Tag Archives: Firearm Safety

Hypocrite: Pro-gun control singer Cardi B wields gun in her new video

Cardi B is a 26-year-old “singer” who I told you about back in March. She had confessed to drugging and robbing men because she had “limited options.”

After the Parkland shooting she stated: “…that the strict gun laws that govern the state of New York should be a staple nationwide.” She said she believes that mental evaluations for those wishing to purchase guns should be standard, and that the minimum age to own a gun should be higher than 21. Personally, she added, that she was a “dumbass” at that age.”

She also disapproved of President Trump’s stance in response that teachers should be armed. “When it came to the school shooting, that’s when I was like, ‘Okay, this nigga really think that everything is a joke,’” she said of Trump. “Have you ever shot a gun before? It’s very scary and loud. It’s traumatizing to shoot somebody,” she added.

In her new video she wields a gun while ignoring one basic rule of firearm safety (finger on the trigger).

I’m not going to post the video here as it includes nudity (it’s racy, raunchy and she uses foul language, including the N word). You can watch the video here.

If you are going to preach gun control, at least handle a firearm safely. What a HYPOCRITE.

DCG

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Ironic: Moms Demand gives presentation on gun safety, fails to model responsible behavior

Moms Demand modeling “responsible” behavior/ Lewiston Tribune photo

I love it when gun grabbers prove they know nothing about basic firearm safety and don’t practice what they preach. Granted, the gun this woman is holding in the picture is an air pellet gun yet she is contradicting the firearm safety rules listed directly behind her.

The Lewiston Tribune in Idaho reports that Bloomberg’s “Moms Demand” held a class to teach people about gun safety. From their report:

“A new group in the Lewiston-Clarkston Valley is taking a grassroots approach to preventing unintentional firearm deaths among children by educating parents and gun owners about responsible ways to store guns.

The Moms Demand Action group held its second information session Wednesday to present the organization’s BeSmart campaign message, which aims to make adults responsible for the safety of children while around guns.

According to numbers presented by the group, each year in the United States nearly 300 children younger than age 18 gain access to a firearm and unintentionally shoot themselves or someone else — often fatally. Another 500 children a year kill themselves with a gun.

“Deliberately, there is nothing in this program that says you shouldn’t have a gun*,” said Marcia Banta, a member of Moms Demand Action. “As a matter of fact, we are speaking much to people who do own guns. I am confident there is no one in this valley who sells guns that wants those guns to harm children.”

Banta, of Lewiston, has a concealed carry permit. She helped bring the program to the valley because she thinks it offers valuable tips.

As for Christie Fredericksen, also with Moms Demand Action, her family has been personally affected by gun violence. With the increased school shootings around the nation, she decided to join the organization. “It’s promoting common-sense solutions to decrease gun violence,” Fredericksen said.

The United States has the highest rate of unintentional shootings in the world, according to the presenters. Around 4.6 million children in America live in homes where guns are not safely locked up or are loaded when not in use.

“Gun violence has become all too common,” Fredericksen said. “If you haven’t been affected by it personally, you most likely know someone who has.”

The campaign’s message is simple. It encourages adults to take five steps to prevent child gun deaths and injuries. Those include securing guns in homes and vehicle by making sure they are unloaded and properly locked up; modeling responsible behavior around guns; asking about unsecured guns in other homes and vehicles kids plan to visit; recognizing the risks of teen suicide; and telling peers about the campaign.

The duo hopes to spur dialogue in the valley that will lead to fewer accidental shootings.”


*It’s ironic that the Moms Demand representative would make this statement considering their financier, gun-grabber Michael Bloomberg, is spending big bucks to eliminate your Second Amendment rights.

