Tag Archives: inclusivity

Rapper Lizzo learning to love her insecurities: “I am fat, I am beautiful”

Girl, you are not fat. You are obese.

This womyn is 5’10” and weighs 250 pounds. Her BMI is 35.9 indicating her weight is in the obese category for adults of her height.

Trying to disguise her obesity as an “insecurity” or as a need for “inclusivity” does not change the realities of the physical effects of obesity.

As I said in a post last month, please pick a side. Obesity and health care costs continue to rise yet this body image is promoted as if there was no way to prevent it. All in the name of “inclusivity.”

From Yahoo: She’s famed for her upbeat anthems, but, in a new interview with CBS Sunday Morning, Lizzo admits that body-shaming remarks have taken a toll. The “Juice” singer and self-professed “band geek” — whose real name is Melissa Jefferson — tells the morning show’s Tracy Smith that receiving negative feedback is like getting a “mosquito bite.” At first it’s a minor annoyance, but over time it’s eating you alive.

“Somebody’s like, ‘Well, you know, you’re a big girl so you can never have short hair, you always have to have big hair because you’re a big girl,’” she says. “And they say that lovingly, but I’m like, that’s a little mosquito bite. You don’t even know it’s there, but soon you look up and you’re covered in mosquito bites and you’re like, ‘Oh my God, I have all of these things [scratching arms] but they were so normalized to me because they were so innocent.’

“[People] meant well but I had to peel back a lot of layers,” she adds.

While countless fans credit her and her music for making them feel empowered, the star says her own journey to self-confidence took real work.

“It’s not something you really change,” she says. “It’s something that you address and work on. I had to address every layer of insecurity. Because I can’t just be like, ‘Alright, my arm’s not jiggly and lumpy anymore’ — that’s delusional. You have to be like, ‘That’s not ugly to me anymore, and it’s not wrong to me, it’s beautiful to me.

And I think that is why I’m able to call myself fat, and people are like, ‘No!’ Even my friends. And I’m like, ‘B***h, you know I’m fat.’ I’m like, ‘Don’t say no. I am fat, I am beautiful.’

I think it’s because I learned to actually look all my insecurities in the face, call them by their name and fall in love with them.”

See also:

Calvin Klein promoting obesity under the guise of “inclusivity”
Gillette continues their quest to be “woke” by promoting obesity and transgenders
Feminists get it wrong: Study finds that normalization of plus-size fuels obesity epidemic

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Mattel introduces “gender neutral” Barbie

From Yahoo: Mattel, the company behind Barbie and American Girl, has announced a new line of gender neutral dolls called Creatable World. In the brand’s own words, it is “a doll line designed to keep labels out and invite everyone in — giving kids the freedom to create their own customizable characters again and again.”

The tagline for the dolls, “All Welcome,” is an accurate description of the toys that are something of a blank canvas and encourage creative play. Each doll retails for $29.99 and comes with short hair, a long haired wig, clothing and accessories that can be mixed up to create hundreds of looks.

“Toys are a reflection of culture and as the world continues to celebrate the positive impact of inclusivity, we felt it was time to create a doll line free of labels,” Kim Culmone, senior vice president of Mattel Fashion Doll Design, said in a statement.

Through research, we heard that kids don’t want their toys dictated by gender norms. This line allows all kids to express themselves freely which is why it resonates so strongly with them.”

Reactions to the gender-neutral Creatable World dolls were mixed. Many showed their love for the new toy. Others aren’t so supportive of the new member of the Mattel family.

This is not Mattel’s first foray into pushing the boundaries of what dolls represent to children in our changing culture. In 2016, Barbie got a major makeover, with the brand launching tall, curvy and petite versions of the iconic doll, which was also made available in a variety of skin tones and hair types for the first time.

The brand had faced facing longstanding criticism over the toy’s unrealistic proportions and lack of diversity, and the move came amid slumping sales for the brand, which launched in 1959.

Barbie’s proportions have changed slightly over the years, but Mattel has continued to face criticism for promoting an unrealistic body image to girls. The company has largely deflected criticism in the past, arguing that the doll’s various career choices — doctor, astronaut, businesswoman — support female empowerment, and denying that Barbie influences girls’ body image.

Barbie also launched its “Inspiring Woman Series” line in 2018 on International Women’s Day, calling it a “doll line dedicated to honor historical role models who paved the way for generations of girls to dream bigger than ever before.”

