Tag Archives: Foreign Policy

FBI's primary focus is no longer law enforcement

When we see the initials FBI, we automatically think of iconic crime-fighters like Eliot Ness and the old TV show with the actor Efrem Zimbalist, Jr.
Indeed, according to Wikipedia, “The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a governmental agency belonging to the United States Department of Justice that serves as both a federal criminal investigative body and an internal intelligence agency (counterintelligence). […] The FBI has investigative jurisdiction over violations of more than 200 categories of federal crime.”
Well, put those images of Ness and Zimbalist into mothball!
Quietly and unnoticed by all, except national security attorney Kel McClanahan, sometime ago the FBI abandoned law enforcement as its primary mission. Below are the “before” and “after” FBI Fact Sheets:
FBI
On the FBI’s “Quick Facts” page, its priorities are listed as follows, with counter-terrorism, not law enforcement, as the Number One priority :
1. Protect the United States from terrorist attack
2. Protect the United States against foreign intelligence operations and espionage
3. Protect the United States against cyber-based attacks and high-technology crimes
4. Combat public corruption at all levels
5. Protect civil rights
6. Combat transnational/national criminal organizations and enterprises
7. Combat major white-collar crime
8. Combat significant violent crime
9. Support federal, state, local and international partners
10. Upgrade technology to successfully perform the FBI’s mission
Hmm, don’t we have another federal agency, the Department of Homeland Security, which was created after 9/11 for the express purpose of counter-terrorism?
John Hudson writes for Foreign Policy:

Instead of declaring “law enforcement” as its “primary function,” as it has for years, the FBI fact sheet now lists “national security” as its chief mission. The changes largely reflect the FBI reforms put in place after September 11, 2001, which some have criticized for de-prioritizing law enforcement activities. Regardless, with the 9/11 attacks more than a decade in the past, the timing of the edits is baffling some FBI-watchers.

“What happened in the last year that changed?” asked Kel McClanahan, a Washington-based national security lawyer.

McClanahan noticed the change last month while reviewing a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request from the agency. The FBI fact sheet accompanies every FOIA response and highlights a variety of facts about the agency. After noticing the change, McClanahan reviewed his records and saw that the revised fact sheets began going out this summer. “I think they’re trying to rebrand,” he said. “So many good things happen to your agency when you tie it to national security.”

Although a spokesman with the agency declined to weigh in on the timing of the change, he said the agency is just keeping up with the times. “When our mission changed after 9/11, our fact sheet changed to reflect that,” FBI spokesman Paul Bresson told Foreign Policy. He noted that the FBI’s website has long-emphasized the agency’s national security focus. “We rank our top 10 priorities and CT [counterterrorism] is first, counterintel is second, cyber is third,” he said. “So it is certainly accurate to say our primary function is national security.” On numerous occasions, former FBI Director Robert Mueller also emphasized the FBI’s national security focus in speeches and statements. 

FBI historian and Marquette University professor Athan Theoharis agreed that the changes reflect what’s really happening at the agency, but said the timing isn’t clear. “I can’t explain why FBI officials decided to change the fact sheet… unless in the current political climate that change benefits the FBI politically and undercuts criticisms,” he said. He mentioned the negative attention surrounding the FBI’s failure in April to foil the bomb plot at the Boston Marathon by Dzhokhar and Tamerlan Tsarnaev.

Whatever the reason, the agency’s increased focus on national security over the last decade has not occurred without consequence. Between 2001 and 2009, the FBI doubled the amount of agents dedicated to counterterrorism, according to a 2010 Inspector’s General report. That period coincided with a steady decline in the overall number of criminal cases investigated nationally and a steep decline in the number of white-collar crime investigations.

“Violent crime, property crime and white-collar crime: All those things had reductions in the number of people available to investigate them,” former FBI agent Brad Garrett told Foreign Policy. “Are there cases they missed? Probably.”

Last month, Robert Holley, the special agent in charge in Chicago, said the agency’s focus on terrorism and other crimes continued to affect the level of resources available to combat the violent crime plaguing the city. “If I put more resources on violent crime, I’d have to take away from other things,” he told The Chicago Tribune.

According to a 2007 Seattle Post-Intelligencer investigation, the Justice Department did not replace 2,400 agents assigned to focus on counterterrorism in the years following 9/11. The reductions in white-collar crime investigations became obvious. Back in 2000, the FBI sent prosecutors 10,000 cases. That fell to a paltry 3,500 cases by 2005.  “Had the FBI continued investigating financial crimes at the same rate as it had before the terror attacks, about 2,000 more white-collar criminals would be behind bars,” the report concluded. As a result, the agency fielded criticism for failing to crack down on financial crimes ahead of the Great Recession and losing sight of real-estate fraud ahead of the 2008 subprime mortgage crisis.

In many ways, the agency had no choice but to de-emphasize white-collar crime. Following the 9/11 attacks, the FBI picked up scores of new responsibilities related to terrorism and counterintelligence while maintaining a finite amount of resources. What’s not in question is that government agencies tend to benefit in numerous ways when considered critical to national security as opposed to law enforcement. “If you tie yourself to national security, you get funding and you get exemptions on disclosure cases,” said McClanahan. “You get all the wonderful arguments about how if you don’t get your way, buildings will blow up and the country will be less safe.”

One can’t help but think:
Let’s say you’re a malicious power-mad elite who are bent on transforming the United States into a police state.
What better way to do that than to exaggerate or outright concoct a terrifying bogeyman — THE MUSLIM TERRORIST — a bogeyman so horrible that the American people will beg for protection and willingly surrender more and more of their constitution-guaranteed liberties for that protection?
Just a thought.
~Eowyn

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Obama Foreign Policy Urges Freeing Mega-Terrorist To Run for Office

Report: US Pushing Israel to Free Barghouti

The Obama administration wants Israel to release arch-terrorist Marwan Barghouti so he can run for election.
By Gavriel Queenann

First Publish: 12/29/2011, 5:20 PM

 

Marwan Barghouti

Marwan Barghouti
Arutz Sheva photo: Flash 90

The Obama administration is trying to convince Israel to release arch-terrorist and mass-murderer Marwan Barghouti.
According to the Hamas-aligned Al Quds daily, Washington views Barghouti as its preferred candidate for Fatah to field against Hamas in Palestinian Authority (PA) elections in May 2012.
“A high-profile US delegation has regularly discussed with officials in Tel Aviv the option to free Al Barghouti to lead Fatah against Hamas in the next elections,” the sources that the daily did not identify, said.
The Al-Quds report comes as Arab capitals are abuzz with the news that PA chairman Mahmoud Abbas will not seek re-election, leaving Washington concerned Fatah has no one to field against Hamas.
However, the release of Barghouti, who was sentenced to five life sentences for as many terror related murders in Israel, and who security services say is responsible for at least 21 other murders, is widely opposed in Israel.  Full Story
I strongly object to the Obama foreign policy that  tramples on the national sovereignty of Israel and the safety of her people.  I hope Netanyahu will tell the Obama Administration to stuff it where the sun don’t shine – as he did on his last visit to Washington D.C.  ~LTG

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