Tag Archives: home ownership

Seattle transit agency dropping term “red line” because of racist implications

If you are a woke progressive, you can find racism in everything.

Take for example in Seattle: The local transit agency, Sound Transit, has decided to drop the term “red line” for a north-south route. This is because of an association with the racist term “redlining.”

According to Wikipedia, redlining refers to “the systematic denial of various services to residents of specific, often racially associated, neighborhoods or communities, either directly or through the selective raising of prices. While the best known examples of redlining have involved denial of financial services such as banking or insurance, other services such as health care (see also Race and health) or even supermarkets have been denied to residents.”

Apparently Sound Transit heard from a lot of community members who are very upset with the term red line. From their press release:

“As the term Red Line became more visible we heard concerns from members of our community, that this term carries unfortunate associations with the punitive practice by lenders of “redlining.”

Redlining describes the historical practice engaged in by banks to withhold home-loan funds or insurance from neighborhoods deemed to be poor economic risks. These neighborhoods were primarily comprised of racial and ethnic minorities, who were denied the opportunity to build generational wealth through home ownership.

These discriminatory practices caused widespread damage and inequities that have had a lingering impact to this day. In response, we are going to identify a new system for identifying our routes. It’s the right thing to do, and we are grateful for the community members who encouraged us to take this action.

While numerous transit systems around our country have red lines based on the widespread practice of using primary colors to label transit services, at Sound Transit we want to build a system that welcomes everyone. The term Red Line clearly works against this goal.”

Read their whole press release here.

I’m curious as to what color they will name the new line. I’m assuming the following are out due to political correctness: White, yellow and brown (for obvious reasons), blue and grey (associated with depression), and orange (think #OrangeManBad).

No matter what color they end up with, I’m sure some woke progressive – somewhere, somehow – will find a reason to be offended.

DCG

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Guess what Obama thinks he did wrong

This is Obama’s record as POTUS:


This is what the POS thinks he did wrong:

“I didn’t tell a good enough story”

Asked by CBS’ news anchor Charlie Rose to reflect on the past 3½ years as POTUS, this is what the POS said:
“When I think about what we’ve done well and what we haven’t done well, the mistake of my first term – couple of years – was thinking that this job was just about getting the policy right. And that’s important. But the nature of this office is also to tell a story to the American people that gives them a sense of unity and purpose and optimism, especially during tough times.”

That’s how clueless the POS is.

H/t Patriot Action Network
~Eowyn

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11% of U.S. Houses Sit Empty

Sure doesn’t look at an economic recovery to me!
But then I don’t work for the Fraud’s administration.  😉
~Eowyn

Nearly 11 Percent of US Houses Empty
By Diana Olick – CNBC – Jan 31, 2011

America’s home ownership rate, after holding steady for a while, took a pretty big plunge in Q4, from 66.9 percent to 66.5 percent. That’s down from the 2004 peak of 69.2 percent and the lowest level since 1998.
Homeownership is falling at an alarming pace, despite the fact that home prices have fallen, affordability is much improved and inventories of new and existing homes are still running quite high.
Bargains abound, but few are interested or eligible to take advantage.
More concerning than the home ownership rate is the vacancy rate. The Census tables don’t tell the entire story, but they tell a lot of it. Of the nearly 131 million housing units in this country, 112.5 million are occupied. 74.8 million are owned, and that’s only dropped by about 30 thousand in the past year. 38 million are rented, but that’s up by over a million year over year. That means more new households are choosing to rent.
Now to vacancies. There were 18.4 million vacant homes in the U.S. in Q4 ’10 (11 percent of all housing units vacant all year round), which is actually an improvement of 427,000 from a year ago, but not for the reasons you’d think.
The number of vacant homes for rent fell by 493 thousand, as rental demand rose. 471,000 homes are listed as “Held off Market” about half for temporary use, but the other half are likely foreclosures. And no, the shadow inventory isn’t just 200,000, it’s far higher than that.
So think about it. Eleven percent of the houses in America are empty. This as builders start to get more bullish, and renting apartments becomes ever more popular. Vacancies in the apartment sector have been falling steadily and dramatically, why? Because we’re still recovering emotionally from the toll of the housing crash.
Younger Americans have seen what home ownership has done to their friends and families, and many want no part of it. Credit has become very nearly elitist. Home prices, whatever your particular data provider preference might be, are still falling.

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