Tag Archives: homeless

My homeless homie

The Council of Economic Advisers has reported that as of  September 2019 almost half (47 percent) of the nations total “unsheltered homeless people are found in the State of California, about four times as high as California’s share of the overall U.S. population. Rates of sheltered homelessness are highest in Boston, New York City, and Washington, D.C., with New York City alone containing over one fifth of all sheltered homeless people in the United States.”

They also report that out of the top five cities with the highest rates of unsheltered homeless, four are in California. The fifth is in Washington State.   From high to low it starts with “San Francisco has the highest rate of unsheltered homelessness at 60 per 10,000, 10 times as high as the U.S rate of 6 per 10,000.” Next is Los Angeles(19%), Santa Rosa, Seattle, and  the 5th is San Jose.

 

Although homelessness is a world wide problem, like many topics I write about, many times my main focus based in California.  I do this because it is where I live. It allow me to be more accurate about whatever it is I write about. I see things for myself, first hand. I have some first hand experiences with homeless people.  I spend a lot of time interacting  with homeless  people.  It’s not because I’m trying to be a “Joe charity” or a “Dudly do right” or for any other noble cause.  I do it because I have a difficult time turning my back on people that need help.   Financially I am in no position to be helping others and the whole experience has caused me a lot of grief in my life and . Just donating to some charity doesn’t work for me because I  think most charities are scams.  Not all, but most.  I work directly  with individuals because I see better results.  I see exactly where my time and money goes.  Some examples of how I help  could be anything from giving a person a job, a ride, in some cases a little cash.  I also spend some time helping people that  have a home but need assistance with their home or vehicle.  I’ve done various jobs such as laying new carpet, electrical work, roof repair, basic auto maintenance to auto theft recovery.  Each situation is different.  Today, my focus is on one individual homeless person that I have  encountered in my life.  For various reasons I’ll keep his identity private and call him JC.

When it comes to homeless people I see them as two types.  Ones that don’t want to be homeless and ones that want to be homeless. People with mental illness or people who end up homeless because of hardship usually fall under the ones that don’t want to be homeless.  People that have places where they can live, refuse to work or don’t do anything to change their living situation would fall under the ones that want to be homeless.  JC falls under the ones that want to be homeless.

I’ve known JC for around 3 years.  I once offered him a job. All he had to do was tie a ribbon around one piece of mistletoe. I needed a bunch of them.  He could work as many hours as he wanted.  No set number of the amount of them he had to tie.  Whatever he could produce was fine.  I was paying him $20 per hour.  He quit within 5 minutes.  He didn’t want to work.  I think the only time he worked was when he was fighting fires when he was in prison.  I remember there was a place where he had been living and the people that lived there had to move because the people that let JC stay there could not come up with all the rent.  JC said he would cover it when he moved in but he never came up with his share.  The people moved out and JC just decided he was going to stay.  The owners caught him there and they were kind enough to let his stay for awhile.  All he had to do was do some minor repairs.  Easy stuff like painting, cleaning and a little yard work.  He didn’t want to do any of that so he left and decided it was better to be homeless.

During this time he managed to find a girlfriend.  That didn’t improve things.  The last place they were staying at was at a friend of theirs.  She let them stay in her spare room for free.  They got mad at the lady that let them stay there because she was making too much noise raking up the leaves in her yard. They decided that they wanted to live in a tent in her yard. Then they decided being homeless was better.

None of this behavior makes sense to me.  In a first encounter with JC a person would think he was a normal person.  He would talk to himself sometimes and had some obvious insecurities.  He doesn’t come off as a person with a criminal history.  Isn’t the violent type. Not knowing what I  have mentioned he seems normal.  So I thought until he showed up at my place one day with a suitcase.  I work at home so It’s not unusual for someone to show up at my place.  This was different this time.  He didn’t call me so I didn’t expect him.  It’s late at night. He’s got a suitcase with him,  He was nonstop mumbling nonsense.  Obviously on some sort of drug or drugs.  I couldn’t understand  anything that he said.  Needless to say I told him to leave and to never show up at my place like that again, call first,etc.

I didn’t hear from him from him for about a year or so.  Then one night he shows up at my place.  Wearing the same clothes, with a different suitcase and looks like he hadn’t showered for a week or two.  Again he was wasted and nonstop mumbling nonsense but some of it I could understand.  He said that the last he left here he was stopped by the police about a block and a half away.  They ended up tasering him and taking him to jail.  That’s where he has been this whole time.  Again he was annoying me and had me pissed off so i told him to leave and gave him the same lecture as I did before.  A couple of days later i see him on my security monitor.  I can see anyone coming from any direction.  He has the same clothes on carrying the same suitcase and still looks like he hadn’t bathed in a week.  Right before he knocks I ask him if he called me. He says “no”.  I then asked “then why are you here” with a “go away”.  He said “sorry” and walked away.  He went to the same place that he got arrested at before, about a block and a half away.  That’s where he was found dead.   I’m told that his head looked like someone had beat him several times with a baseball bat. His location was in a place to make it looked like he jumped and killed himself.  You wont find this information anywhere.  I got the info from one of the people that discovered his body.  There’s no police log, no police investigation, no story in the newspaper, nothing.  Just an obituary that says he died on that day.  No names of relatives, which he has several family members that are local.  No funeral service.  It’s as if he never existed.