DCG

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Seattle-King County Public Health want doctors to be more inquisitive into patient firearm access/ownership

guns
On Tuesday, Seattle-King County Public Health published a statement with their intent to decrease gun violence. The blog was posted by Dr. Jeff Duchin, Health Officer for Public Health – Seattle & King County.
About Dr. Duchin: “Jeff served for over 15 years as Chief of the Public Health’s Communicable Disease Epidemiology & Immunization Section. Jeff trained as a Medical Epidemiologist in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) after which he completed the CDC’s Preventive Medicine Residency program.”
See his full bio here.
The doctor is on Twitter. Here’s a few of his tweets:

The blog post by Seattle-King County Public Health talks about suicide and firearm-related injuries including statistics, deaths  and costs to taxpayers. Read the full blog post here.
Here are excerpts from the agency’s new pledge:
“For that reason, Public Health is joining with leading medical professional associations to form a new collaboration with a renewed commitment to decrease firearm-related injury and deaths by working together and using a public health approach.
Prevention is the core of a public health approach, and firearm injuries and deaths can be prevented. We must address prevention of firearm-related injuries in the same way we do for other types of injuries, poisonings, and infectious and chronic diseases, using a public health approach that includes:

  • Screening to identify patients with risk factors for firearm-related injury
  • Educating patients and families about risk factors, firearm safety and injury prevention as we do for other diseases and causes of injury – gun owners and non-gun owners alike understand the importance of firearm safety
  • Gathering data and conducting research on risk and protective factors for firearm related injury and death in order to make evidence-based recommendations and strategies
  • Promoting the adoption of successful prevention strategies, including those addressing upstream drivers of violence, such as childhood abuse, neglect and trauma, poverty, substance use disorders, disrupted families and communities, and being a victim of violence
  • Fostering multidisciplinary and community collaborations with stakeholders interested in reducing firearm-related injury and death, including gun-owners

The medical community has an important role in this work.  You can read our joint statement, which includes a description of our approach and examples of actions healthcare providers can take to reduce firearm-related injury and death, at https://www.kingcounty.gov/firearm-injuries-ph. 
(WARNING: I tried clicking on the link to read the document and each time I did my computer froze. Not sure if it’s just my computer or the Public Health link.)
This collaboration among healthcare provider professional organizations is the first of many steps local and statewide medical professionals can take together to reduce firearm injury and death in our communities. We invite other healthcare professional organizations to join us by endorsing our statement and/or participating in our future work.”
MyNorthwest.com has some more details:
“Those efforts include joining with experts at Harborview Injury Prevention and Research Center, Washington State Medical Association, King County Medical Society, and other state and local medical groups to recommend more screening and education for patients of all ages, including everything from identifying risk factors to talking to them about the importance of safely storing guns.
It recommends medical professionals should also respect beliefs of lawful firearm owners in order to effectively communicate. Also, to use healthcare providers who are also gun owners to provide leadership and knowledge on the issue.


I wonder if any of the “data” gathered by doctors could be used in the future to determine if compliance is being achieved with Mayor Durkan’s proposed new gun legislation?
DCG

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Vogue magazine asks, "Should we still let children play with toy guns?"


