCalGas has known about this well gone bad for many years and deliberately chose to take the path of least resistance at every juncture. Given its prior knowledge of faulty and inadequate equipment at the site, SoCalGas faces legal and financial liability that far exceeds anything ever experienced by an American utility.
Why the authorities have not fully disclosed to the people in Los Angeles the enormity of the Aliso Canyon catastrophe may be because they don’t want a panic on their hands, or have businesses and industries shut down, resulting in the loss of jobs and billions in tax revenues.
In the meantime, the gas leak continues . . . .
Sources: GreenMediaInfo; SuperStation95; SHTFplan.com
H/t FOTM‘s MomOfIV, josephbc69, and TNrick
~Eowyn

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California economic portrait not pretty

Apparently Californians don’t know the definition of insanity.
lauren bacall
Sacramento Bee: Federal officials released three major economic reports this month and together, they paint a dark picture of California.
Superficially, the monthly employment report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) was good news. California added 36,300 jobs in August, 470,000 in one year and more than 2 million since the recovery began. The unemployment rate, which had topped 12 percent during the recession, dropped to 6.1 percent in August.
Meanwhile, the Census Bureau reported that California’s official poverty rate for 2014 was 16.3 percent, somewhat higher than the national rate of 14.7 percent.
Finally, a Bureau of Economic Analysis report on regional economies revealed that outside the red-hot San Francisco Bay Area, California’s economy trailed national expansion last year, and several rural areas actually saw declines.
Taken together, the voluminous data dumps reveal that those on the upper rungs of the economic ladder, and the communities in which they cluster, particularly in the Bay Area, are doing well. However, very large portions of the state, both geographically and sociologically, are struggling.
Take that 6.1 percent jobless rate. As low as that may seem, it’s still the ninth-highest among the states, a full percentage point higher than the national average and 50 percent higher than Texas’ 4.1 percent. Among the nation’s 387 Bureau of Labor Statistics “metropolitan statistical areas,” nine of the 10 with the highest unemployment rates are in California, topped by 24.2 percent in Imperial County.
Among the nation’s 51 largest Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs), the Riverside-San Bernardino region is dead last at 7.1 percent, yet environmental groups want to block a proposed new warehouse complex (and its jobs) in Riverside County.
California fares even worse by a truer measure of underemployment, called U-6, which counts not only workers who are officially unemployed, but those “marginally attached” to the labor force and those involuntarily working part-time. Our U-6 rate is 14 percent, down a bit from the recession but still the nation’s second-highest, topped only by Nevada’s 15.2 percent.
Finally, the true employment picture is affected by the “labor force participation rate,” the percentage of those in the prime working age group (16-64) working or seeking work. Ours is 62.3 percent, the lowest level in 40 years. When more than a third of potential workers sit on the sidelines, the official unemployment rate, or even U-6, look much better than they truly are. The true underemployment rate may be closer to 20 percent.
Back to the poverty rate. It’s not only higher than the national rate, but as the California Budget and Policy Center points out, the data indicate that 22.7 percent of the state’s children are living in poverty, and they are nearly a third of all officially impoverished Californians. As dark as that situation may sound, it’s actually worse. By the Census Bureau’s supplemental poverty measure, which uses broader factors including the cost of living – especially housing – 23.4 percent of Californians are impoverished.
Those data are bolstered by two other factoids. Nearly a third of California’s 39 million residents are enrolled in Medi-Cal, the federal-state health care program for the poor, and nearly 60 percent of K-12 students qualify for reduced-price or free lunches due to low family incomes.
This is not a pretty picture.
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Deal requires California state workers to pay ahead for retiree health care