Living and dying is a part of life.  I’m no stranger to people dying.  I see it often.  More than I care.   I once had a friend that went to spend his day with his family.  I had talked to him in the morning.  That afternoon his father shot him and his whole family.  Then killed himself.  I knew another guy that got shot in the back while playing dice.  They torched him and the house trying to hide the crime.  Before that we were both hanging out at his uncles house.  It happen a couple of hours after he left.  Then a  couple of months  later I watched his father stumble out of his home.  He was sick and in bad shape. I  tried to get him to see a doctor.  He just drank more vodka and died that week.  I could go on and on talking about people that died shortly after talking to them.  My girlfriends uncle called and after talking to him, he died right after hanging up the phone.  Another uncle of hers died as he was calling us.  Another uncle died in our spare room.  I could go on but I’ll stop there.  It creeps me out and I’m starting to feel like the angel of death, or something.  With the exception of my girlfriend’s 3 uncles, which died of heart failure,   I often wonder if there was something I could have done that would have kept them alive.  More so when I think about JC.  The last thing I said to him was “go away.”  It’s a pretty selfish thought considering he’s the one that’s dead.  The best thing I can do, the only thing I can do is get in touch with his family, find out the truth behind his death and somehow find justice.  Like everyone, he wasn’t perfect, but he didn’t deserve to die..

JC’s death is a lot like the crime committed in New York by 24 year old suspect, Randy Rodriguez Santos,  He was arrested holding a metal bar that is believe to be the murder weapon used in the bludgeoning of 4 sleeping homeless men.  Like most murders, I have a difficult time trying to understand why it happens. More than 1,000 homeless people died in Los Angeles county in 2018. That I also have a difficult time trying to understand why it happens.  With all the technological advances, scientific breakthroughs, sending ships to Mars, everything combined that’s supposed to define us as an advanced civilization we still have petty killings.  We have people killing people over who they choose to warship..  Perhaps the most intellectually embarrassing are the people that kill other people because they cannot reach an agreement on what happens to you when you are dead. It shows that we really haven’t evolved as a species at all.

I’m not sure what my point is or why I felt to share my thoughts.  Maybe it’s because I’m tired of seeing people die for nothing.  I spend a lot of time trying to help people just make it though another day.  it bother me to see defenseless people killed.  I hope someone got  something out of this.  You’re all in my thoughts today.  Have a safe thanksgiving.

Respectfully Deplorable Patriot

RIP JC

 

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Acid attack comes to America: Homeless man hurls caustic chemical at UC Berkeley janitor

Acid and other corrosive chemical attacks are increasingly frequent in gun-control UK. See:

A victim of acid attack in Southampton, England, September 2015 (BBC photo)


Now acid attacks have come to America as well.
On April 3, 2018, at 1:35 a.m., a female janitor of the University of California, Berkeley, found a homeless man in a restroom in Wheeler Hall. She told the man he had to leave because the building was closed.
The man followed her out of the bathroom, then “threw a caustic chemical at her,” before fleeing the scene, according to a statement by UCPD (University of California Police Department).
The Berkeley Fire Department took the woman to a local emergency room for treatment of chemical burns.
Police searched the area for the suspect but could not locate him, said UCPD spokesman Sgt. Nicolas Hernandez. Hernandez declined to say whether UCPD has leads in the case or whether there might be surveillance video that could help detectives identify the assailant, also due to the ongoing investigation. Hernandez indicated that this type of assault is not a common occurrence on campus: “I’ve heard of it in my career before but I couldn’t tell you what the numbers are.”
According to recordings of police scanner activity that morning, paramedics said the bottle of fluid used in the assault was “essentially ammonia concentrate” and that the woman received burns on her torso.
The suspect is described as a white man in his 50s, 5′ 6″ to 5′ 7″ tall, with a white “scruffy” beard and white hair. He appeared to be homeless.
Anyone who has information about the crime is asked to contact the University of California Police Department’s Criminal Investigation Bureau at 510-642-0472.
Sources: Berkeleyside; CBS SF
See also:

Update (April 20, 2018):

The assailant is William Kearney, 62, a convicted pedophile. More here.
William Kearney
~Eowyn

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Berkeley homeless greet newly-elected pro-homeless mayor by smearing feces on City Hall

On November 8, the already far-left city of Berkeley, CA, tilted further to the left when residents voted in an even farther-left mayor and city council.

Jesse Arreguín (l) was endorsed by socialist Bernie Sanders (Photo courtesy of Arreguín; Source: Berkeleyside)

In an 8-candidate, ranked-choice voting, City Council member Jesse Arreguín was voted mayor with 15,912 votes.

A Democrat Party activist who, according to his biography, “has been passionately committed to social justice from an early age,” 32-year-old Arreguín has never held a regular private-sector job, and is pro-rent control and an advocate for the “homeless”.