This August, they debuted the latest additions to its “Inspiring Women” Barbie collection: Rosa Parks and Sally Ride. The line includes other other notable figures, including Amelia Earhart, Katherine Johnson and Frida Kahlo.

And just this past February, Mattel announced a new member of Barbie’s “Barbie Fashionista” line — a doll in a wheelchair. A representative from Mattel told Yahoo Lifestyle that a doll with a wheelchair accessory is one of the most requested items from Barbie fans and within this line there are now two options to choose from.

Mattel seems to be shifting their focus as a brand from a single doll style to multiple options that reflect children’s lives and how they function in the world. Only time will tell if this cultural shift is here to stay.

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Unhealthy: Elle magazine features obese rapper in order to promote “inclusivity”

Lizzo is a 31-year-old rapper from Detroit. She’s all the rage now, even with failed presidential candidate Hillary Clinton tweeting about her. According to HuffPo, “It’s truly something.”

Whatever.

This obese womyn is being promoted by the media as a proud big girl. Lizzo has stated, “I’m 5’10”, I’m big and I’ve always been this way – even when I was young I always had this mental gigantism where I felt bigger than I actually was and I still do.”

Lizzo is 5’10” and weighs 250 pounds. Her BMI is 35.9 indicating her weight is in the obese category for adults of her height.

Her obesity is being promoted in the Elle fashion magazine as “What the World Needs Now Is More Lizzo.”

Excerpts from the Elle article pushing this obesity inclusivity:

“Also helpful: regular self-care, which goes hand in hand with her message of self-love. She’s become something of an icon for the latter, but as with her success as an artist, those feelings of confidence and empowerment are hard-earned. “I take self-love very seriously. And I take it seriously because when I was younger, I wanted to change everything about myself,” she says. “I didn’t love who I was.

And the reason I didn’t love who I was is because I was told I wasn’t lovable by the media, by [people at] school, by not seeing myself in beauty ads, by not seeing myself in television…by lack of representation. My self-hatred got so bad that I was fantasizing about being other people. But you can’t live your life trying to be somebody else. What’s the point?”

As with all thing progressive, creating your “own truths” is only what matters. Not reality. Hence being obese is now a form of “body positivity.”

Self care and empowerment does not mean putting your physical being in the obese category, ladies. Seriously.

Also, please pick a side. Obesity and health care costs continue to rise yet you promote this body image as if there was no way to prevent it. All in the name of “inclusivity.”

See also:

Calvin Klein promoting obesity under the guise of “inclusivity”
Gillette continues their quest to be “woke” by promoting obesity and transgenders
Feminists get it wrong: Study finds that normalization of plus-size fuels obesity epidemic

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Calvin Klein promoting obesity under the guise of “inclusivity”

From NY Post: This past spring you couldn’t miss her.

Commanding 4,000 square feet of premium Soho air space and wearing nothing by CK underwear, the indie rapper Chika gazed knowingly from Calvin Klein’s massive billboard — just like Kate Moss and Kendall Jenner before her.

But the 22-year-old musician’s proudly plus-size body type felt like a rebuke against the brand’s traditional muses and their famously skinny silhouettes.

The recent ad’s aftershocks included a feature in Time magazine, an InStyle interview and — thanks to a slew of Instagram tags — millions of digital impressions. But while Chika called her campaign coup a “happy surprise,” it was actually a deliberately canny move from Calvin Klein HQ.

Once the chicest name at New York Fashion Week, the brand didn’t even bother to present this past February nor is it on the show schedule that begins Friday.

Rather, Calvin Klein has recently slipped in its stilettos thanks to an ill-fated allegiance with designer Raf Simons, the beloved Belgian artiste who was named chief creative officer and lead designer in 2016. Simons’ collections were Vogue-lauded sensations but also retail duds thanks to their futuristic shapes and menacing graphics, many licensed from Warhol’s “Death and Disaster” series.

When Simons left the label in December, parent company PVH called his’ two-year tenure a “fashion miss,” and retail analysts estimated his otherworldly and sometimes just odd creations cost the label a whopping $240 million.

PVH stock plunged 7.4 percent in May. Calvin Klein shuttered its Fifth Avenue flagship and skipped the costly — but, in terms of high-profile publicity, major — Met Gala, where it used to host a table loaded with starlets including Margot Robbie and Emma Watson.

It seemed like a death knell. But some experts argue it could be a fresh start and a chance to shake off the cobwebs.