This is a start yet will barely put a dent in the $71.8 BILLION unfunded liability.
kick the can down the road
Sacramento Bee: Gov. Jerry Brown’s administration has reached a tentative deal with a key employee union that would require state engineers to contribute toward their retirement health care benefits, likely establishing a template that will be applied to other state employee unions to help reduce a growing financial liability.
Under the three-year agreement, which still must be ratified by the union’s members and the Democratic-dominated Legislature, the Professional Engineers in California Government in mid-2017 would have to begin paying one-half of 1 percent of their pre-tax salaries into a fund to chip away at the fiscal millstone.
The contribution, including the dollar-for-dollar match by the state, would rise to 2 percent of the workers’ salary by July 2019, though a union spokesman noted that the group is scheduled to return to the bargaining table in early 2018.
For employees hired after Jan. 1, the deal lengthens from 20 years to 25 years the amount of time it would take to become fully vested in the retiree health care program. And the amount the plan would pay for those employees would be reduced from 100 percent for primary beneficiaries and 90 percent for dependents to 80 percent for both.
The Brown administration did not comment on the deal. But it represents a victory for the Democratic governor, who wanted current state employees to begin paying for retiree health care and future employees to have more modest benefits.
The California Association of Highway Patrolmen six years ago became the first state employee union to agree to help fund retiree health benefits.
While the engineers’ tentative contract does not technically affect the other unions because they bargain separately, generally agreements reached earlier tend to establish limits for later pacts. Terms of the deal are likely to be applied to three other state worker bargaining units without contracts and more than a dozen others whose contracts expire next year, ultimately affecting the entire state workforce.
The new payment toward health care could be at least partially offset by raises. The engineers’ deal – retroactive to July 2 – gives the union’s 13,000 members a 5 percent raise in July 2016 with a 2 percent raise one year later. It is set to expire on June 30, 2018.
Last year, then-Controller John Chiang pegged the unfunded liability of the state providing health and dental benefits for its retirees at $71.8 billion as of mid-2014. The balance is particularly burdensome because unlike guaranteed public employee pensions, which are funded as employees remain on the job, the state only covers what’s needed to pay for the costs as they come due.
Bruce Blanning, the engineers union’s executive director, cited the pension issue in describing how the negotiating team approached the new contribution. In 2011, most state workers began paying an additional 3 percent toward their retirement benefits, a figure offset by employee raises.
“I think it’s a reasonable ask,” Blanning said of the health care piece. “The administration wanted to start jointly putting aside money … to build up a fund, and from our end of it, (we thought) ‘OK, that’s an understandable objective.’”
Unionized state engineers are among the highest-paid employees in government, with regular annual pay averaging $94,147 for calendar 2014, according to state payroll data. They last received a 3.3 percent raise on July 1.
The engineers union released news about the raises to the media on Monday. It waited until Tuesday, however, to publicly disclose the new out-of-pocket costs because it wanted to break that news directly to its members first.
Some agreements contain “most-favored nation” clauses that allow a union to reopen talks if a later contract with another group is more generous. The engineers’ contract, however, does not contain such a clause.
See also:

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California to have state-wide mandatory water restrictions Aug. 1

Folsom Lake reservoirFolsom Lake is a reservoir in Northern California

Yesterday, July 15, 2014, California’s State Water Resources Control Board voted to impose mandatory statewide water-use restrictions for the first time in state history, effective August 1.
Fines of up to $500 a day will be imposed on businesses and individuals for wasting water on landscaping, washing cars without a shut-off nozzle or other outdoor uses.
The new restrictions are prompted by California’s 3-year drought and by the results of a water-use survey showing that overall consumption in California actually increased 1% in 2014, despite pleas from Democrat Gov. Jerry Brown for residents and businesses to voluntarily cut back use by 20%. The increased usage is attributable to two regions of the state: Southern California coastal communities (Hollywood!) and the far northeastern slice of the state.
While no region of California met Brown’s request for a 20% reduction, some came closer than others:

  • Communities that draw from the Sacramento River reduced consumption the most, by 13%.
  • The North Coast reduced consumption by 12%.
  • San Francisco Bay Area and Southern California cities that draw from the Colorado River decreased water use by 5%.

Cities and suburbs use about 20% of the state’s water, with about half going outdoors. Agriculture is by far the greatest water user, accounting for 75% of consumption in the state.
The sweeping list of mandates from the state includes:

  • A ban on watering down sidewalks and driveways — except for sanitation purposes, e.g., allowing cities to power-wash alleyways to get rid of human waste left by homeless people, to scrub away graffiti, and to remove oil and grease from parking structure floors.
  • No more washing a vehicle or boat without a shut-off nozzle on the hose.
  • Fountains must use recycled water.
  • No watering so much as to cause runoff.

Fines of up to $500 for individuals and $10,000 for water districts could be issued for non-compliance.
It will be up to local governments and water districts to decide how to implement the mandates. The full $500-a-day fine, considered an infraction, could be reserved for repeat violators, for example. Others might receive warnings or smaller fines based on a sliding scale.
State Water Board Chair Felicia Marcus said, “The state cannot be in a situation where this goes two, three, four years and we’re dealing with massive numbers of cities running out of water. Our intention is that it would be enforceable at the local level by any enforcement capability local agencies currently have. We are trying not to reinvent any wheel.”
If fines fail to promote conservation, Marcus said the board would consider other steps such as requiring water districts to stop leaks in their pipes, which account for an estimated 10% of water use, stricter landscape restrictions and encouraging water agencies to boost rates for consumers who use more than their share of water.
Sources: CBS San Francisco; AP
And yet California is adding to the state population by receiving untold numbers from the “surge” of illegals crossing the US-Mexico border.
And yet, despite the ever-increasing population and therefore water users, the state government is doing NOTHING to increase water supply by building more reservoirs and dams because of opposition from environmentalists green Nazis.
~Eowyn

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The Lucifer Alliance: Secret group of powerful leftwing moneybags

Did you know that in 2012, the State of California “contributed” more than any other state to President Lucifer’s reelection campaign? And most of California’s campaign contributions came from the Los Angeles-Long Beach metro area (think Hollywood), second only to Washington, D.C. and New York City.

