Tag Archives: inclusivity

Progressive policies upset progressives: Oregon parents outraged by school’s holiday party guidelines

GIF-Giraffe-eating-Popcorn

Bethel School District is in Eugene, Oregon, which is extremely liberal.

From Register Guard: Parents in the Bethel School District are outraged. Their reason? No more school parties for Valentine’s Day.

The Bethel School Board will be holding a special board meeting Thursday evening after it was forced to call off a meeting Monday where more than 100 angry parents stormed the district office and refused to wait their turn to speak.

The group overflowed the small board room at the district office just after 7 p.m., reportedly yelling repeatedly at board members before board Chairwoman Dawnja Johnson adjourned the meeting about 30 minutes after it started.

At least one meeting attendee said board members turned their backs to members of the crowd while they were speaking out, and parents alleged that board members were rude to some people who came to the meeting. District spokesman Pat McGillivray later said the board members who did turn their backs, did so after the meeting was canceled.

In the past, students celebrated Valentine’s Day with the traditional exchange of cards and candy. But the district slowly has been phasing out those traditions for the past few years.

The new holiday guidelines have not been fully implemented at each school yet, but no schools in the Bethel district will have traditional Valentine’s Day parties — with candy and card exchanges — this year.

That prompted some parents to accuse the district of selectively “taking away” other traditional school holidays as well.

For instance, Bethel district students no longer wear costumes for Halloween, and Thanksgiving celebrations have been renamed “harvest parties.”

Such “reinventing” of traditional school holidays doesn’t sit well with some parents.

“It’s not just about Valentine’s Day,” said Ryan Hosek, a parent of two Prairie Mountain students. “They’re isolating the majority of kids’ feelings for the sake of a few, and that’s just not how the world works.  The lesson to be learned is to appreciate the difference and not ignore them because they make a small minority of people offended.”

District officials have said that organized holiday parties often end up excluding children whose parents don’t have the means to buy valentines, or students who don’t do well in a party setting, or students who don’t celebrate the holiday for religious or other reasons.

“As a public school system, we can’t intentionally plan events that we know will exclude children,” McGillivray said Tuesday. “Schools (in the district) are thinking creatively about how we celebrate with children and how we can have those activities at school where everyone gets to participate.”

McGillivray said each school in the district is taking a different approach to recognizing the virtues that Valentine’s Day celebrates, such as kindness and love. For instance, some schools are having friendship week, kindness month and buddy days, he said. There is no board rule against celebrating Valentine’s Day; in fact, students are allowed to bring Valentine’s Day cards to the school and hand them out to their classmates at the end of the school day, McGillivray said.

But parents who attended the meeting Monday night said that wasn’t the case at Prairie Mountain School a couple of weeks ago.

Lance Hughes, a parent of two Prairie Mountain students, said that he and his wife learned in early February that the school would not be celebrating Valentine’s Day, and that students should not bring cards or candy to school.

Hughes, in an interview Tuesday, said the movement to do away with holiday traditions has been gaining traction with the school district in recent years.

“The schools said it’s a financial thing and an inclusive thing, but talk to any parent at that meeting, and everyone has said they’ll pay for it,” Hughes said. “Removing holidays is not inclusive. That’s like telling a kid he can’t go outside to recess because he can’t afford a coat. If a kid can’t afford a coat, we find a way to pay for it.”

But other parents who were at the meeting Wednesday saw things differently.

Amanda Shrum, a parent of a Willamette High School student, described the crowd as disruptive, rude and frightening. “At one point, there were a couple of teen­agers who were crying, and several parents who were there with their children left as soon as people started shoving to get to the front of the room. … It was frightening,” she said.

Shrum, who was raised as a Jehovah Witness, said that she didn’t celebrate holidays as a child for religious reasons, so she felt excluded from certain situations at school.

“I was the kid who was told to just stay home or go to the library, and it was humiliating,” she said. “At that level, you can’t really explain to the other kids why you’re not participating; they just don’t understand.”