“Letting those things go is actually quite savvy,” says Tyler McCall, who analyzes retail strategy as editor-in-chief of Fashionista.com. “At first, there was a real sense of loss. Calvin was so legendary! But the brand pivoted quickly into what works: the underwear in extended sizing, the nostalgia for the ’90s, the push for diverse bodies in casting.”

Calvin Klein, once known for being a major trendsetter in youth culture — creating often controversial waves with ads starring a 15-year-old Brooke Shields, a skeletal Moss, a muscle-rippling Mark Wahlberg — is finally catching up to Gen Z’s more inclusive, individual idea of cool.

“Contrast that with a brand like Victoria’s Secret, who can’t acknowledge that women exist above a size 12. They very publicly excluded trans women and plus-size women from their runway. And now, their sales are tanking,” McCall adds. “Meanwhile, Calvin Klein . . . is actually listening to [young shoppers].”

According to company sources, the brand’s new strategy includes recruiting an invisible grid of “micro-influencers” (read: fun but not necessarily famous Instagrammers) to weave a new fan base for the brand.

The company’s chief marketing officer, Marie Gulin-Merle, told The Post: “We believe the most compelling and engaging campaigns are those that embrace not just diversity of race, body type, sexual orientation or gender identity, but also diversity of opinion and experience.”

That may explain why the new “#CKPartners” include dozens of plus-size women and men, along with sometime-models such as mental-health blogger Elena Sanchez, Sikh tailor Devkaran Singh Mattakul and disability advocate Kate Virginia posing in her wheelchair.

Of course, reliable thirst traps like Bella Hadid and Naomi Campbell sprawl across much of Calvin Klein’s billboard and Instagram real estate — but now they’re joined by trans bombshell Indya Moore and queer pop icon Beth Ditto, who smolders in plus-size lace lingerie.

Can embracing the full human spectrum, and shedding the waif look for good, save CK One from being CK Done?

Current numbers give a cautious thumbs-up, with the brand’s luxury fragrances claiming a quarter of the spots on Amazon’s bestseller list and its social-media followers surpassing American fashion titans Michael Kors and Ralph Lauren.

But the brand needs to follow through on its promise of inclusion by spotlighting more than one plus-size model at a time, whether it’s on a building or just a handheld phone screen.

As Essence beauty director Julee Wilson has said, inclusion “isn’t just right, it’s good business. Once brands understand the profits they are blatantly missing, hopefully things will get better.”

And if Calvin Klein likes anything more than getting cool cred, it’s getting back those missing profits.

See also:

Gillette continues their quest to be “woke” by promoting obesity and transgenders
Feminists get it wrong: Study finds that normalization of plus-size fuels obesity epidemic
Feminism promotes obesity: Extremely overweight actress Chrissy Metz is “inspiring”
Size 26 Tess Holliday leads an army of curvy models at London Fashion Week to promote “body positivity”

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Thomas the Train re-launches with “inclusive” and “gender-balanced” friends

Thomas the Train…where’s his gay friend?

Is it really that inclusive if there’s no homosexual or transgender train?

From Daily Mail: Children’s programme Thomas And Friends is to introduce an ‘inclusive’ gender-balanced, multicultural set of characters as part of a revamp.

The new series of the animated show about Thomas the Tank Engine and his Steam Team will see the beloved locomotive leave his home in Sodor to travel the world for the first time. He will meet other trains including Ashima from India, Yong Bao from China and Shane from Australia.

Now called Thomas And Friends: Big World! Big Adventures!, the brand’s biggest relaunch in its 73-year history will aim to appeal to a wider global audience.

There will also be a new theme tune for the show, a faster-paced format, increased humour and music, fantasy elements and dream sequences.

For the first time in the series’ history, Thomas will discover new countries and cultures by travelling to China, India and Australia.

The Steam Team, the core group of trains on the fictional island of Sodor, will now comprise three male and three female characters. Long-running favourites Percy, Gordon, James and Emily will be joined by additions Nia and Rebecca, along with Thomas.

Other new female characters, described by show bosses as ‘strong girl characters’, include Isla, an Australian flying doctor plane, Noor Jehan, a royal express engine from India, Hong-Mei, a number one blue tank engine from China, and female railway controller Charubala, from India.

Another first for the show will see Thomas talk directly to the audience to narrate it himself.