Playing an important role in California’s campaign contributions to the POS is a secret, invitation-only group of leftist moneybags who call themselves the Democracy Alliance, which funneled some $100 million into the 2012 election.

Given the group’s leftwing ideological proclivities — pro-Obama, amnesty for illegals, gun control, climate change, abortion, gay “rights” — it should more appropriately be called the Lucifer Alliance. And that’s how I’ll refer to the group in this essay.

Although the Democracy Lucifer Alliance discloses neither its members nor its beneficiaries, information has leaked out over time. Three of its members are very well known. They are:

  1. The old goat, George Soros: billionaire international currency speculator and backer of President Lucifer. On April 9, 2007, Soros held a fund-raiser for Obama where this picture was taken:

Soros fundraiser

2. Chris Hughes: The 29-year-old co-founder of Facebook.

Chris_Hughes

3. Peter Lewis, chairman of Progressive Insurance (which is why you should not buy your auto insurance from Progressive!):

In early May of this year, the group held a 5-day semi-annual conference in a luxury ocean-front resort in Laguna Beach, Calif., to which the Los Angeles Times was granted exclusive access.

Matea Gold reports for the L.A. Times, May 4, 2013, that the Democracy  Lucifer Alliance is an influential network of some of America’s wealthiest “liberal” political donors. Comprised of roughly 100 members who pay annual dues of $30,000, the Alliance itself does not make donations. Instead it requires its members to contribute at least $200,000 a year to organizations in the Alliance’s portfolio.

The group intentionally has a low profile and  “carries significant sway on the left,” with deep-pocketed members like Soros, Hughes, and Lewis. Rob McKay, a San Francisco-based philanthropist is the Lucifer Alliance’s chairman.

Since its founding by strategist Rob Stein in 2005, the Democracy Lucifer Alliance has contributed some $500 million toward “progressive” leftwing candidates and causes, including the “liberal” think tank Center for American Progress; Media Matters for America, which aims to debunk conservative claims; and Catalist, which maintains a voter database used to help campaigns target potential supporters.

At the Laguna Beach conference, the group selected the pro-Obama Organizing for Action (OFA) and immigration reform groups such as the National Immigration Forum as some of its top 2013 funding priorities.

OFA is a nonprofit group formed by the POS’s top political aides that has been pressing for Congress to pass a universal background check for gun buyers, among other issues. The Democracy Lucifer Alliance has brought in about $5 million for OFA in the first quarter of 2013, with a goal to raise a total of $50 million by year’s end.

The Laguna Beach conference drew more than 150 donors and activists for sessions on topics such as the economy, gun control and climate change. Among the activists pitching to the donors was OFA executive director Jon Carson. Speakers at the conference included California Gov. Jerry Brown, California Lt. Gov. and former San Francisco mayor Gavin Newsom, and Robert Reich, Secretary of Labor in the Clinton Administration.

By the end of the conference, members had pledged to distribute $50 million this year to an array of groups on the left, a sum leaders said was particularly impressive in light of last year’s costly election campaign.

Stay tuned for Part II of “The Lucifer Alliance,” on the names and identities of 38 less-famous but equally pernicious members of the Alliance!

H/t California Political News & Views and  Matthew Continetti of the Free Beacon.

~Eowyn

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This is what 4 more years of Obama look like

Just ask any Californian or move there!