On December 1, 2016, Arreguín was sworn in as mayor.
The next day, December 2, at around 5:15 a.m., about 20 police officers, accompanied by Berkeley’s code enforcement manager Greg Daniel and Assistant City Manager Jim Heyns, raided a homeless encampment just north of City Hall and a block from a high school.

As reported by Tracey Taylor for Berkeleyside, the raid was prompted by the discovery of feces spread “over a period of 24 hours, at various places on or near City Hall.” The city also reported problematic behavior from campers including public masturbation and offensive chalk messages on the sidewalks.

City Manager Dee Willams-Ridley described in a statement a number of “problematic behaviors” that had occurred during the 72 hours before the police raid:

November 30: In the morning, feces was discovered spread across the back walkway and back gate of City Hall. Staff immediately responded and cleaned it. That evening, staff exiting City Hall found the front door, door handle and door glass smeared with feces. We immediately responded and cleaned it.
December 1: The front door, door handle, and door glass were once again smeared with feces. Residents and visitors conducting business with the City, employees and guests coming for the Council swearing-in ceremony were told to enter through the back door. The first floor bathroom inside the Human Resources Department was also smeared with feces.

December 2: The north entrance door of Berkeley’s historic Old City Hall and the heating furnace at the Veterans Building were covered in excrement.

Civilian staff – who have acted with great dignity and professionalism in cleaning up feces – have reported that they have been treated in a hostile manner by members of the encampment for cleaning up the excrement. In addition, civilian staff have seen members of the camp masturbate and engage in sexual behavior at the site. City unions have also expressed concern about working conditions.

In addition to feces, the city’s civilian staff also found paint and chalk swastikas and messages on the sidewalk advocating suicide and “Fuck the Police”. Altogether, the staff removed 12 cubic yards of garbage, food, end caps of needles, mildewed or soiled fabric, broken chairs, and other debris. There were no arrests and no citations.

Willams-Ridley said that prior to the raid, city staff and a city homeless outreach worker from the Mental Health Division had been visiting the camp for several weeks to offer resources.

This is not the first time the largely same group of homeless people has been asked to leave a camp on public property. There have been several similar raids over the past two months.

By lunchtime on Dec. 2 after the police raid, some of the campers had already set up on the sidewalk across from the former camp, on the corner of Center and Milvia streets.

Mike Lee, of the homeless advocacy group First They Came for the Homeless and former candidate for Berkeley mayor, said he was furious because newly elected mayor Jesse Arreguín had assured homeless leaders that he would stop such raids from happening and would be an advocate for the homeless.

Today, mayor Arreguín is bringing a number of proposals to the City Council which will include a recommendation to allow homeless camping in designated areas, the locations of which  have yet to be determined.

~Eowyn

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Seattle Mayor: We need more tent cities

Progressive Seattle Mayor Ed Murray

 

KOMO: Mayor Ed Murray says there’s been a recent spike in the number of illegal homeless encampments in Seattle, and he wants additional “tent cities” approved to help address the issue.

A press release from the Mayor’s office states that the mayor will send proposed legislation to the City Council next month “to make a limited number of unused, vacant lots on private and public land” available for encampments. The areas included are not in residential neighborhoods or parks.

A task force Murray convened in October recommended that Seattle make it easier for tent cities to operate with oversight and legal services. “In recent months, more illegal encampments have popped up on our streets and sidewalks than ever before and the need for alternative spaces has grown immensely,” the mayor wrote in a letter to the task force last week.

Encampments have stirred controversy around Seattle, with politicians and advocates disagreeing about whether they save people from the streets or siphon resources away from safer, cleaner, more permanent options.

A handful of authorized encampments and many more unauthorized ones already exist in Seattle. Religious institutions are allowed to host tent cities with few restrictions, but encampments are allowed elsewhere only under temporary-use permits. The city funds 1,724 shelter beds in Seattle. An annual count of homeless residents in January found 3,123 people living on the streets of the city and King County.

Murray did not say how many lots should be opened, and his press secretary, Jason Kelly, declined to give a number. The task force called for seven.

Last year, a bill sponsored by Councilman Nick Licata would have allowed tent cities for up to a year on nonreligious properties in industrial and commercial zones. The council voted against it.

Murray said his proposed legislation will build off Licata’s. It calls for organizations operating the encampments to collect data about their clients; city money should only go to organizations that comply, he said. The mayor also said he would push for 150 additional shelter beds by early 2015, including at least 15 reserved for youth.

Murray balked at the task force’s proposal that some community centers be used to provide shelter, saying the centers must continue to focus on services for seniors and children, such as the city’s new preschool program.

The council last month set aside $200,000 in the city’s 2015 budget to help carry out the task force’s recommendations and $100,000 to support encampments.

Murray wrote that he has a separate advisory group working on long-term solutions to the city’s affordable-housing crisis.

Maybe Murray should set up a separate advisory group and task force to evaluate policies that lead to homelessness? He just might find a common thread.

DCG

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