Shrum said she sympathizes with people who say that public school should be fun and include celebrations. “A lot of times, the Valentine’s cards can just bring cheer and words of encouragement, which I think is a great thing,” she said. “But we can flip that in a way that doesn’t involve holidays.”

In the Eugene district, celebrations vary from school to school and classroom to classroom, according to district spokeswoman Kerry Delf.

“Some schools — McCornack Elementary School and Holt Elementary School come to mind — they have a school-wide practice of not holding class Valentine celebrations and card/candy exchanges,” she said.

Parents and others will have a chance to voice their opinions at a special board meeting scheduled for 7 p.m. Thursday at Shasta Middle School.  “All of those who sign a card requesting to speak will be heard,” McGilliv­ray said.

DCG

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US schools to pick up on the UK trend to ban the term “best friends?”

inclusivity

From Daily Mail: Schools around the world are banning the term ‘best friends,’ stopping children from naming their favorite buddy in a bid to ensure classmates don’t feel left out. A New York psychologist says the trend that started in London is now spreading across the US.

‘The idea of banning the phrase “best friends” is a very intriguing social experiment,’ clinical psychologist Dr. Barbara Greenberg tells CBS in New York.

‘Let’s face it, you can’t ban somebody from having a close relationship, and you can’t really ban somebody from having a best friend but what the schools are trying to do is foster the idea of kids having more than a single friend,’ Greenberg says.

The movement, which is believed to have started in Prince George‘s school in South London, isn’t intended to discourage intimate friendships, but rather encourage more inclusivity, Greenberg says.

The idea is to increase the number of interactions a student may have with different members of his or her peer group.

It’s now garnered support from educators in America, Greenberg says, who is licensed to practice psychology in both Connecticut and New York, and personally believes the rationale behind the notion is strong.

‘I see kids come in all week long who are feeling dreadful because they are excluded and because they are either nobody’s best friend or their best friend has moved on,’ Greenberg says.

Jay Jacobs, who operates Timber Lake Camp in New York, stresses the downside of not fostering multiple relationships at a young age, for exactly that reason. ‘I think that there are pitfalls in just having one friend,’ Jacobs says. ‘Remember as you grow up, interests change, children go in different directions.’

Jacobs adds that counselors at Timber Lake, which alternates in location between Glen Cove in Winter and Shandake in Summer, have made it a point to promote a more inclusive environment for years.

His philosophy is that children will be better set up for success later in life if they get used to having a wider friend group at a young age.  ‘You can’t be on the soccer field and just be dealing with one child, they’re going to be interacting with a team,’ Jacobs says.

‘It’s about promoting kindness, looking to children to be kind to one another and to be aware of what it looks like when you’re not.’

DCG

In the name of inclusivity: Girls can’t say no to boys at elementary school dance

dr jeff stephens weber school district superintendent

Dr. Jeff Stephens, Superintendent of Weber School District in Utah

Apparently, a girl can’t turn down a dance because they will hurt someone’s feeeeeeelings. What a mixed message this school is sending to young girls.

From KCRG: (via CNN) — A Utah mom is upset about a school policy in which sixth grade girls can’t say “no” when boys ask them to dance. The mom says it sends the wrong message to the young students.

“Oh no, no honey. You guys are misunderstanding again. That`s not how it is,” said Natalie Richard.

When Richards sixth grade daughter told her she couldnt say no if a boy asked her to dance at Kanesville Elementarys valentines day dance, she didnt believe it at first. <strong>"The teacher said she cant. She has to say yes. She has to accept and I said excuse me?”

So Richard took her concerns to the school principal. “He basically just said theyve had this dance set up this way for a long time and theyve never had any concerns before,” Richard said.

Lane Findlay with the Weber School District confirms its a rule, but <em>its meant to teach students how to be inclusive.