California’s Not Dreamin’: This Is the Nightmare of an Obama Second Term

By Roger Hedgecock, former Mayor of San Diego
I live in California. If you were wondering what living in Obama’s 2nd term would be like, wonder no longer. We in California are living there now.
California is a 1-party state dominated by a virulent Democrat Left enabled by a complicit media where every agency of local, county, and state government is run by and for the public employee unions. The unemployment rate is 12%.
California has more folks on food stamps than any other state, has added so many benefits and higher rates to Medicaid that we call it “Medi-Cal.” Our K-12 schools have more administrators than teachers, with smaller classes but lower test scores and higher dropout rates with twice the per-student budget of 15 years ago. Good job, Brownie.
This week, the once and current Gov. Jerry “Moonbeam” Brown had to confess that the “balanced” state budget adopted 5 months ago was billions in the red because actual tax revenues were billions lower than the airy-fairy revenue estimates on which the balance was predicated.
After trimming legislators’ perks and reducing the number of cell phones provided to state civil servants, the governor intoned that drastic budget reductions had already hollowed out state programs for the needy, law enforcement and our schoolchildren. California government needed more money.
Echoing the Occupy movement, the governor proclaimed the rich must pay their fair share.
Fair share…?
The top 1% of California income earners currently pays 50% of the state’s income tax.
California has 7 income tax brackets. The top income tax rate is 9.3%, which is slapped on the greedy rich earning at least $47,056 a year. Income of more than $1 million pays the “millionaires’ and billionaires'” surcharge tax rate of 10.3%.
Brown’s proposal would add 2% for income over $250,000. A million-dollar income would then be taxed at 12.3%. And that’s just for the state.
Brown also proposed a .5¢ sales tax increase, which would bring sales taxes (which vary by county) up to 7.75% to as much as 10%. Both tax increases would be on the ballot in 2012.
The sales tax increase proposal immediately brought howls of protest from the Left (of Brown!). Charlie Eaton, a sociology grad student at UC Berkeley and leader of the UC Student-Workers Union, said, “We’ve paid enough. It’s time for millionaires to pay.”
At least 5 other ballot measures to raise taxes are circulating for signatures to get on the 2012 ballot in California. The governor’s proposals are the most conservative.
The Obama way doesn’t end with taxes.
The governor and the state legislature continue to applaud the efforts of the California High Speed Rail Authority to build a train connecting Los Angeles and San Francisco. Even though the budget is three times the voter-approved amount, and the first segment will only connect two small towns in the agricultural Central Valley. But hey, if we build it, they will ride.
And we don’t want to turn down the Obama bullet-train bucks Florida and other states rejected because the operating costs would bankrupt them. Can’t happen here because we’re already insolvent.
If we get into real trouble with the train, we’ll just bring in the Chinese. It worked with the Bay Bridge reconstruction. After the 1989 earthquake, the bridge connecting Oakland and San Francisco was rebuilt with steel made in China. Workers from China too. Paid for with money borrowed from China. Makes perfect sense.
In California, we hate the evil, greedy rich (except the rich in Hollywood, in sports, and in drug dealing). But we love people who have broken into California to eat the bounty created by the productive rich.
Illegals get benefits from various generous welfare programs, free medical care, free schools for their kids, including meals, and of course, instate tuition rates and scholarships too. Nothing’s too good for our guests.
To erase even a hint of criticism of illegal immigration, the California Legislature is considering a unilateral state amnesty. Democrat State Assemblyman Felipe Fuentes has proposed an initiative that would bar deportation of illegals from California.
Interesting dilemma for Obama there. If immigration is exclusively a federal matter, and Obama has sued four states for trying to enforce federal immigration laws he won’t enforce, what will the President do to a California law that exempts California from federal immigration law?
California is also near fulfilling the environmentalist dream of deindustrialization.
After driving out the old industrial base (auto and airplane assembly, for example), air and water regulators and tax policies are now driving out the high-tech, biotech and even Internet-based companies that were supposed to be California’s future.
The California cap-and-trade tax on business in the name of reducing CO2 makes our state the leader in wacky environmentalism and guarantees a further job exodus from the state.
Even green energy companies can’t do business in California. Solyndra went under, taking its taxpayer loan guarantee with it.
No job is too small to escape the regulators. The state has even banned weekend amateur gold miners from the historic gold mining streams in the Sierra Nevada Mountains.
In fact, more and more of California’s public land is off-limits to recreation by the people who paid for that land. Unless you’re an illegal. Then you can clear the land, set up marijuana plantations at will, bring in fertilizers that legal farmers can no longer use, exploit illegal farm workers who live in hovels with no running water or sanitation, and protect your investment with armed illegals carrying guns no California citizen is allowed to own.
The rest of us only found out about these plantations when the workers’ open campfire started one of those devastating fires that have killed hundreds of people and burned out thousands of homes in California over the last decade.
It’s often said that whatever happens in California will soon happen in your state.
You’d better hope that’s wrong.
[End of Hedgecock’s essay]
These are all California State agencies:
California Academic Performance Index (API) * California Access for Infants and Mothers * California Acupuncture Board * California Administrative Office of the Courts * California Adoptions Branch * California African American Museum * California Agricultural Export Program * California Agricultural Labor Relations Board * California Agricultural Statistics Service * California Air Resources Board (CARB) * California Allocation Board * California Alternative Energy and Advanced Transportation Financing Authority * California Animal Health and Food Safety Services * California Anti-Terrorism Information Center * California Apprenticeship Council * California Arbitration Certification Program * California Architects Board * California Area VI Developmental Disabilities Board * California Arts Council * California Asian Pacific Islander Legislative Caucus * California Assembly Democratic Caucus * California Assembly Republican Caucus  * California Athletic Commission * California Attorney General * California Bay Conservation and Development Commission * California Bay-Delta Authority * California Bay-Delta Office * California Bio Diversity Council * California