Tag Archives: FunVax

15 years ago, Pentagon was told of viral vaccine that targets brains of religious ‘fundamentalists’

In his 2004 book, The God Gene: How Faith is Hardwired into our Genes, geneticist Dean Hamer proffered the hypothesis that a specific gene, vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2), predisposes humans towards religious, spiritual or mystic experiences.

Dean Hamer, who will be 69 on May 19, is a former independent researcher at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for 35 years, where he was the chief of Gene Structure and Regulation Section at the U.S. National Cancer Institute. He retired from the NIH in 2011.

There’s a video on YouTube that claims to have been taken at a presentation on April 13, 2005 before the Department of Defense (DOD) by a scientist who submitted a proposal to the DOD to develop a virus vaccine, dubbed FunVax, which could “cure” religious fundamentalists like Islamic extremists by inhibiting their VMAT2 God gene

Here’s the FunVax presentation:

Here is my transcript of what the DOD speaker said:

“On the left over here we have individuals who are religious fundamentalists, religious fanatics, and this is the expression of R2PCR (?), expression of the VMAT2 gene. Over here we have individuals who were not particularly fundamentalist, not particularly religious, and you can see there’s a much reduced expression of this particular gene, the VMAT2 gene.

Another evidence that supports our hypothesis for the development of this approach…. [At this point, the speaker is interrupted by a man in the audience who mumbles something about Islamic extremists bombing in the market place.] So our hypothesis is that these are fanatical people, that they have over-expression of the VMAT2 gene, and that by vaccinating them against this, we’ll eliminate this behavior.

So we have some very, very remarkable data in this next slide. Here we have two brain scans, their FMRIs [functional magnetic resonance imaging]. These are two different individuals with two difference expressions of VMAT2. On top is the individuals who’s a religious fanatic, an individual that…has high levels of VMAT2. Now, this individual down here who had low levels of the VMAT2 gene, this individual who self-describes as not particularly religious. In each case, these [two] individuals were read a religious text.

[Referring to the top brain scan of the religious fanatic.] This individual lit up, the right frontal gyrus as shown here, that’s the part of the brain that’s associated with theory of mind. It’s the part of the brain that has to do with intents, beliefs and desires. In marked contrast [referring to the bottom scan of the non-religious person], here’s the individual who’s not particularly self-described as religious, and when they’re read a religious text, what you see is that this part of the brain called the anterior cingular cortex lights up. It’s the part of the brain that’s associated with disgust or displeasure on hearing something.

[Inaudible question from the audience.]

So the data I’m presenting here supports the concept that we’re proposing, and I think that we would not propose to do CT scans or FMRIs on individuals out in the hinterlands of Afghanistan.

[Referring to the vaccine] The virus would immunize against the VMAT2 gene, and that would have the effect which you see here, which is essentially to turn a fanatic into a normal person, and we think that would have major effects in the Middle East.

[A man in the audience mumbles something about how this could be done.]

So the present plan and the test[s] we’ve done so far have used respiratory viruses, such as flu or rhino viruses, and we believe that’s the best way to get exposure of the largest part of the population. Most of us, of course, have been exposed to those two viruses, and we’re quite confident that this will be a very successful approach.

[Question from the audience: “What’s the name of this appraoch?”]

So the name of this project is FunVax, which is the vaccine for religious fundamentalists. The proposal has just been submitted, and I think that the data I have shown you today would support the development of this project, and we think this has great promise.

Note that the FunVax video bears two stamps on the upper right:

DOD ID: 159AZ2

Loc: Pent Rm BC232

According to the DOD’s “Navigating the Pentagon” webpage:

The Pentagon is a five-story building composed of five rings, A through E, built around a center courtyard….

Room numbers can be interpreted as follows:

  • The first number or letter indicates the floor on which the room is located (B = Basement, M = Mezzanine, 1-5 = floors).
  • The next letter is the ring on which the room is located. The main rings of the building are designated A,B,C,D, and E.
  • The next digit(s) indicate the corridor on which the room is located. Corridors are designated 1-10.
  • The last two digits indicate the specific bay or room number assigned to an office.

For example, Room BE834 means that the location is in the basement, on the E ring, near the eighth corridor, room 834.

Accordingly, the stamp on the DOD FunVax video, “Loc: Pent Rm BC232,” means Room 232 in the Basement of the Pentagon, on the C ring, near the second (2) corridor.

Unnervingly, the bespectacled FunVax speaker both resembles and sounds like Mr. Vaccine himself, Bill Gates. To compare their voices, here’s a video of Bill Gates speaking at a TED conference in 2014 about a coming pandemic.

This is what Dan Haber of the God gene said about the possibility of FunVax (0:42 mark]:

“So if indeed spirituality is a series of chemical reaction in the brain, and if it can be enhanced by certain types of drug, then naturally it follows that it can be inhibited as well because for every activator there must be an inhibitor. And so I can easily imagine that under the right circumstances, the right stimuli or the right drugs, and the right inhibitors might have some effect on a person’s spirituality at least in the short run. Whether or not that would have a long-term effect or people would undergo homeostatis and alter is an open question. We really don’t know the answer to that.”

Note that the other man in the above video is said to be scientist who gave the presentation before the DOD in 2005. If so, then the FunVax scientist is not Bill Gates.

The video below claims that FunVax was field-tested in Iraq in 2009 and subsequently released in Iran, which led to the Iranian people’s (unsuccessful) protests against the theocratic regime in Tehran, as well as the Arab Spring populist movement that swept across the Middle East in the early 2010s.

But according to Mick West of Metabunk.org, the DOD FunVax video is fake because:

  • There is no such room in the Pentago as BC232: “There isn’t enough space in that part of the Pentagon for 32 rooms… let alone a conference room. http://www.hqda.army.mil/aoguide/pentagon_map.htm” (Note from Eowyn: The URL doesn’t work. I got the message: “This site can’t be reached. www.hqda.army.mil’s server IP address could not be found.)
  • “The audio doesn’t match up and the brain scans are not of 2 different people. They are scans from a single 43 yr old meth addict” taken from a study on drug addiction in 2010: https://n.neurology.org/content/75/18_Supplement_1/S67. “Exact same brain scans as the second one in the study.”
  • “The projectors in video is most likely Epson PowerLite 6110i with wire cover on the back, this model was released in 2008, but video claims to be filmed in 2005.”
  • “Also at 3:01 you may see focus breathing, which suggests that it was a contrast detect autofocus camera, this kind of tech wasn’t available in 2005, you often may see this kind of focusing issues on late 2000s dslrs (most likely it was filmed on 5d mark ii or something similar)”

If the FunVax video is real and assuming that the Pentagon approved the project, although the vaccine originally was intended for Islamic religious fanatics (“fundamentalists”), we must ask these questions:

  1. Who decides what “religious fundamentalism” is and who “religious fundamentalists/fanatics” are?
  2. What’s to prevent the vaccine from being deployed against devout Christians?

See also:

~Eowyn

Drudge Report has gone to the dark side. Check out Whatfinger News, the Internet’s conservative frontpage founded by a military veteran!

Please follow and like us:

Share and Enjoy !

0Shares
0 0