It’s the “Classic Mother BB Gun Block.”
Pro-tip for the women cited in this article: We have THOUSANDS of strict gun laws already on the books. The problem is enforcement and those darn criminals who don’t obey them.
And if you’re interested in teaching your child about proper firearm safety instead of an irrational fear, there are LOTS of resources available. For example, see here, here, here, here, here and here.
From Yahoo (originally from Vogue): Over the weekend, on a party supplies run at Flying Tiger, the charming Danish discount store, my 4-year-old daughter’s eyes sparkled at the sight of a neon-color water gun. “Can I have that?” she asked—the same question she’d repeated at the sight of the modeling clay and princess crowns and silly straws.
I wavered for a beat. I’d come of age in the late ’80s and ’90s—the height of the backyard Super Soaker battle. And before that water gun became the hottest ticket at Toys “R” Us, my brother and I had wielded tiny green plastic water pistols filled and refilled with rudimentary plugs, sneakily shooting each other in the eyes. I remember all of this as pure, absurd fun.
“No,” I told my daughter, and briskly steered her on.
I offered no explanation in the moment—and I hadn’t really turned the question over in my head before—but my gut gave me my answer: that I didn’t want to introduce her to this or any other gun in a world that already seemed to be teeming with them in movies and video games, on TV and, most of all, on the news. Her fleeting interest in the toy gun was innocent, but, sadly, my view of it no longer was.
The water gun fights my brother and I used to have in the summer were from another era, maybe even another world—before Columbine and Parkland; Orlando and Sutherland Springs; and before these much-covered mass shootings rightfully reminded the public of the regularly occurring violence in lower socioeconomic and minority communities.
Back then, guns might have been just toys; now, it’s impossible for me not to see them as charged with the trauma of recent events.
I considered that same question again today—should we let our children play with toy guns at a time when the U.S. is grappling with the impact of gun violence?—when I saw the pictures of Prince George holding a rather realistic-looking black toy gun at an English polo match over the weekend. Part of the debate over toy guns has hinged on distinguishing them, clearly, as toys—so as never to be mistaken for the real thing. There are state laws, including one in New York, requiring toy guns be brightly colored, as opposed to black, aluminum, or silver. Perhaps for this reason, the photos stood out: to some eyes, the prince’s looked eerily like a real pistol.
“I gasped when I saw the photos,” an American friend said on Facebook.
And she has a reason to: America has a gun violence homicide rate that is 25 times higher than that of other developed countries, according to Everytown for Gun Safety; we outrank all other countries in the number of mass shootings that occur here; we own an estimated half of all civilian guns worldwide. A child wielding a toy gun in the U.K., where firearms are much harder to obtain, arouses a different sense of shock or unease than they might in America, though no less alarming—remember the brouhaha when Pippa Middleton’s friend pointed a firearm out of their convertible at a paparazzi?
There’s also the matter of who’s holding the toy gun. “The photo of Prince George juxtaposed with the story of Tamir Rice, a young black boy killed by police in Ohio because he had a toy gun in hand is an important part of the racial and white supremacy dynamics at play here,” Erika Soto Lamb, the founding and former head of communications for Everytown and Moms Demand Action for Gun Safety and a mother of two sons, ages 5 and 7, told Vogue. “It’s not safe for a black child in America to play with toy guns.”
Soto Lamb is a Texas native who was raised around real guns; she grew up playing cops and robbers and revering A Christmas Story—the irreverent classic in which mischievous young Ralphie Parker dreams of his very own BB gun. But she does not allow her two sons to play with toy guns of any kind. While at Everytown and Moms Demand Action, “when my life was a daily deluge of news stories about gun violence in America, and working with mothers whose children had been killed, it was simply untenable to come home and hand my children guns to play with,” Soto Lamb said.
When I began asking other parents today about kids and toy guns, many echoed her uneasiness. “My daughter is just 3, but I don’t think a gun can be an innocent toy in this day and age,” Anna Davies, a fellow writer in Jersey City, New Jersey, told me. “It’s much easier to just not have them in our lives.”
Another friend said she was “uncomfortable” when her 5-year-old daughter recently received a toy water gun in a birthday party goodie bag. One mother stealthily returned a “machine-gun” toy loaded with foam pellets that her son received at his own birthday party. “It was designed to look like the real deal,” she said. “I was so horrified, I immediately stashed it away while he was busy tearing into his other gifts.”
I can hear the other side now: that parents denying their kids toy guns are overthinking this. That a toy is still just a toy. But if Barbies arguably possess the power to body shame little girls, and princesses can mess with their sense of independence, then can’t guns, even if just subliminally, sanction violence? “I believe we have a cultural problem with guns in this country, and I don’t want to normalize the use of them,” Kathy Healy Champion, a mother of three in Connecticut, said. She doesn’t allow her children to play with toy guns. “I see it as a step in the right direction.”
After Sandy Hook, Soto Lamb says she began to view A Christmas Story through a different lens: “I realized that America’s problem with gun violence goes deeper than any laws, there is a cultural shift that needs to happen,” she said. “We give them blocks to inspire them to be builders, we give them paint to inspire artistic expression . . . what are we feeding our children, in the metaphorical sense, when we hand them toy guys to play with?
It doesn’t have to be a real gun to spark debate: According to Apple, Google, Facebook, Microsoft, and Twitter, even emoji guns carry a certain charge that doesn’t necessarily belong in our texts or tweets: all of those companies scrapped their original gun emojis in favor of “water guns.” The TSA—Transportation Security Administration—recommends toy guns be packed with checked baggage; it bans “squirt guns, Nerf guns, toy swords, or other items that resemble realistic firearms or weapons.”
For some parents, the question of how to handle toy guns is ongoing—some allow just water guns and only of the bright-colored variety. Others have nuanced rules—that toy guns should never be pointed at people or used to pretend-kill someone. (But, then again, that’s usually the point of a gun, whether real or fake.) Some parents say the decision isn’t easy—one mother reluctantly allows her sons to partake in paintball gunning, so as not to make them feel left out among friends. The hardest part for Soto Lamb is banning water guns. “Water guns are really so fun, but let’s be honest, Super Soakers are basically assault weapon–style water guns,” she said. “We make do with water blasters”—long tubes with no trigger—“and water balloons.”
Several parents told me their concerns about toy guns tend to get dwarfed by their worry over real gun violence. Responding to some online backlash about Prince George’s toy gun, Davies said, “I wish the outrage would continue to be directed at the NRA, not Prince George and the royal family. Maybe if we lived in a society that had strict gun laws, our toddlers could also play with pretend guns. I think it’s actually something to aspire to—let’s become a society where guns are just as fantastical as lightsabers.”
DCG