Board for Geologists and Geophysicists * California Board for Professional Engineers and Land Surveyors * California Board of Accountancy * California Board of Barbering and Cosmetology * California Board of Behavioral Sciences * California Board of Chiropractic Examiners * California Board of Equalization (BOE) * California Board of Forestry and Fire Protection * California Board of Guide Dogs for the Blind * California Board of Occupational Therapy * California Board of Optometry * California Board of Pharmacy * California Board of Podiatric Medicine * California Board of Prison Terms * California Board of Psychology * California Board of Registered Nursing * California Board of Trustees * California Board of Vocational  Nursing and Psychiatric Technicians * California Braille and Talking Book Library * California Building Standards Commission * California Bureau for Private Post Secondary and Vocational Education * California Bureau of Automotive Repair * California Bureau of Electronic and Appliance Repair * California Bureau of Home Furnishings and Thermal Insulation * California Bureau of Naturopathic Medicine * California Bureau of Security and Investigative Services * California Bureau of State Audits * California Business Agency * California Business Investment Services (CalBIS) * California Business Permit Information (CalGOLD) * California Business Portal * California Business, Transportation and Housing Agency * California Cal Grants * California CalJOBS * California Cal-Learn Program * California CalVet Home Loan Program * California Career Resource Network * California Cemetery and Funeral Bureau * California Center for Analytical Chemistry * California  Center for Distributed Learning * California Center for Teaching Careers (Teach California) * California Chancellors Office * California Charter Schools * California Children and Families Commission * California Children and Family Services Division * California Citizens Compensation Commission * California Civil Rights Bureau * California Coastal Commission * California Coastal Conservancy * California Code of Regulations * California Collaborative Projects with UC Davis * California Commission for Jobs and Economic Growth * California Commission on Aging * California Commission on Health and Safety and Workers Compensation * California Commission on Judicial Performance * California Commission on State Mandates * California Commission on Status of Women * California Commission on Teacher Credentialing * California Commission on the Status of Women * California Committee on Dental Auxiliaries * California Community Colleges Chancellors Office, Junior  Colleges * California Community Colleges Chancellors Office * California Complaint Mediation Program * California Conservation Corps * California Constitution Revision Commission * California Consumer Hotline * California Consumer Information Center * California Consumer Information * California Consumer Services Division * California Consumers and Families Agency * California Contractors State License Board * California Corrections Standards Authority * California Council for the Humanities * California Council on Criminal Justice * California Council on Developmental Disabilities * California Court Reporters Board * California Courts of Appeal * California Crime and Violence Prevention Center * California Criminal Justice Statistics Center * California Criminalist Institute Forensic Library * California CSGnet Network Management * California Cultural and Historical Endowment * California Cultural Resources Division * California Curriculum and  Instructional Leadership Branch * California Data Exchange Center * California Data Management Division * California Debt and Investment Advisory Commission * California Delta Protection Commission * California Democratic Caucus * California Demographic Research Unit * California Dental Auxiliaries * California Department of Aging * California Department of Alcohol and Drug Programs * California Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control Appeals Board * California Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control * California Department of Boating and Waterways (Cal Boating) * California Department of Child Support Services (CDCSS) * California Department of Community Services and Development * California Department of Conservation * California Department of Consumer Affairs * California Department of Corporations * California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation * California Department of Developmental Services * California Department of Education   California Department of Fair Employment and Housing * California Department of Finance * California Department of Financial Institutions * California Department of Fish and Game * California Department of Food and Agriculture * California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (CDF) * California Department of General Services * California Department of General Services, Office of State Publishing * California Department of Health Care Services * California Department of Housing and Community Development * California Department of Industrial Relations (DIR) * California Department of Insurance * California Department of Justice Firearms Division * California Department of Justice Opinion Unit * California Department of Justice, Consumer Information, Public Inquiry Unit * California Department of Justice * California Department of Managed Health Care * California Department of Mental Health * California Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) * California  Department of Personnel Administration * California Department of Pesticide Regulation * California Department of Public Health * California Department of Real Estate * California Department of Rehabilitation * California Department of Social Services Adoptions Branch * California Department of Social Services * California Department of Technology Services Training Center (DTSTC) * California Department of Technology Services (DTS) * California Department of Toxic Substances Control * California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) * California Department of Veterans Affairs (CalVets) * California Department of Water Resources * California Departmento de Vehiculos Motorizados * California Digital Library * California Disabled Veteran Business Enterprise Certification Program * California Division of Apprenticeship Standards * California Division of Codes and Standards * California Division of Communicable Disease Control * California Division of  Engineering * California Division of Environmental and Occupational Disease Control * California Division of Gambling Control * California Division of Housing Policy Development * California Division of Labor Standards Enforcement * California Division of Labor Statistics and Research * California Division of Land and Right of Way * California Division of Land Resource Protection * California Division of Law Enforcement General Library * California Division of Measurement Standard