Ian McCue, senior producer at Thomas And Friends, said: ‘The show has undergone an evolution to remain relevant for the next generation of parents and children by opening up the world of Thomas And Friends so children can discover the world around them while being entertained.

The changes and new additions of characters and geographies will make the show more entertaining, inclusive and global – whilst ensuring all the favourite characters and storylines that fans around the world love remain at the heart of the action.’

Thomas the Tank Engine was created more than 70 years ago by Reverend Wilbert Awdry as part of his Railway Series of books, which have become a global brand including TV programmes, films, toys and live attractions.

Awdry’s granddaughter, Claire Chambers, welcomed the changes to the franchise, saying she thinks he would be ‘very happy’ with them. ‘If the gender-balanced Steam Team encourages more girls to maintain an interest then that can only be a good thing,’ she said.

The programme’s redevelopment included a collaboration with the UN Department of Public Information’s Creative Community Outreach Initiative to develop content inspired by the Sustainable Development Goals appropriate for a pre-school audience while in keeping with the Thomas And Friends brand.

Thomas And Friends will air daily from September 3 at 7am on Channel 5’s Milkshake.

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Feminism promotes obesity: Extremely overweight actress Chrissy Metz is "inspiring"

chrissy metz

This is “inspiring”

Chrissy Metz is an actress who is 5’4” and weighs 400 pounds according to bodymeasurement.org. The CDC has a body mass index (BMI) calculator that measures Chrissy’s BMI as 30.0 and above – she is obese. Her normal weight range should be 108 to 145 pounds.
People who are overweight or obese are at higher risk for chronic conditions such as high blood pressure, diabetes, and high cholesterol. According to Stanford Health Care, because of Chrissy’s obesity she is also subject to bone and joint disease, heart disease, sleep apnea, cancer, and metabolic syndrome (a clustering of medical conditions).
Yet in today’s society, “body shaming” is taboo. Thanks to feminism, we are told to be inclusive, body accepting, body positive, loving, and blah, blah, blah.
The “fat acceptance movement” and “fat feminism” do nothing to promote healthy women. To accept an obese body is to imply that one has no control over their behaviors. Our bodies are changeable and an obese person should be able to accept that truth. By resigning themselves to the impression that their bodies can’t be changed, they just perpetuate victimhood.
How about telling the truth for once? Chrissy is obese and there is nothing inspiring or empowering about that.
From Yahoo: The fashion industry is becoming more inclusive — at a snail’s pace, perhaps, but with palpable momentum behind the march of progress. It’s largely thanks not to the industry itself but to everyday people, whose beauty and bodies have long been overlooked and who have now stepped forward, demanding to be seen.
Chastity Garner and CeCe Olisa are two of those people, and they’ve stepped into view first as plus-size lifestyle influencers and bloggers and presently as founders of the popular annual event known as theCURVYcon. Now in its third year, the body-positive, curve-embracing event will take place in New York City on Sept. 8 and 9, bringing designers, fitness experiences, influencers, and speakers to town — including none other than Chrissy Metz, who stars on This Is Us, to deliver the keynote address (you heard it hear first, folks). Another first? TheCURVYcon will be live-streamed on Yahoo Style, bringing insightful conversation to millions of people who can’t make the IRL event.
Olisa and Garner are dedicated to promoting visibility of different body types within the plus-size world. That, in addition to Metz’s Emmy nomination, made the beloved actress the ideal woman to represent theCURVYcon this year. “A lot of times, in our space, the women who are celebrated are hourglass women — they’re a size 10 to 14, like the perfect version of a ‘plus-size’ woman,” Garner tells Yahoo Style. “I feel like [for] having size diversity and getting out of that hourglass shape, Chrissy Metz is a great representative for that. We love Ashley Graham, but she’s definitely the poster child of what a plus-size model ‘should’ look like. Someone like Chrissy Metz, her body type is a little bit different — we’re so happy to celebrate that.”
Olisa adds: “Representation is so important, and just seeing people who look like you anywhere is great. So when the hottest show on television has a very visibly plus-size girl who is cute, and falling in love, and doing her thing on the show, it’s inspiring.
While current conversations might make it easy to believe that such a space for plus-size women has always existed in the fashion community (during New York Fashion Week, no less), the reality is that it’s a recent phenomenon, spurred on by Garner and Olisa’s insistence that the industry make room.
“If inclusion isn’t happening by invitation, then we’re just going to move in ourselves,” Olisa tells Yahoo Style.
Read the rest of the story here.
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