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A lesson in gun safety…and parenting

Bad parents....

Girl’s gun goes off in Starbucks

Wyoming News:   A 17-year-old Cheyenne teen was cited Monday after she dropped her purse, causing the gun she was carrying in it to go off in a local coffee shop.  After the round fired, the girl said, “I think my purse went off!”
According to the Cheyenne Police report about the incident, the girl, whose name is being withheld because she is a juvenile, dropped her purse around 6:45 a.m. Monday while she was at the cash register at Starbucks, 1112 Central Ave.  Two Cheyenne Police officers were in the coffee shop at the time. Once they heard the gunshot, they drew their pistols and scanned the shop.
The officers approached the teen and searched her purse, which had a large hole in it.  They found a double-barrel .38 special Derringer pistol in the girl’s purse. The top barrel had been fired.  According to the report, the bullet missed John Basile, 43, by about 12 inches. After nearly missing Basile’s head, the bullet hit the west wall of the store, bounced back to the east and rolled under the coffee counter.
The officers had the teen call her parents, who responded to Starbucks shortly after the incident.  The girl’s father said he had given the teen the pistol and encouraged her to carry it while traveling for her protection.  The girl said she keeps the gun in her room and had it with her because she was going to visit friends in Laramie.
She said she has never taken a hunter safety class or any kind of formal firearms training.  The teen’s mother told police that she doesn’t particularly like firearms because they “may just go off.” She said she knew her daughter had a pistol and encouraged her to point it at a “bad person” if she was ever in trouble.  The gun was returned to the teen’s parents.
The girl was issued a city summons for possession of a firearm by a juvenile, which carries a $750 bond and a “must appear in court” stipulation.  City ordinance stipulates that individuals must be 18 years old to carry any type of firearm within city limits.  Wyoming state statutes state that a person must be 21 years old to carry a concealed weapon.  According to federal law, individuals must be 21 years old to buy a pistol and 18 to buy a rifle or shotgun.
Several things oh so wrong with this:

  1. What kind of parent lets their teenager carry a gun without proper firearm training?  Are they out of their minds?
  2. She isn’t 18 so obviously didn’t have a concealed weapons permit, not cool.
  3. Why wasn’t she carrying this gun in a holster?  I know some women do carry in their purse yet a holster is much safer for preventing an accidental discharge.

In this case, I think the parents should be fined as well, at least for being major idiots (I know, that doesn’t exist).  Do they realize how lucky they are that the gun didn’t fire back up in their daughter’s face?  Or kill someone else?  Or kill one of those police officers?  It’s idiots like this that give responsible gun owners a bad name, and gives those proggies against the Second Amendment more “ammunition”.
DCG

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