s * California Division of Mines and Geology * California Division of Occupational Safety and Health (Cal/OSHA) * California Division of Oil, Gas and Geothermal Resources * California Division of Planning and Local Assistance * California Division of Recycling * California Division of Safety of Dams * California Division of the State Architect * California Division of Tourism * California Division of Workers Compensation Medical Unit * California Division of Workers  Compensation * California Economic Assistance, Business and Community Resources * California Economic Strategy Panel * California Education and Training Agency * California Education Audit Appeals Panel * California Educational Facilities Authority * California Elections Division * California Electricity Oversight Board * California Emergency Management Agency * California Emergency Medical Services Authority * California Employment Development Department (EDD) * California Employment Information State Jobs * California Employment Training Panel * California Energy Commission * California Environment and Natural Resources Agency * California Environmental Protection Agency (Cal/EPA) * California Environmental Resources Evaluation System (CERES) * California Executive Office * California Export Laboratory Services * California Exposition and State Fair (Cal Expo) * California Fair Political Practices Commission * California Fairs and Expositions Division  * California Film Commission * California Fire and Resource Assessment Program * California Firearms Division * California Fiscal Services * California Fish and Game Commission * California Fisheries Program Branch * California Floodplain Management * California Foster Youth Help * California Franchise Tax Board (FTB) * California Fraud Division * California Gambling Control Commission * California Geographic Information Systems Council (GIS) * California Geological Survey * California Government Claims and Victim Compensation Board * California Governors Committee for Employment of Disabled Persons * California Governors Mentoring Partnership * California Governors Office of Emergency Services * California Governors Office of Homeland Security * California Governors Office of Planning and Research * California Governors Office * California Grant and Enterprise Zone Programs HCD Loan * California Health and Human Services Agency * California Health and  Safety Agency * California Healthy Families Program * California Hearing Aid Dispensers Bureau * California High-Speed Rail Authority * California Highway Patrol (CHP) * California History and Culture Agency * California Horse Racing Board * California Housing Finance Agency * California Indoor Air Quality Program * California Industrial Development Financing Advisory Commission * California Industrial Welfare Commission * California InFoPeople * California Information Center for the Environment * California Infrastructure and Economic Development Bank (I-Bank) * California Inspection Services * California Institute for County Government * California Institute for Education Reform * California Integrated Waste Management Board * California Interagency Ecological Program * California Job Service * California Junta Estatal de Personal * California Labor and Employment Agency * California Labor and Workforce Development Agency * California Labor Market  Information Division * California Land Use Planning Information Network (LUPIN) * California Lands Commission * California Landscape Architects Technical Committee * California Latino Legislative Caucus * California Law Enforcement Branch * California Law Enforcement General Library * California Law Revision Commission * California Legislative Analyst’s Office * California Legislative Black Caucus * California Legislative Counsel * California Legislative Division * California Legislative Information * California Legislative Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Caucus * California Legislature Internet Caucus * California Library De velopment Services * California License and Revenue Branch * California Major Risk Medical Insurance Program * California Managed Risk Medical Insurance Board * California Maritime Academy * California Marketing Services * California Measurement Standards * California Medical Assistance Commission * California  Medical Care Services * California Military Department * California Mining and Geology Board * California Museum for History, Women, and the Arts * California Museum Resource Center * California National Guard * California Native American Heritage Commission * California Natural Community Conservation Planning Program * California New Motor Vehicle Board * California Nursing Home Administrator Program * California Occupational Safety and Health Appeals Board * California Occupational Safety and Health Standards Board * California Ocean Resources Management Program * California Office of Administrative Hearings * California Office of Administrative Law * California Office of AIDS * California Office of Binational Border Health * California Office of Child Abuse Prevention * California Office of Deaf Access * California Office of Emergency Services (OES) * California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment * California Office of Fiscal Services *  California Office of Fleet Administration * California Office of Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) Implementation (CalOHI) * California Office of Historic Preservation * California Office of Homeland Security * California Office of Human Resources * California Office of Legal Services * California Office of Legislation * California Office of Lieutenant Governor * California Office of Military and Aerospace Support * California Office of Mine Reclamation * California Office of Natural Resource Education * California Office of Privacy Protection * California Office of Public School Construction * California Office of Real Estate Appraisers * California Office of Risk and Insurance Management * California Office of Services to the Blind * California Office of Spill Prevention and Response * California Office of State Publishing (OSP) * California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development * California Office of Systems  Integration * California Office of the Inspector General * California Office of the Ombudsman * California Office of the Patient Advocate * California Office of the President * California Office of the Secretary for Education * California Office of the State Fire Marshal * California Office of the State Public Defender * California Office of Traffic Safety * California Office of Vital Records * California Online Directory * California Operations Control Office * California Opinion Unit * California Outreach and Technical Assistance Network (OTAN) * California Park and Recreation Commission * California Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) * California Performance Review (CPR) * California Permit Information for Business (CalGOLD) * California Physical Therapy Board * California Physician Assistant Committee * California Plant Health and Pest Prevention Services * California Policy and Evaluation Division * California Political Reform Division *  California Pollution Control Financing Authority * California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo * California Postsecondary Education Commission * California Prevention Services * California Primary Care and Family Health * California Prison Industry Authority * California Procurement Division * California Public Employees Retirement System (CalPERS) * California Public Employment Relations Board (PERB) * California Public Utilities Commission (PUC) * California Real Estate Services Division * California Refugee Programs Branch * California Regional Water Quality Control Boards * California Registered Veterinary Technician Committee * California Registrar of Charitable Trusts * California Republican Caucus * California Research and Development Division * California Research Bureau * California Resources Agency * California Respiratory Care Board * California Rivers Assessment * California Rural Health Policy Council * Ca