“Please be respectful, be polite. We want to promote kindness and so we want you to say yes when someone asks you to dance,” said Findlay.

“I do see it from their perspective when it comes to that but there are many other ways to teach children how to be accepting than with a social dance,” Richard said.

Richard says forcing students not to say no teaches them the wrong lesson. “Sends a bad message to girls that girls have to say yes. Sends a bad message to boys that girls will – can`t say no,” Richard said.

Prior to the dance, which is voluntary, students are told to fill out a card, selecting five people they want to dance with. And the administration says if there`s someone on the card you feel uncomfortable with, the student is encouraged to speak up.

“If there is an issue, if theres students that are uncomfortable or have a problem with another student I mean thats certainly something that can be addressed with that student and parents,” said Findlay.

But Richard says rejection is part of life and at the end of the day, this policy is sending impressionable children the wrong message.

“Psychologically my daughter keeps coming to me and saying I cant say no to a boy. Thats the message kids are getting,” she said.


Contact Dr. Jeff Stephens of the Weber School District here.

h/t lophatt

DCG

Hollyweird libtard Jessica Chastain critizes her own all white magazine cover

la times mag cover

Jessica is so “woke” and such a proponent of “inclusivity” that she participated in this magazine cover (posing on bottom left), faced outrage over Twitter, then decided she better do some virtue signaling.

That’s probably because she’s got a new movie, Molly’s Game, to promote. She evidently doesn’t want another flop on her hands, like her gun control movie “Miss Sloane.”

Nice try at absolving your actions, honey.

From EW: Jessica Chastain has joined the chorus of outrage over a racially homogeneous magazine cover — of which she was a part.

Last week, the LA Times Magazine released a cover featuring six awards season contenders in this year’s Best Actress race: Annette Bening, Jessica Chastain, Diane Kruger, Margot Robbie, Saoirse Ronan, and Kate Winslet. Under this image of five blondes and one redhead, the magazine had the shockingly tone-deaf title of the feature: “A Shift in Focus.” Twitter was not amused.

Some of the cover’s critics specifically called out Chastain for taking part in the all-white photo and feature, as she has long been a vocal proponent of a more inclusive Hollywood. Saturday night, the actress didn’t directly respond to those who had addressed her, but did tweet her own criticisms of the all-white cover.

“It’s a sad look that there’s no WOC in this pic of us promoting our female lead [sic] films,” the two-time Oscar nominee — so far the only actress featured on the cover to comment on the controversy — tweeted. “The industry needs to become more inclusive in its storytelling. What were your favorite WOC lead films this year? I LOVED @salmahayek in #BeatriceAtDinner.”

Beyond Hayek’s Sundance drama, however, the actress (and her followers who responded) struggled to come up with a list of titles led by women of color.

The 2017 awards season felt like it might have marked the beginning of some positive change for the Hollywood awards game after the #OscarsSoWhite of years past, with Best Supporting Actor going to Mahershala Ali, Best Supporting Actress to Viola Davis, and Best Picture to Moonlight (despite a small mix-up). This year’s awards season scoreboard proves there’s still a long way to go when it comes to diverse storytelling: Just in the Best Actress race, represented by the LA Times by these six women, all 10 Golden Globes nominations and all five SAG nominations have gone to white actresses.

h/t Breitbart

DCG

School drops Halloween parade because it’s not “inclusive”

Judge Judy shakes head rolls eyes

From Fox News: A Massachusetts elementary school canceled its Halloween events and is celebrating “Black and Orange Spirit Day” instead.

The principal of Boyden Elementary School sent a letter to parents informing them that the annual Halloween costume parade was canceled amid concerns over inclusivity and safety.

“The costume parade is out of our ordinary routine and can be difficult for many students. Also, the parade is not inclusive of all the students, and it is our goal each and every day to ensure all student’s individual differences are respected,” the letter read in part.

On Friday, October 20, the school will have a Halloween party after school hours. But October 31 will be a “spirit day,” on which students can wear the colors black or orange, but not costumes.

