Tag Archives: gender fluidity

New York Times promoting sexualization of young boys

young boy wearing makeup

The new beauty “norm”

On Saturday, writer Bee Shapiro published an article in The New York Times entitled, “His Eye Makeup is Way Better Than Yours.

The Timestweeted it as such: “How teenage boys (and younger) wearing makeup are affecting beauty norms.”

The article shows many pictures of young boys making themselves pretty with makeup. Imagine the outcry if they had done this with young girls, trying to make them look “pretty.”

I don’t care how this author and The New York Times wants to spin this gender bender baloney. The fact that they found some young boys who desire to wear makeup does NOT make it the “norm.”

Excerpts from Bee’s article:

Would you be inclined to buy makeup because a 10-year-old boy is showing you how to create a look on Instagram? If we’re talking about Jack Bennett of @makeuupbyjack, then the answer could well be a resounding yes.

Since convincing his mother to start his account in May, young Mr. Bennett, who lives in Berkshire, England, has amassed 331,000 followers and attracted the attention of brands like MAC and NYX, which have offered products to create looks. Refinery29 has celebrated him as the next big thing in makeup.

He is the latest evidence of a seismic power shift in the beauty industry, which has thrust social media influencers to the top of the pecking order. Refreshingly, they come in all shapes, sizes, ages and, more recently, genders. Hailed by Marie Claire as the “beauty boys of Instagram,” the early male pioneers, like Patrick Simondac (@PatrickStarrr), Jeffree Star (@jeffreestar) and Manny Gutierrez, (@MannyMua733), have transcended niche to become juggernauts with millions of followers. And their aesthetic is decidedly new: neither old-school-rocker makeup nor drag queen.

“When you post an Instagram or YouTube video, it’s similar to ‘RuPaul’s Drag Race,’ where you can see the humanity of the contestants and see their struggles,” he said. “It helps show viewers that we’re just people.” He paused and giggled: “And it’s beauty, it’s just fun. Patrick is a walking rainbow.”

Men like Mr. Starrr have since influenced a new generation of young men who are wearing makeup and posting about it. According to the Instagram data team, there has been a 20 percent increase since the start of the year in mentions of “makeup” by male accounts on the platform.

In only a couple of years, these young men have gained sway in the industry. Cosmetics brands like Milk Makeup have built their offerings on genderless beauty; the skin-care company Glow Recipe hosts sold-out boy beauty mask classes; and in the fragrance aisle, unisex scent houses continue to grow.

“If you’re amazing at applying makeup, it doesn’t matter how old you are or what gender you identify with,” she said. “If you’re young, already embracing who you are and are insanely talented, those factors will make you stand out even more.”

Though the younger generation of influencers are of diverse molds, they are similar in that they take men wearing makeup as a given. “I didn’t think about gender identity, what you do with your life, things you associate yourself with,” Mr. Warden said, referring to the time he started his Instagram posts. “I think no matter what gender, you are free to do what you want.”

“What you have now are millennial moms who have grown up in an era where gender is more fluid,” Ms. Friedman said. “Millennials are very in tune with empowering their children.” For example, she sees a wide range of hair lengths on boys. “It’s not unusual for boys to sit in the chair, take out an iPhone and show a picture of what they want their hair to look like,” she said, adding that they start around age 6. “There are many role models for them to look to now.”

Read the whole article here.

h/t Twitchy

DCG

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Singer Sam Smith feels just as much a woman as he does a man

sam smith

From Yahoo: Sam Smith has opened up about his sexuality in a new interview, speaking frankly about gender and his identity.

Shortly after revealing that he came out as gay at the age of 10, Sam has confessed that he used to cross-dress as a teenager and feels “just as much a woman” as he does a man.

Speaking to Culture magazine, the 25-year-old singer admitted that he still has “loads of heels” at home, adding: “People don’t know this, but when I was 17, I remember becoming obsessed with Boy George and Marilyn, and all that.

“There was on moment in my life where I didn’t own a piece of male clothing, really. I would wear full make-up every day in school, eyelashes, leggings with Dr Martens and huge fur coats, for 2 1/2 years.”

When asked if he considers himself 100% male, Sam poignantly replied with: “I feel just as much woman as I am man.

“I got teased for it. But there were also people respecting me for walking around like that in my school.”

In an interview with iconic singer Sir Elton John, Sam praised his parents for being “incredibly supportive” when he came out as gay shortly after finishing primary school.

He said at the time: “I was very sure of, and in, myself. When I told my mum she said she always knew, she said she knew when I was three, and my dad just asked if I was absolutely sure. And I was sure, even at that age, but they were incredibly supportive.”

DCG

When SJWs bash their own: Vogue magazine apologizes for “gender-fluidity” cover story

vogue cover

Back in March, SJWs slammed Vogue for their lack of diversity on the cover that celebrated “the modern American woman” by featuring models of different ethnicities, skin tones and body types. Across social media, Vogue was criticized for staying inside the fashion industry’s narrow parameters (oh the horror!).

Now SJWs are upset that Vogue dare to tackle gender fluidity in the wrong manner. Heaven forbid a fashion magazine features models who talk about clothes swapping.

Seems likes SJWs are just as insufferable as feminists when you don’t follow their rules.

From Fox News: Vogue is sorry. The magazine released a statement on Friday apologizing for their recent cover story featuring Gigi Hadid and Zayn Malik.

In an interview with the publication, Hadid and Malik playfully talk about borrowing each other’s clothes, which led to the magazine titling their piece, “Gigi Hadid and Zayn Malik are part of a new generation embracing gender fluidity.”

“I shop in your closet all the time, don’t I?” Hadid says in the article. “Yeah, but same,” replies Malik. “What was that T-shirt I borrowed the other day?”

Vogue readers quickly took to social to voice their concerns over the piece, calling the magazine out for not featuring real people who identify as non-binary or gender-fluid. “Think Vogue is a bit confused on what gender fluidity is! Wearing your gf’s T-shirt does not make you gender fluid,” wrote one Twitter user.

“Is Vogue aware that there r actual, real life, gender fluid people out there,” another person wrote. “Vogue went from 100 to 0 real quick,” shared another reader.

Following backlash on social media, Vogue issued an apology.

“The story was intended to highlight the impact the gender-fluid, non-binary communities have had on fashion and culture,” read a statement by a Vogue spokeswoman. “We are very sorry the story did not correctly reflect that spirit we missed the mark.”

“We do look forward to continuing the conversation with greater sensitivity.”

DCG