lifornia Safe Schools  * California San Francisco Bay Conservation and Development Commission * California San Gabriel and Lower Los Angeles Rivers and Mountains Conservancy * California San Joaquin River Conservancy * California School to Career * California Science Center * California Scripps Institution of Oceanography * California Secretary of State Business Portal * California Secretary of State * California Seismic Safety Commission * California Self Insurance Plans (SIP) * California Senate Office of Research * California Small Business and Disabled Veteran Business Enterprise Certification Program * California Small Business Development Center Program * California Smart Growth Caucus * California Smog Check Information Center * California Spatial Information Library * California Special Education Division * California Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology Board * California Standardized Testing and Reporting (STAR) * California Standards and Assessment Division *  California State Administrative Manual (SAM) * California State Allocation Board * California State and Consumer Services Agency * California State Architect * California State Archives * California State Assembly * California State Association of Counties (CSAC) * California State Board of Education * California State Board of Food and Agriculture *California Office of the Chief Information Officer (OCIO) * California State Children’s Trust Fund * California State Compensation Insurance Fund * California State Contracts Register Program * California State Contracts Register * California State Controller * California State Council on Developmental Disabilities (SCDD) * California State Disability Insurance (SDI) * California State Fair (Cal Expo) * California State Jobs Employment Information * California State Lands Commission * California State Legislative Portal * California State Legislature * California State Library Catalog * California State  Library Services Bureau * California State Library * California State Lottery * California State Mediation and Conciliation Service * California State Mining and Geology Board * California State Park and Recreation Commission * California State Parks * California State Personnel Board * California State Polytechnic University, Pomona * California State Railroad Museum * California State Science Fair * California State Senate * California State Summer School for Mathematics and Science (COSMOS) * California State Summer School for the Arts * California State Superintendent of Public Instruction * California State Teachers Retirement System (CalSTRS) * California State Treasurer * California State University Center for Distributed Learning * California State University, Bakersfield * California State University, Channel Islands * California State University, Chico * California State University, Dominguez Hills * California State University, East Bay *  California State University, Fresno * California State University, Fullerton * California State University, Long Beach * California State University, Los Angeles * California State University, Monterey Bay * California State University, Northridge * California State University, Sacramento * California State University, San Bernardino * California State University, San Marcos * California State University, Stanislaus * California State University (CSU) * California State Water Project Analysis Office * California State Water Project * California State Water Resources Control Board * California Structural Pest Control Board * California Student Aid Commission * California Superintendent of Public Instruction * California Superior Courts * California Tahoe Conservancy * California Task Force on Culturally and Linguistically Competent Physicians and Dentists * California Tax Information Center * California Technology and Administration Branch Finance *  California Telecommunications Division * California Telephone Medical Advice Services (TAMS) * California Transportation Commission * California Travel and Transportation Agency * California Unclaimed Property Program * California Unemployment Insurance Appeals Board * California Unemployment Insurance Program * California Uniform Construction Cost Accounting Commission * Claims Board * California Volunteers * California VoCalifornia Veterans Board * California Veterans Memorial * California Veterinary Medical Board and Registered Veterinary Technician Examining Committee * California Veterinary Medical Board * California Victim Compensation and Government ter Registration * California Water Commission * California Water Environment Association (COWPEA) * California Water Resources Control Board * California Welfare to Work Division * California Wetlands Information System * California Wildlife and Habitat Data Analysis Branch * California Wildlife  Conservation Board * California Wildlife Programs Branch I
California Work Opportunity and Responsibility to Kids (CalWORKs) * California Workers Compensation Appeals Board * California Workforce and Labor Development Agency * California Workforce nvestment Board * California Youth Authority (CYA) * Central Valley Flood Protection Board * Center for California Studies * Colorado River Board of California * Counting California * Dental Board of California * Health Insurance Plan of California (PacAdvantage) * Humboldt State University * Jobs with the State of California * Judicial Council of California * Learn California * Library of California * Lieutenant Governors Commission for One California * Little Hoover Commission (on California State Government Organization and Economy) * Medical Board of California * Medi-Cal * Osteopathic Medical Board of California * Physical Therapy Board of California * Regents of the University of California * San Diego  State University * San Francisco State University * San Jose State University * Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy * State Bar of California * Supreme Court of California * Teach California * University of California * University of California, Berkeley * University of California, Davis * University of California, Hastings College of the Law * University of California, Irvine * University of California, Los Angeles * University of California, Merced * University of California, Riverside * University of California, San Diego * University of California, San Francisco * University of California, Santa Barbara * University of California, Santa Cruz *
But when it comes to budget cuts, Gov. Jerry Brown and the Democrat-controlled state legislature can only think of cuts to police, fire, and education. Go figure!
A big h/t to FOTM’s beloved Lady Wendy.
~Eowyn