Some parents are not happy about the changes to the Halloween festivities.

“We have numerous events at the school that are not ‘all inclusive,’ so if you cancel one event, you have to cancel them all,” parent Julie Rowre told Fox 25.

“Put a costume on. Parade down the street. Let them have their little time,” another parent told CBS Boston. “Why do you have to turn it into something political?”

“I think it’s a lot of political correctness,” a local resident said. “I think it’s a shame because Halloween is the funnest day of the year – next to Christmas – for children.”

DCG

Feminism promotes obesity: Extremely overweight actress Chrissy Metz is “inspiring”

chrissy metz

This is “inspiring”

Chrissy Metz is an actress who is 5’4” and weighs 400 pounds according to bodymeasurement.org. The CDC has a body mass index (BMI) calculator that measures Chrissy’s BMI as 30.0 and above – she is obese. Her normal weight range should be 108 to 145 pounds.

People who are overweight or obese are at higher risk for chronic conditions such as high blood pressure, diabetes, and high cholesterol. According to Stanford Health Care, because of Chrissy’s obesity she is also subject to bone and joint disease, heart disease, sleep apnea, cancer, and metabolic syndrome (a clustering of medical conditions).

Yet in today’s society, “body shaming” is taboo. Thanks to feminism, we are told to be inclusive, body accepting, body positive, loving, and blah, blah, blah.

The “fat acceptance movement” and “fat feminism” do nothing to promote healthy women. To accept an obese body is to imply that one has no control over their behaviors. Our bodies are changeable and an obese person should be able to accept that truth. By resigning themselves to the impression that their bodies can’t be changed, they just perpetuate victimhood.

How about telling the truth for once? Chrissy is obese and there is nothing inspiring or empowering about that.

From Yahoo: The fashion industry is becoming more inclusive — at a snail’s pace, perhaps, but with palpable momentum behind the march of progress. It’s largely thanks not to the industry itself but to everyday people, whose beauty and bodies have long been overlooked and who have now stepped forward, demanding to be seen.

Chastity Garner and CeCe Olisa are two of those people, and they’ve stepped into view first as plus-size lifestyle influencers and bloggers and presently as founders of the popular annual event known as theCURVYcon. Now in its third year, the body-positive, curve-embracing event will take place in New York City on Sept. 8 and 9, bringing designers, fitness experiences, influencers, and speakers to town — including none other than Chrissy Metz, who stars on This Is Us, to deliver the keynote address (you heard it hear first, folks). Another first? TheCURVYcon will be live-streamed on Yahoo Style, bringing insightful conversation to millions of people who can’t make the IRL event.

Olisa and Garner are dedicated to promoting visibility of different body types within the plus-size world. That, in addition to Metz’s Emmy nomination, made the beloved actress the ideal woman to represent theCURVYcon this year. “A lot of times, in our space, the women who are celebrated are hourglass women — they’re a size 10 to 14, like the perfect version of a ‘plus-size’ woman,” Garner tells Yahoo Style. “I feel like [for] having size diversity and getting out of that hourglass shape, Chrissy Metz is a great representative for that. We love Ashley Graham, but she’s definitely the poster child of what a plus-size model ‘should’ look like. Someone like Chrissy Metz, her body type is a little bit different — we’re so happy to celebrate that.”

Olisa adds: “Representation is so important, and just seeing people who look like you anywhere is great. So when the hottest show on television has a very visibly plus-size girl who is cute, and falling in love, and doing her thing on the show, it’s inspiring.

While current conversations might make it easy to believe that such a space for plus-size women has always existed in the fashion community (during New York Fashion Week, no less), the reality is that it’s a recent phenomenon, spurred on by Garner and Olisa’s insistence that the industry make room.

“If inclusion isn’t happening by invitation, then we’re just going to move in ourselves,” Olisa tells Yahoo Style.

Read the rest of the story here.

DCG