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Hell freezes over: Domocrat governor tells welfare recipients to work

When America was awash in money, before the economy tanked in 2008, our largesse overflowed.
Result: welfare abuses such as this:
[youtube=https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=bavou_SEj1E]
Read more about this welfare-abusing single mom here.
Daniel Weintraub reports forHealthy Cal, Jan. 12, 2012, that faced with state deficits in billions of dollars, California’s Democrat Governor Jerry Brown is doing the unthinkable:

Gov. Jerry Brown is proposing the most far-reaching changes to welfare since former President Bill Clinton and Congress overhauled the program 15 years ago.

Brown wants to cut $1 billion from the program — nearly one-third of its general fund budget — by shortening the amount of time recipients can remain on aid and focusing the state’s cash assistance and child care subsidies on people who are moving from welfare to work.

His plan has won initial praise from the state’s independent budget analyst. But advocates for the poor say it would further marginalize the state’s already struggling underclass. And Democratic leaders in the Legislature have said they will delay any action on the proposal until after the governor’s March 1 deadline, in the hopes that state tax revenues will come in higher than Brown anticipates.

While a common perception of welfare is a program that supports poor, unproductive people, the program has morphed over the past decade into one that provides not just cash grants but job training and services to help people enter the workforce. And more than anything, it is a program that supports children. More than 1 million of the 1.4 million people helped by the program are children.

It is also a program which, while never a major part of the state budget, has shrunk dramatically over the past generation.

In the mid-1990s, when welfare was an entitlement with no work or education obligations and no time limit, more than 900,000 families were on aid in California. But in 1996 then-President Clinton and Congress agreed on a fundamental restructuring of the program. Aid would no longer be open-ended, and states were required to move a certain percentage of their cases from welfare to work.

These changes altered the mindset of the program from one of providing subsistence grants to one that became more of a bridge to employment. In California, recipients were given a five-year time limit (recently reduced to four years) and they got more access to education, job training and child care to help them move into the workforce.

Even the name of the program was changed to reflect the new attitude, from Aid to Families with Dependent Children to Temporary Assistance for Needy Families and, finally, to Cal-Works. [The current name, Cal-Works, of course is oxymoronic. George Orwell would be so proud of California! -Eowyn]

For a time, the changes in the rules and the philosophy seemed to work. They coincided with a late-1990s economy that was bolstered by the technology boom, and the number of welfare cases dropped in half, to 460,000 by 2007.

The cases that remained, however, were the toughest: people whose lack of education, job skills or experience made them very difficult to employ. As the economy slid into a recession, those people found it nearly impossible to find jobs, and they were joined on the rolls by more families headed by newly jobless parents.

The welfare caseload began to grow again. By next year, if nothing is done, about 600,000 families will be on welfare in California. The cost of the program will grow by half a billion dollars.

[…] Brown has proposed what can only be described as a radical restructuring of the program.

His most dramatic proposal is to reduce the time limit from its current 48 months to just 24 months for people who fail to find unsubsidized employment. The adults would be kicked off aid and denied other services, but the families would continue to collect assistance for the children.

People who found jobs within their first two years on welfare but whose incomes still qualified them for aid would be allowed to remain in the program for a total of 48 months. And they would be allowed to keep more of what they earned. For the average family of three, the change would amount to an increase of $44 a month.

And while those families who remained on welfare with parents working would continue to be eligible for state-subsidized child care, many other families would lose this benefit. On one end, Brown would limit eligibility to just those parents who were meeting the state’s work requirement, leaving many low-income or penniless families out of child care altogether. On the other end of the scale, he would reduce the income eligibility threshold from 70 percent of the state’s median family income to about 62 percent, ending subsidized child care for families earning anything more than twice the federal poverty level. This would result in an estimated 62,000 children losing child care, out of about 296,000 who get it from the state today.

Brown wants the changes in welfare to take effect by October of this year. While the time limits on aid would apply retroactively, Brown proposes giving all recipients six months to find work before kicking them off the rolls. The counties would get $35 million in one-time funds from the state to help people ready themselves for work and find jobs.

But Brown acknowledges that few of the long-term cases would find work. His administration estimates that welfare cases would plummet next year from a projected 597,000 families to just 324,000, a reduction of 44 percent. Nearly 300,000 would be part of a new, separate program giving limited assistance, but few services, to the children in families headed by parents who could not, or refused, to work.

While Brown has proposed asking voters to raise taxes as part of his budget plan, the changes he suggests in welfare would take place with or without the tax increase. The state, he said, simply does not have enough money to do all the things it once did.

Welfare advocates and others say that the cuts will backfire, leaving more children in poverty and leading to social problems that will cost the state far more than the cuts would save in the long run. But Brown says he has no other choice than to propose changes that Democrats would have at one time would have considered cruel.

We can’t spend what we don’t have,” he said when he released his budget proposal in early January. “It’s not nice. We don’t like it. But the economy and the tax statutes of California make only so much money available. We have to spend it and make tough choices.”

“We can’t spend what we don’t have.” I wish that message would sink into the dense (or simply malevolent) noggin of that fraud in the White House.
H/t Stephen Frank’s California Political News & Views.
~Eowyn

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